Environment 🍃 Invasive bamboo plant becoming major crisis in U.S., world

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Moderators:
At first glance, this would appear to belong in the Environmental Planning Forum.
The invasive "running" variety of bamboo plant, however, has become a widespread and extremely costly crisis that now affects almost all aspects of planning throughout the U.S. and the world. Ergo, I've started this thread in the Make No Small Plans Forum.

For three decades I've been familiar with environmental and planning issues concerning invasive running yellow bamboo, (which is non-native to all areas but Asia). I was "kickstarted" into beginning this thread after reading this WSJ article:
http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=...Pw_F8H7Rsncp2zw&bvm=bv.51773540,d.dmg&cad=rja

I believe that there needs to be rapid widespread public awareness campaigns regarding this exponentially harmful and costly problem.
As of this post, the New York Times has yet to write a recent news article on the subject--just one example of the derth of awareness concerning this matter's urgency.

Laws need to be very quickly passed regarding bamboo plant growth and sale in: the entirety of the U.S., most of Canada, and every other area of the world where it acts as invasive weed.

Asking Cyburbians to post planning issues regarding these invasive bamboo plants, as well as examples of laws/ordinances that are being proposed or written, or have already gone into effect.

Is your fair city or town writing an ordinance @invasive bamboo plants?
If not, why not?
 
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mgk920

Cyburbian
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Exotic invasive species are a real problem here, too. And not just plants like yellow bamboo, but purple loosestrife, buckthorn, honeysuckles, phragmites and so forth, insects (ie, gypsy moths, emerald ash borers, etc) and other 'nasties' such as zebra mussels, various other exotic freshwater fish, the Dutch elm disease fungus and the chestnut blight. Yes, many of the now invasive plant species here were first sold as ornamentals.

Phragmites are rapidly taking over roadsides, especially along the freeways, here in the Appleton area.

Of these, IMHO, most destructive was the chestnut blight - until just over a century ago, one out of every four trees in its native range, which was most of the eastern USA and parts of southeastern Canada, was an American chestnut. The blight fungus was accidentally introduced into NYC (it was first identified in the Bronx Zoo) from Europe in 1903 and by WWII, the trees were nearly all gone. Work is underway to cross-breed American chestnuts with blight resistance genes (see: http://www.acf.org/ ).

Locally right now, we are under a quarantine for firewood, this to try to slow the spread of the ash borers.

Mike
 
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Thank you, MIke. I retrieved the Appleton, Wisconsin municode pdf:
http://www.wildones.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/municode1.pdf

Articles on Vegetation are in Chapter 21, (starting on page 1381).

Definition of a "Public Nuisance" regarding vegetation:
The continued existence of injured or diseased
trees or other plantings, or the failure to properly treat the
same if treatment is available, which is likely to cause the
spread of disease or endanger persons because of the
deteriorated condition, is hereby declared to be a public
nuisance requiring abatement.

(Code 1965, §13.05; Ord 169-11, §1, 8-9-11)
This definition doesn't include the planting of invasive vegetation.

Mike, are invasive vegetation ordinances in another section of this pdf?
Also, is the selling of invasive vegetation in another section?

 

ColoGI

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Seana;693531 Laws need to be [I said:
very quickly[/I] passed regarding bamboo plant growth and sale in: the entirety of the U.S., most of Canada, and every other area of the world where it acts as invasive weed.

Asking Cyburbians to post planning issues regarding these invasive bamboo plants, as well as examples of laws/ordinances that are being proposed or written, or have already gone into effect.

Is your fair city or town writing an ordinance @invasive bamboo plants?
If not, why not?

Much more harmful plants out here than bamboo. Every place in the United States and Canada has a problem with some sort of invasive pest. This is not new.
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
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I believe that those are handled at the state level here in Wisconsin, although there is a 'noxious weeds' ordinance elsewhere in the city code.

