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Hunting season

Maister

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#1
Deer season is wrapping up this week. The piles of sugar beets at the gas stations have gone away and next week all the local bars will take down their "welcome hunters" banners (for which no sign permits were obtained in the first place). You can still blast red squirrels, possums, feral pigeons, and skunks all year long but deer season wraps up the day after tomorrow. http://www.huntingseasonhq.com/michigan-hunting-seasons/

There's a different vibe to the community during deer season. My father used to work at a Buick plant and said during November that a handful of guys on the line would clean up with all the double and triple overtime they could get covering for folks out deer hunting. Even now industrial parking lots look a bit sparse.

Do you notice a change in atmosphere during deer season in your neck of the woods?
 

mendelman

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#2
[video=youtube;9-k5J4RxQdE]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9-k5J4RxQdE[/video]
 

kms

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#3
Deer season is wrapping up this week. The piles of sugar beets at the gas stations have gone away and next week all the local bars will take down their "welcome hunters" banners (for which no sign permits were obtained in the first place). You can still blast red squirrels, possums, feral pigeons, and skunks all year long but deer season wraps up the day after tomorrow. http://www.huntingseasonhq.com/michigan-hunting-seasons/

There's a different vibe to the community during deer season. My father used to work at a Buick plant and said during November that a handful of guys on the line would clean up with all the double and triple overtime they could get covering for folks out deer hunting. Even now industrial parking lots look a bit sparse.

Do you notice a change in atmosphere during deer season in your neck of the woods?
Absolutely. Traffic was lighter for my morning and afternoon commute yesterday, and a little lighter this morning. The phones aren't ringing. It's really kind of peaceful, unless you're a deer.
 

dvdneal

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#4
Not so much here, but in other counties it gets noticed. Welcome hunter breakfast specials. Making appointments with people get more difficult because they're out hunting pheasant.
 

JNA

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#5
It just seems with deer hunting season two particular news stories always appear -

1 - accidental shootings

2 - serious injuries & deaths resulting from falls from tree stands
 
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#6
In our office there are only a couple of folks who always take time off to go hunting and unless the first day of the season is a weekday like it was this year, I never really notice a difference in traffic. It does seem slightly lighter in the morning of the first day if it's a weekday but after that it seems like it's back to normal. However, I know that the few days before opening day, the traffic on the main freeway out of Detroit heading Up North can get really heavy rivaling what it's like on the road headed Up North at the start of a long holiday weekend in the summer.

The Detroit newspapers always do a couple of stories each year about how life changes in some of the many small towns Up North when the population suddenly swells during hunting season each fall. One of the stories that really stuck out from the paper last year was how there are a few small towns with tiny bars that during hunting season suddenly become strip clubs and girls come from places like Las Vegas or Atlanta or Dallas to come work at a bar in some podunk backwoods hunt camp town for a few days.
 

Maister

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#7
The Detroit newspapers always do a couple of stories each year about how life changes in some of the many small towns Up North when the population suddenly swells during hunting season each fall. One of the stories that really stuck out from the paper last year was how there are a few small towns with tiny bars that during hunting season suddenly become strip clubs and girls come from places like Las Vegas or Atlanta or Dallas to come work at a bar in some podunk backwoods hunt camp town for a few days.
detroitplanner and I used to (coincidently) frequent the same tiny burg Up North, Luzerne, MI. There's a well-known bar up there called Ma Deeters that was a regular watering hole for the hunting crowd. Rumor has it in years past the rooms in back could be rented out....by the hour.
 

Big Owl

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#8
Deer season in NC runs from the second week in September to January 1st. My area is not a sought out location for deer hunting, so it's locals mainly. A lot of hunters from this area head down to the eastern part of the state where the deer are more plentiful and the limits are less restrictive. Down east you see the signs welcoming hunters but up here you don't.

It's interesting because some years ago NC started to allow hunters to bait areas with non-process foods, which is mainly corn, acorns, and apples around here. I know guys that start putting out corn or apples in the summer in preparation for deer season in the fall then they brag about having free meat in the freezer. I just wonder what the real price of that "free" meat when you factor in the cost of a license, equipment & supplies, and other cost. Personally, I wish my municipality would allow urban archery season just because our city is a defacto game preserve and as result we have a high number of deer being hit by vehicles.
 

mendelman

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#9
Personally, I wish my municipality would allow urban archery season just because our city is a defacto game preserve and as result we have a high number of deer being hit by vehicles.
Dittos here in NE OH. We are having a major problem with this. My actual neighborhood/street is one of the deer circulation paths in my City. I regularly see 2-4 deer strolling through my yard almost everyday. I've even had a big 6 point buck stroll through one Saturday morning.

If I could hunt in the City, I wouldn't even have to leave my back deck.
 
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Gedunker

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#11
A friend's father in northeast Pennsylvania had to paint "COW" in flourescent orange paint on his cattle to keep hunters from mistaking them for deer. He had had several shot and killed in previous years. Needless to say, he didn't think very highly of deer hunters.

