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Identify your residency restrictions

Identify your residency restrictions

  • They tied a chain to my leg that reaches the city limits

    Votes: 7 14.9%
  • They tied a bungee cord to my waist that lets me stretch to the next town over

    Votes: 2 4.3%
  • They let me off the cord, but I gotta promise to be good.

    Votes: 3 6.4%
  • I'm FREE FREEE FREEEEEE!

    Votes: 35 74.5%

  • Total voters
    47
  • Poll closed .

hilldweller

Cyburbian
Messages
3,865
Points
23
residency requirements for municipal jobs

I have noticed that some municipalities (all in the northeast) have residency requirements for planning positions. By this I mean that you need to have an in-city address for your application to be considered. Since this is a phenomenon I have only noticed in the northeast, I wonder if it is a relic of patronage politics. I can't explain it otherwise, because it would seem to me that in order to attract the best candidates you'd want to deepen your talent pool. And couldn't an outside perspective be a good thing? Any thoughts?
 

NHPlanner

Forums Administrator & Gallery Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
9,890
Points
38
I have noticed that some municipalities (all in the northeast) have residency requirements for planning positions. By this I mean that you need to have an in-city address for your application to be considered. Since this is a phenomenon I have only noticed in the northeast, I wonder if it is a relic of patronage politics. I can't explain it otherwise, because it would seem to me that in order to attract the best candidates you'd want to deepen your talent pool. And couldn't an outside perspective be a good thing? Any thoughts?
Moderator note:

Merged a few threads dealing with this topic.
 

Queen B

Cyburbian
Messages
3,179
Points
25
I don't have any restrictions. I live in the next county. The distance I live, is closer than if I lived in the south end of the county.
 

craines

Cyburbian
Messages
578
Points
17
there are no residency requirements for the city of los angeles, and infact in my department I am one of the few who actually live within in city boundries.

I think there are the standard pros and cons to living in a space where your input will have a impact but overall I think it is not a bad idea though it should not be a part of the job requirement.
 

tsc

Cyburbian
Messages
1,905
Points
23
with the average price of a home at over 700k... who could afford a home on a planner salary?
 

Habanero

Cyburbian
Messages
3,241
Points
27
I didn't like living in the same community for which I worked, I felt like I never left the office. I don't currently have residency requirements though I can understand it for upper management in some cases (so that they can still get to work if roads are closed, etc. and are "essential staff").
 

kjel

Super Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
12,228
Points
37
When I was an undergrad I worked in the Main Street office in the city where I attended school. The position had been vacant for about 6 months and because of the busy summer season coming up I was offered an intern position for 20 hours a week. I easily settled in and helped the assistant city manager run the Main Street office which he had been doing since the post went vacant. The city hired a brash young lady whose newly minted degree was in historic preservation. She rubbed a lot of people the wrong way and didn't make it out of her probationary period and everyone at the city encouraged me to apply for the vacancy. The assistant city manager sat me down and said that although I was quite competent and qualified for the post that he wasn't going to consider me because I didn't currently live in the city. Given the opportunity and a little time I would have moved had I been able to sell the house I had at the time. He hired another lady that had been an HR manager at a manufacturing company. She moved into the office, I was dismissed via email after 9 months of employment, and then went to work for the county office next door. Within 60 days the lady he hired quit because she was offered her dream job, and he was left with a vacant office, but refused to eat crow and come talk to me even though the city manager and county manager encouraged him to do so. Served him right. On a side note most of the jobs I have seen for planning in SC don't appear to have a residency requirement, just a requirement to obtain an SC drivers license in a given time period.
 

Planit

Cyburbian
Messages
11,964
Points
38
No residency requirement here and have lived both in and out of the community I worked for.

In-town: Pros - become part of the community; Cons - you neverleave the job.
Out-town: Pros - not biased for your particular neighborhoosd; Cons - feeling of disconnection

Right now I live in the county next door. The only disadvantage is I can't take the work car home.
 

estromberg

Cyburbian
Messages
169
Points
7
I don't have any at the County, but they do at the City

We don't have any requirements for residency here in County government, but people working for the main city here in the county are required to live within the County. I have seen some places that have residency requirements when I have been looking for jobs, but they commonly were within 3-6 months of hire.
 

MacheteJames

Cyburbian
Messages
939
Points
20
No requirement here, though I chose to live here for at least a year in order to get to know the community well. I feel that I have more of a stake here as a resident... when I'm working on a downtown development initiative, I know that I'll actually be able to walk there from my place and see the results of our efforts.

This county is one of the most expensive places to live in in the whole US. I have a little apartment and could never think of owning a home around here on a planner's salary. That said, my community is one of the more affordable ones.
 

johnelsden1

Member
Messages
416
Points
13
In 23 years of working for local government, never had a residency requirement...........even in a city with average home price of 700K...............
 

The One

Cyburbian
Messages
8,289
Points
29
Nope...

Not been a requirement anywhere I've worked......I'm not convinced it would be a good policy everywhere, too many variables to consider to just have a blanket rule on this one. In the future though, I'm determined to live VERY CLOSE TO WORK!!! I guess this could be my new years resolution for the future....distant future.:r:
 

TexanOkie

Cyburbian
Messages
2,903
Points
20
I want to be able to make objective decisions. Living in the community, I find it can be possible to be less objective, as I am involved on a more personal level.
This is a prevalent philosophy with my city, and to avoid it most city staff live outside the City limits and ETJ.
 

mendelman

Unfrozen Caveman Planner
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
12,793
Points
43
Most municipalties in Chicagoland don't have residency requirements. As mentioned by other posters, it would be very limiting in terms of recruiting talent.

Plus, being such a huge area with so many munis, a planner could easily work for one muni. and live in the muni next door. :-D
 

Brocktoon

Cyburbian
Messages
3,728
Points
22
The EDC I worked for in Michigan had one although for municipal employees it was prohibited even for city managers. In DC I had to live in the city which lead to me residing in a small studio apartment. In Arizona my town does not have a residency requirements but I know of cities in the area that require employees to live in the county.
 

ruralplanner

Cyburbian
Messages
138
Points
6
No residency requirement by me. I live in one county and work for another. It has worked out well as I have been removed from issues and can better work with communities on an impartial basis. One the other hand, as the years pass, I am finding it difficult to see the progression of the county I work for compared to the one I live, where there is no county planner. If there ever would be an opportunity to work for my home county, I think I would take it —for the challenge of starting a planning program from the ground up—but also to become a contributing member of my community—not one an hour away.
 
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