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Grad / masters International Program, Thailand

clwitsell

Member
Messages
25
Points
2
Hi all,

Been a long time since I've been here, but happy to be welcomed back. I graduated in '15 from a public university in NC with urban planning and geography focus. Fast forward, I'm in Southeast Asia teaching english and aching to go back to my studies for transportation and urban planning. I applied to a international program in Bangkok (KMUTT- King Mongkut's University of Technology Thonburi) in the School of Architecture and Design, Master's in Urban Management. I got in for fall of '20 and clearly I delayed due to international relocation issues. And now I'm considering a fall '21 start to my studies.

For now, I'd like to know the international applicability of my degree and possibility for me to take this degree outside of thailand and it hold a decently respectable rating. Say for example, I return to the US and look to use it for employment purposes or furthering studies. Keeping in mind, I do have work over a years worth of internship experience in Urban planning with a small-midsize local government municipality.

Thanks in advance.
 

The One

Cyburbian
Messages
8,289
Points
30
I've worked with Canadian, Nigerian, Iranian, and hired an Egyptian planner in the past. I think you'll be fine.
 

glutton

Cyburbian
Messages
473
Points
12
Personally I'd caution against it if you want to return to work in the U.S., especially since most Americans/American employers are not familiar with international schools. My friend did her planning master's in London (from a prestigious, well known school throughout the world) and still had issues with her job search in the U.S. upon return. Thailand would be even harder. But if you network enough and are more patient with your job search, you may be able to rely on your previous experience and education. Was your undergrad degree from a PAB accredited planning program, or was it a general 'urban studies' type of program?
 

clwitsell

Member
Messages
25
Points
2
Personally I'd caution against it if you want to return to work in the U.S., especially since most Americans/American employers are not familiar with international schools. My friend did her planning master's in London (from a prestigious, well known school throughout the world) and still had issues with her job search in the U.S. upon return. Thailand would be even harder. But if you network enough and are more patient with your job search, you may be able to rely on your previous experience and education. Was your undergrad degree from a PAB accredited planning program, or was it a general 'urban studies' type of program?
Thank you both for your input.
I'm leaning to believe that my experience in studying there will have me dabbling in issues unique to the region, but theory wise very western. Would this set me up more suited for private sector work?

The program I got my undergrad with was actually a common geography studies program with focus in urban planning and GIS. So to answer your question, no it is not PAB accredited.
 

OfficialPlanner

Cyburbian
Messages
942
Points
24
Generally - it doesn't hurt to go to school in the region you would like to work. For one, the alumni networks are usually pretty strong.

It's also been said tongue-in-cheek that experience trumps degrees, but as time passes, where you went to school is less important than the actual work experience.
 

glutton

Cyburbian
Messages
473
Points
12
@clwitsell if you're truly set on working abroad in Asia/Thailand, then a degree from a Thai university might work really well for you. If, however, life happens and you want to come back eventually or you marry another American who wants to come back, just know that it will be a little harder. But who knows, in some places in the U.S. (particularly, NYC/Washington DC), there are lots of (albeit, super competitive) opportunities to continue doing international work.

Also, to fund your master's degree abroad, I highly recommend looking into the Fulbright U.S. Student Program! Since Fulbright is a U.S. State department sponsored program, it holds weight in the U.S. context even if the experience is actually abroad. So it's a nice best of both worlds situation. Good luck!
 
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