Mike

Correct. The DNR maintains a list of invasive plants that should be eradicated and may not be sold. In Appleton we addressed it on page 96 of the Comprehensive Plan:

Appleton's forestry program manages the urban forest in part to slow down, if not prevent the spread of exot-ic pests and diseases that could damage or destroy trees. These often target specific species, such as the populations of chestnuts and elm trees that have been decimated in the past. Current threats include gypsy moths, the emerald ash borer, and oak wilt rot. Besides pests and disease, there are a number of exotic or invasive plant species that threaten the region's native plants and habitats. When invasive plants or animals enter an ecosystem they may alter it radically, resulting in diminished biodiversity and potentially impacting animals that rely on that habitat. The problem can become more serious when invasive species cause damage to property or infrastructure. Governments and private property owners can spend substantial sums in an effort to control these plants and animals. For that reason, the first priority is to prevent their introduction and spread through the environment.

There is an extensive list of invasive plants on page 99.
 

banBambooNow

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Bamboo Invasions in Maryland

Several cities in MD have passed laws to restrict running bamboo. Cambridge, College Park, Tacoma Park & Cumberland. Connecticut's law is effective 10/1/2013. It's also banned and/or restricted in many Long Island communities. Despite extensive proof that running bamboo is invasive and destructive, Maryland will be repeating a lot of the existing research (anything to spend more tax money) before deciding whether or not to make it a Tier I noxious weed like Kudzu. If and when this happens, we may finally be able to hold the planters of Damnboo financially responsible for the damages it causes to neighboring properties. That will be a shock to the people who planted it without a barrier because they thought it was a cheap privacy screen.

For more info on this subject:

https://sites.google.com/site/invasivebambooresearch/
https://www.facebook.com/runawaybamboomd?ref=hl#!/InstituteOfInvasiveBambooResearch
https://www.facebook.com/runawaybamboomd?ref=hl
 
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. . . .Connecticut's law is effective 10/1/2013. . . .
Text (pdf) of ^this^ State law:
http://www.cga.ct.gov/2013/ACT/PA/2013PA-00082-R00SB-01016-PA.htm

Snippets:
(b) No person who plants running bamboo or who allows running bamboo to be planted on his or her property shall permit such bamboo to grow beyond the boundaries of his or her property. On and after October 1, 2013, any person who violates the provisions of this subsection shall be liable for any damages caused to any neighboring property by such bamboo, including, but not limited to, the cost of removal of any running bamboo that grew beyond the boundaries of his or her property.
(c) No person shall plant running bamboo or allow running bamboo to be planted on his or her property at a location that is one hundred feet or less from any abutting property or public right-of-way unless such planting is contained by a properly constructed and maintained barrier system or such running bamboo is planted above ground in a container or planter such that the running bamboo does not come in contact with the surrounding soil. Any person who violates the provisions of this subsection shall be fined one hundred dollars. In the case of a continuing violation, each day of continuance shall be deemed a separate and distinct offense until such time as such bamboo is removed or contained by a properly installed and constructed barrier system. The provisions of this subsection shall not be deemed to apply to any running bamboo planted on or before October 1, 2013.
(d) Each retail seller or installer of running bamboo shall provide to each customer who purchases running bamboo from such seller or installer a statement that discloses that running bamboo is a fast growing plant that may spread if not properly contained and a plain language summary of the provisions contained in subsections (b) and (c) of this section. Such statement shall also provide recommendations, based on best available information, on how to properly contain running bamboo. Any retail seller or installer of running bamboo who violates the provisions of this subsection shall be fined one hundred dollars for each plant sold in violation of this section.
(e) The Department of Energy and Environmental Protection, any duly authorized municipal constable, municipal tree warden, zoning enforcement officer or inland wetlands and watercourses enforcement officer may enforce the provisions of subsections (c) and (d)...


________________________________________


. . . The DNR maintains a list of invasive plants that should be eradicated and may not be sold. In Appleton we addressed it on page 96 of the Comprehensive Plan.
. . .
. . . Besides pests and disease, there are a number of exotic or invasive plant species that threaten the region's native plants and habitats. When invasive plants or animals enter an ecosystem they may alter it radically, resulting in diminished biodiversity and potentially impacting animals that rely on that habitat. The problem can become more serious when invasive species cause damage to property or infrastructure. Governments and private property owners can spend substantial sums in an effort to control these plants and animals. For that reason, the first priority is to prevent their introduction and spread through the environment.

