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Law School & Planning

thewholething

Member
Messages
16
Points
1
I was speaking to the Town Planner that is hiring me over the summer to be a student worker. He told me that with time, I'll get the hang of the acronyms and "planning jargon."- including legal terms and such.

So, after our conversation, I started thinking about Grad School...yet again. I remember that Hunter College has a dual degree program with Brooklyn Law School- a Master's in planning and a law degree with a concentration related to planning. When the time comes to apply, I'm not ruling out this option.

BUT, my only question is, how realistic is this? I know there are people that have dual degrees, but I don't know anyone personally who does.

If there's anyone out there that knows about this, or knows somebody that went for a dual degree, reply back.

Thanks!
 

Cullen

Member
Messages
33
Points
2
Yes, I'm really interested in this option as well. I would be interested in hearing about how helpful degrees such as these would be in the field of planning and other closely related fields, such as local government, higher levels of government, private sector consulting, legal practice, or land developement.
 

Repo Man

Cyburbian
Messages
2,550
Points
25
I think if you go this route, your employment prospects would skew towards the private sector (land use law or a consultant). Maybe a large city would also have a use for a planner/lawyer.

I also think that while your skills would be very valuable to a planning department, you may price yourself out of the salary range available.
 

OhioPlanner

Cyburbian
Messages
304
Points
11
Ohio State offers a dual degree in law and city and regional planning. We have a number of students who have taken advantage of this degree option.

Most of the students who go with this option wind up working in local governments as city attorneys or for private sector law firms who specialize in development law.
 

GeogPlanner

Cyburbian
Messages
1,433
Points
25
be careful because these joint programs often require matricualtion in the law school first and you can't apply into the program once you start degree progress on the planning side of the program :-( i got burned by such...the agreement was being finalized when i was applying to schools and started the planning tract understanding that i could get into the law program once the agreement was done.
 

yaff

Cyburbian
Messages
108
Points
6
I had an undergraduate degree in biology and did the law degree first. I emphasized land use and environmental law and graduated in 1993 I returned to graduate school in 1998 and got a masters in Urban and Regional Planning in 2000. We relocated out to the east coast this summer for my husband's job and I have been looking for work opportunities in this area. I have been doing a little bit of attorney contract work in interum, however, I am still looking for more stable opportunities. I have been looking at federal government positions, local government, regional and county governments, non-profit organizations and consulting firms. I have also approached a few law firms but nothing solid yet. Jobs I have held previously included working for State programs regulating incorporations of municipalities, annexations, etc.; working for a private consulting firm; and working as a Sr. Planner for a large urban county planning department. I have have found the job market to be pretty tough over the years. It has been difficult to find good/interesting job opportunities and many seem to say or feel that I am "over qualified". However, The reaction I always seem to get when talking to people about my job searches is along the lines of, "What a wonderful combination of skills and experience. I am sure there must be a lot of opportunities out there for you."
 
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