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Just go and rename it Car and Conservative Driver, okay?

Dan

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At one time, Car and Driver was one of the best automobile-related magazines in the United States. The writing was brilliant and witty, the reviews honest and relevant, the presentation intended for a higher common denominator.

I still think the writing has a certain intelligen wit about it. The reviews are as honest as ever. However, in the past few years, though, Car and Driver seems to be sliding towards the same path that AM radio followed in the 1990s.

Car and Driver is becoming ... blatantly conservative.

In every copy in the past couple of years, there has been one or more jabs at various Democrats, Bill Clinton, "environmentalist lefties," and the like. Patrick Bedard, in the September 2003 edition, write an editorial about the poor quality of AM and FM radio reception in modern cars. This seems like it's an apolotical subject. Wanna' bet?

"Besides, clearing the static between me and NPR's Daniel Schorr wouldn't make him sound any less of a relic from the LBJ years."

"Most of my miles unroll through through fringe America where Radio Free Michael Medved is tolerably clear one day and lost in the buzz for the rest of the week."


Is this necessary for a discussion regarding the quality of radio reception? What next ... giving Dubya credit for recent design innovations at Cadillac?

I'll admit, since my politics lean towards the left, I probably wouldn't be complaining if Bedard, Yates and the rest heaped praise upon Ralph Nader or Howard Dean. However, there are publications that already do that ... the Utne Reader, and the liberal wonk-zines.

Conservative author P.J. O'Rourke, during his C&D days in the 1980s, seldom ventured much into rightie politics in his prose. Why now, though? Why does Car and Driver have to take any sort of political slant? Why to the right? Don't they know that they're alienating many of their readers?
 
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