When I lived in the Poconos, the first day of Deer Season was like a state holiday. There would be tons of trucks parked along the side of wooded roads and you would often hear the report of rifles off in the distance somewhere. It was a good day to stay off the Appalachian Trail, for sure.

I know some pretty serious hunters here in the Hoosier state, but it just doesn't have the same feel as the Poconos. Then there is the law that accidently forbade rifle hunting on state property. But, heck, you can "hunt" fenced deer all you like here, so ....
 
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#12
A friend's father in northeast Pennsylvania had to paint "COW" in flourescent orange paint on his cattle to keep hunters from mistaking them for deer. He had had several shot and killed in previous years. Needless to say, he didn't think very highly of deer hunters.

When I lived in the Poconos, the first day of Deer Season was like a state holiday. There would be tons of trucks parked along the side of wooded roads and you would often hear the report of rifles off in the distance somewhere. It was a good day to stay off the Appalachian Trail, for sure.

I know some pretty serious hunters here in the Hoosier state, but it just doesn't have the same feel as the Poconos. Then there is the law that accidently forbade rifle hunting on state property. But, heck, you can "hunt" fenced deer all you like here, so ....
I grew up on a dairy farm and we had a few hundred acres and people always asked my dad if they could hunt on our property and he never allowed it because he didn't want a cow getting shot by mistake. Thankfully, all of our cows were Holsteins though so it's a little harder to mistake them for a deer so none ever got shot by people hunting on neighboring land.

There are a couple state parks/recreation areas near my office that I like to run at occasionally early in the morning before work. I never go this time of year just because I am afraid of getting shot at.
 

Planit

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#13
When something moves, you shoot...right?

We've have deer in the park next to our house. There's a LED streetlight in front of the park that is bright but they don't seem to mind in the middle of the night when they come to eat the troves of acorns on the ground. I've seen as many as 6 at one time.
 
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#14
I grew up on a dairy farm and we had a few hundred acres and people always asked my dad if they could hunt on our property and he never allowed it because he didn't want a cow getting shot by mistake. Thankfully, all of our cows were Holsteins though so it's a little harder to mistake them for a deer so none ever got shot by people hunting on neighboring land.

There are a couple state parks/recreation areas near my office that I like to run at occasionally early in the morning before work. I never go this time of year just because I am afraid of getting shot at.
I had a friend whose family had a small herd of cows. They had a big range that included pasture and some wooded areas. Every year before deer season his dad took bright orange spray paint and wrote "COW" on each side of each animal.

We also had some jackass here over the weekend who shot a 400+ pound black bear in my city's watershed area. If you know anything about black bears you know that is a damn big one. He was seen often by mountain bikers and hikers and never caused any problems. But someone shot him and just left the body to rot. Bear season ended over a month ago so it wasn't even in season. The kicker for me is that if they find the person the worst that can happen is a $1,500 fine and lose your hunting license for one year. Seems a bit light doesn't it?

Of course a few years ago we also had some asshole kid go into a den and shoot a momma bear during the winter. Her 3 cubs died obviously. Relatively little punishment for that either.
 
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#15
Hunting is a big deal here. Personally, I stopped hunting when I went away to college. After college, I got into hiking. It was a lot more fun and a lot less of a hassle than hunting.
 
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#16
We also had some jackass here over the weekend who shot a 400+ pound black bear in my city's watershed area. If you know anything about black bears you know that is a damn big one. He was seen often by mountain bikers and hikers and never caused any problems. But someone shot him and just left the body to rot. Bear season ended over a month ago so it wasn't even in season. The kicker for me is that if they find the person the worst that can happen is a $1,500 fine and lose your hunting license for one year. Seems a bit light doesn't it?

Of course a few years ago we also had some asshole kid go into a den and shoot a momma bear during the winter. Her 3 cubs died obviously. Relatively little punishment for that either.
I didn't even know they had bears that big in Maryland!

But yeah, those punishments seem insanely light and stories like that always make me angry when I read them in the news. I don't really have anything against hunting, but for some reason poaching, hunting out of season, and things like that really bother me. Maybe it's because it just gives everybody who enjoys legal and responsible hunting a bad name.

A couple of years ago somebody shot a 12 or 14 point buck that was known to be in a local nature center. I cannot recall if it was with a bow or firearm but it was out of season AND in an area where hunting isn't allowed. They ended up catching the guy who did it. IIRC, the punishments in Michigan are a bit more severe and those who are found guilty can lose their hunting license and the ability to ever get one again... of course if they are out poaching in the first place, that's not likely to really deter them from poaching again later. I think our fines are higher too though.

Speaking back of bears though - there was a deer hunter in Northern Michigan this year who was tracking a buck he had shot and when he finally got close to it he saw a bear come and drag it off to their den.
 
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