• Ongoing coronavirus / COVID-19 discussion: how is the pandemic affecting your community, workplace, and wellness? 🦠

    Working from home? So are we. Come join us! Cyburbia is a friendly big tent, where we share our experiences and thoughts about urban planning practice, planning adjacent topics, and whatever else comes to mind. No ads, no spam, no social distancing.

Information / data Is it possible to map out income based on employment rather than population?

Doberman

Cyburbian
Messages
209
Points
9
I know this is a bit nuanced. Typically we see heat maps of income based on where people live by census tract. Is it possible to create and/or analyze income level based within a geographic area based solely on employment rather than population?

The reason I ask this, is if you were working to recruit some kind of retailer or restaurant into a Downtown area, office park where most of the employees are commuters, their market demographic could be based on the income level and/or employment density rather than just income and/or population density.
 

DVD

Cyburbian
Messages
14,948
Points
51
You might be able to do a location quotient to determine a high level of retail or other specific business type.

Whatever state department that deals with business taxes might have records of the amount of tax revenue generated in areas.

There is also the business census.
 

Faust_Motel

Cyburbian
Messages
648
Points
27
I'd look for your state bureau of labor statistics. You can probably get numbers for "covered employment" (Those who pay into the unemployment insurance system) at the municipality level and get an idea of average wage by industry. I can get somethign that looks like this where I work: covemp.png

Then, you might be able to make some educated inferences about the office park or catchment area for the downtown.
 

Doberman

Cyburbian
Messages
209
Points
9
I'd look for your state bureau of labor statistics. You can probably get numbers for "covered employment" (Those who pay into the unemployment insurance system) at the municipality level and get an idea of average wage by industry. I can get somethign that looks like this where I work: View attachment 48765

Then, you might be able to make some educated inferences about the office park or catchment area for the downtown.

I think that would be exactly what I need. Are you able to drill down into city and zip code based on that? What's the source of the website you posted if you don't mind me asking, without revealing the city.
 

Faust_Motel

Cyburbian
Messages
648
Points
27
I think that would be exactly what I need. Are you able to drill down into city and zip code based on that? What's the source of the website you posted if you don't mind me asking, without revealing the city.
 

WSU MUP Student

Cyburbian
Messages
10,580
Points
46
You might also want to look at the Census Bureau's LEHD and LODES data. These track where workers work and where workers live down to the block level. The breakdowns of workers by wage level are pretty basic but the commuting patterns data can give you a good sense of how many people work in the geography you are studying, how many earn more than $XXXX/mo, where they are commuting from, etc. You can download the complete dataset for your state from the Bureau's annual planning database (the 2018 figures were just published in the 2020 data a couple of weeks ago) or you can use the Bureau's OnTheMap web application to get quite a bit of information for whichever geography you are studying (or you can draw your own polygon or upload a shapefile). The data in these programs comes primarily from employer weekly unemployment insurance filings.

As an example, the below map is a profile of where workers who earn $1,251/mo - $3,333/mo work within the city of boulder, CO:

1597938253523.png

This one shows the basic commuting info for that same segment of the workforce:
1597938407132.png

So of the 23,000 workers in the city earning between $1,251/mo and $3,333 a month, nearly 5,500 of them live within the city and 17.5k commute in from outside the city. This type of information might be useful if you are trying to focus on the lunch crowd or the early evening dinner crowd.

If you aren't familiar with the LEHD data and OnTheMap, it's got a lot of good information.
 
Top