There is an extensive list of invasive plants on page 99.
Cardinal
At this time, my Carpal-Tunnel ailment prevents me from doing a search to retrieve Appleton's Comprehensive Plan--specifically to view the list of invasive plants on Page 99. Would you provide a direct link, if possible? Thanks in advance.
smile1.png
 
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Cardinal

Cyburbian
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Text (pdf) of ^this^ State law:
http://www.cga.ct.gov/2013/ACT/PA/2013PA-00082-R00SB-01016-PA.htm

Snippets:


________________________________________


Cardinal
At this time, my Carpal-Tunnel ailment prevents me from doing a search to retrieve Appleton's Comprehensive Plan--specifically to view the list of invasive plants on Page 99. Would you provide a direct link, if possible? Thanks in advance.
smile1.png

You will find it here: http://www.appleton.org/departments...tment=5779708f00c1&subdepartment=c6defedbc25c

It is in Chapter 8.
 

kms

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Municipalities in my county are starting to ban bamboo.

I know a farmer who's trying to establish bamboo in old pastures to provide wildlife cover. He got angry when I protested.
 

imaplanner

Cyburbian
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There is no effort to ban or limit running bamboo where I am. We have a hard enough time limiting and restricting the dumping of chemicals in our rivers and wetlands. I don't think a ban wouold go over very well because of like Freedoms and the United Nations and communism. It hasn't been a huge problem on people's properties so far only on public lands where it's been taking over.
 

onebuccaneer

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There needs to be a law!

Nothing is being done in Florida either. When I inquired I was informed "it was not on their radar."

Beginning in 2008 my husband and I dug rhizomes each season for 3 years in an attempt to keep our neighbor's uncontained running bamboo off our property. We finally realized the futility of it, and we paid 3,000 dollars to have a 75 foot steel-reinforced concrete barrier installed 41 inches deep into the ground. Barriers do NOT work for long.
My husband injured his knee from the constant digging and had to have a knee replacement. We cannot plant anything on that side of our property for fear of losing it to the bamboo rhizomes, and we have lost the free use and enjoyment of our property. Once a grove of bamboo becomes mature the only way to rid your property of it is to bring in heavy equipment to remove the underground rhizomes.
We live in Spring Hill, Florida and I have photos of Phyllostachys aurea (Golden Bamboo) growing up through the asphalt of roadways and parking lots, under the siding of homes, through concrete, and under sidewalks. I have seen bamboo that lifted up a concrete slab at a home we almost purchased in Virginia. I also have photos of bamboo growing through the plastic barriers that are touted as being able to keep it in check. Barriers are only a temporary fix.
There are many people making big money selling this stuff! If you listen to them you will be told that all you have to do is mow it or kick the new culms over in the spring. The mowing will keep it at bay for awhile but after the bamboo matures nothing will keep it back. If your neighbor is cultivating it you will never be able to rid your property of it. At the very least we need city ordinances or an enforceable nuisance ordinance to protect all residential property owners from the destruction caused by Invasive Asian Exotic Plants many of which have no natural enemies and are free to spread unchecked.
 
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-bump-
December, 2019
From U.K. edition of Country Living:
Brits are being urged to stop planting bamboo
in their gardens

According to Environet UK, the invasive plant could rival Japanese Knotweed, as many homeowners are unaware most species [of bamboo] are intrusive if left alone.
Bamboo has not been banned completely [in Great Britain] and there are still some ways to grow the plant if you wish to.
Managing director of Environet UK, Nic Seal:
"Bamboo is a vigorous and fast-growing plant that has been steadily growing in popularity in the UK over the last decade or so, but it's very difficult to contain and virtually impossible to kill with herbicide."
 

bureaucrat#3

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131
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8
I love the look of bamboo, especially giant running varieties. At an old house, I was so tempted to use it block neighbors who were up the hill behind our back yard. A fence wasn't tall enough and trees were so slow. I just couldn't bring myself to plant it know it would take over. I've seen runners here crawl out of planters, metal tubs and under sidewalks. Some landscapers have moved to selling clumping bamboo which is slower but still hard to kill and can become invasive.

Growing up we had patches of native river cane we used for fishing poles, quick fence supports and a few other things. I had a college folklore class where one of the main projects was harvesting, striping, dying and weaving a cane basket.
 
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