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industrial sanctuary/preservation zoning

japrovo

Member
Messages
103
Points
6
Does anyone have first (or even second or third hand) experience with industrial sanctuary zoning or similar efforts to preserve industrial land from encroachment? Portland (OR) and Chicago are among well known urban examples. I would be particularly interested in regional approaches/discussions or examples from any scale places covered by growth management programs. In particular I'm looking for any comparative assessments of program elements or examples of code defining industrial use with any degree of specificity (e.g. traded versus non-traded sector industries).

Regards,
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
Messages
10,080
Points
34
I wish I could help you, but Chicago is the best model I am aware of, and you've apparently already checked it out. The issue is one that won't be of concern to many communities, unless they are experiencing significant residential growth in central areas that were once industrial. Many cities would not consider that to be a problem, as residential growth in the core is a goal in itself.
 

donk

Cyburbian
Messages
6,970
Points
30
Try the Town of Orangeville.

http://www.town.orangeville.on.ca/depts.php?aid=9

I know that there is a concern about the encroachment of residential uses in industrial areas. It is discussed in their Official Plan. They refer to the lands as "employment" lands.

(Guess there is a good thing about having lots of job interviews, you get to read lots of plans.)
 

Rem

Cyburbian
Messages
1,523
Points
23
This has been an issue in New South Wales, particularly inner and middle ring Sydney, and there is a S.117(2) direction*1 governing rezoning of industrial land. It reads as follows:

G11 Industrial Zones
Draft local environmental plans*2 shall not substantially reduce existing zonings of land for industrial development. The extent of any such alteration or reduction shall be considered from the point of view of existing land zoned for industrial development within the whole of the council's area as at 1 September 1980.

*1 - A S.117(2) direction is a direction which may be given by the Minister (for Planning of the day) to Authorities making plans (usually Councils) that "must" be adhered to. You can propose a departure from such a direction and it is within the Minister's power to grant it. The significance of the date in the direction relates to the approximate date of operation.
*2 - Our planning codes.
 

japrovo

Member
Messages
103
Points
6
Thanks all. Helpful posts. In the main US urban examples the target is residential and sometimes office encroachment on generally existing industrial areas. As it has developed our debate turns not just on encroachment but the need/wisdom of defining industrial uses in the overall regional planning scheme.

On the economic development side questions have been raised about the wisdom of attaching any strings to industrial sites, pointing to rapidly shifting demand as resistant of categorization. E.g. How does an r&d facility that looks like an office building count? On the land use planning side the question is whether broadly defined industrial lands will be used for the purpose proposed. And if not will that undermine efficient use of land within the region's urban growth boundary?

One set of ideas kicking around turns on defining industrial use either more broadly say as employment lands or more narrowly focusing on traded sector jobs. Thoughts on that?
 

Lee Nellis

Cyburbian
Messages
1,369
Points
29
From what I have seen of Portland, it seems like "industrial" might not be as accurate or useful a way of zoning things as more functional or neighborhood based zoning. The corridor along the river with the airport, etc. seems like one environment that happens to include a lot industrial uses, but also includes marinas, etc. And while I think the ones I have seem may be in suburbs, there are also the more conventional light industrial area, which tend to include some commercial uses (depending on how you define the two terms). Overall, given its strong visual and landscape character, I would think you'd use a neighborhood approach in Portland. This would allow for a range of uses, but control encroachment.
 
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