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Transportation Hyperloop's $500M futuristic transport test & certification facilities to be built in West Virgina

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Q. What is the (still-theoretical) HYPERLOOP of the future?

A. It's a transportation system of magnetically levitating pods that would carry passengers & cargo through a nearly-airless transit tube at ultra-fast speeds with minimal air pollution. The theoretical maximum speed would be 700 miles-per-hour.

The following video is "Hyperloop Explained"; The first 4 minutes can be skipped, as the Virgin Hyperloop system begins at @ 4' :

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Snippets from: https://techcrunch.com/2020/10/08/v...gy-at-new-west-virginia-certification-center/

Before now, Virgin Hyperloop has been developing and testing its hyperloop technology at its full-scale proving ground in North Las Vegas. The company created a 500-meter long “development loop” for running its tests, and performed its first full-scale system test in 2017. This new [West Virginia] facility will be used specifically for certification, but will involve similar large-scale systems testing and involve “thousands” of new jobs created, according to the company.
Virgin Hyperloop ultimately hopes to fully safety certify its system by 2025, and then ultimately enter into commercial operation with a real system by 2030, if all goes well.

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Snippets from: https://www.reuters.com/article/vir...est-high-speed-transport-system-idUSKBN26U08Y

Federal regulators will use the center, and accompanying six-mile test track, to establish regulatory and safety standards, while Virgin will test its product and infrastructure.

The announcement comes less than three months after the Transportation Department published guidance on a regulatory framework for U.S. hyperloop systems.

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Slideshow of renderings of West Virginia facility:

 
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michaelskis

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I think it is beyond theoretical at this point. The test facility in AZ has shown that it can work and a 100 mile line is under construction in India.


I was in a presentation that indicated that they are planning a route that would connect Raleigh to Washington DC, and then extend it up to coast with stops in Philly, NYC, and Boston.
 
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I think it is beyond theoretical at this point. The test facility in AZ has shown that it can work and a 100 mile line is under construction in India.

Thank you, michaelskis, for bringing up that point.

The Hyperloop is definitely beyond theoretical in one sense:
Test speeds of up to 245 miles per hour could be reached at the Virgin Hyperloop One facility that had been built near Las Vegas, Nevada.
Details were described in an article from one year ago:

India is indeed likely have the first Hyperloop system up and running:

The project will begin with a demonstration track — which a feasibility study is underway for — followed by the implementation of a fully operational route.
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The Hyperloop of the future, however, is still theoretical; the ultimate speed goal is nearly 700 miles per hour:
Q. What is the (still-theoretical) HYPERLOOP of the future?

A. It's a transportation system of magnetically levitating pods that would carry passengers & cargo through a nearly-airless transit tube at ultra-fast speeds with minimal air pollution. The theoretical maximum speed would be 700 miles-per-hour.

The new West Virgina site described in my first post will be testing Virgin Hyperloop pods at 600 miles per hour or faster.
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My apologies if I looked like I was shouting when I italicized and bolded the data. It was perhaps an over-zealous attempt to emphasize the technology and the different speeds of the pods.
 
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Last Sunday, November 15, 2020:
Virgin Hyperloop became the first company to conduct a human test of the technology at its 500-meter test track in a desert town just north of Las Vegas.
The two volunteers, wearing casual street clothes, were whisked in a pod that was levitated by magnets inside a vacuum tube to 107 m.p.h. in 6.25 seconds.
 
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February 11, 2021

Virgin Hyperloop unveils their passenger experience vision, set to stir travel

"Virgin Hyperloop has unveiled visuals of its revolutionised passenger experience through pod interiors and terminals for its hyperloop network, seeking to transform terrestrial travel."

Though each vehicle can carry only up to 28 passengers, the hyperloop system... . . . will be able to commute thousands of passengers per hour through an elaborately planned network. Thanks to the high throughput, this will be made possible by convoying vehicles one behind another in the tube within seconds.

Virgin Hyperloop's new video on their vision of the passenger experience:
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Virgin Hyperloop provides more detail on W.Va. facility

Virgin Hyperloop Business Development Manager Kristen Hammer... is one of many working on the ground in West Virginia and says it will still be months before the facility breaks ground.

"This year is really us just buckling down, locking down the design, locking down the schedule, all the jobs align with that,” Hammer said. “Next year will probably be the start of construction, but it’s going to be a phased approach.”
 
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