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L'chaim! Jews raise property values?

Dan

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South of the suburb where I am now living is the City of Beachwood, Ohio.

Beachwood has a variety of housing, ranging from small ranch houses to McMansions. Unlike the rest of the Cleveland area, though, housing in Beachwood is very expensive for what you get: about $150 to $250 a square foot, compared to half that in Cleveland's other suburbs. An older two bedroom, one bathroom, 1,200 square foot house in Beachwood will set one back $180K or so, compared to $100K to $130K elsewhere.

Why? I've been told it was because Beachwood is populated almost entirely by religious reform and conservative Jews. Cleveland is blessed with a large Jewish population, most living in the city's eastern suburbs. Apparently, demand is extremely high among some for living in a city that is populated almost entirely by their peers, with nary a BVM shrine, Christmas tree, or roadside cross to be seen.

There are other suburbs of Cleveland with large Jewish populations and close proximity to synagoguges, Judaica stores, Kosher restaurants and other related businesses, such as South Euclid, University Heights, Lyndhurst, Pepper Pike and parts of Cleveland Heights, but Beachwood is considered the chosen place to live. Those other areas have a large Jewish population, but there's also a good number of goyim living among them; Beachwood, however, is almost exclusively Jewish. Is there such a premium on other middle-income Jewish areas elsewhere in the country? What about other ethnic or religious groups?
 

donk

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In Toronto it is Forest Hills, 4th wealthiest political riding in the country. Other neighbourhoods along Bathurst are the same(basically 10-15km km strip of Jewish neighbourhoods)

Don't forget that for certain holy days, you MUST walk to service, so location plays an important choice in where you live, combine that with specialty shopping and limited properties and demand will outstrip supply and prices will increase.

Plus don't forget about all of the Dr's, lawyers and diamond dealers. ;)
 

Mud Princess

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On the opposite end of the spectrum is the Village of Kiryas Joel, founded in Orange County, NY in the 1970s by a group of Hasidic Jews from Brooklyn.

According to the 2000 Census, Kiryas Joel has 13,000 residents with a median age of 15 (!), an average household size of 5.74, and a per capita income of just $4,355. Of course, the housing values are relatively high, given the proximity to the NY metropolitan area... though I don't see how anyone can afford housing, with these income levels.
 

Dan

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donk said:
In Toronto it is Forest Hills, 4th wealthiest political riding in the country. Other neighbourhoods along Bathurst are the same(basically 10-15km km strip of Jewish neighbourhoods)

Don't forget that for certain holy days, you MUST walk to service, so location plays an important choice in where you live, combine that with specialty shopping and limited properties and demand will outstrip supply and prices will increase.
True. But ... University Heights is the center of Jewish-related retail uses; kosher food stores, restaurants, Judaica stores, and so on. Beachwood has more Jewish institutions, like the JCC, Hebrew schools, libraries, and so on. However, houses in University Heights are much cheaper per square foot than in Beachwood, which is right next door. Because UH has a more Conservative and Orthodox population, I would imagine that being within walking distance to synagogues, mikvehs, being inside an eruv, and so on would be even more important than in areas where the practitioners are more liberal. Beachwood's Reform Jews can drive to temple on Saturday; I see fewer pedestrians there than in the other 'burbs.

Beachwood has a predominantly Reform and Conservative population; the city has fought to keep Orthodox congregations out. I also can't imagine that all the most popular synagogues would be in one community. The Jewish population gets more Conservative and Orthodox as one moves east from Beachwood deeper into inner ring suburbs, but it also becomes more diluted with non-Jews. Like I said, Beachwood is almost entirely Jewish; the city's streets and houses are dark during Christmas.

The only difference I can see is that Beachwood is about 90% Jewish, the other suburbs where there is a large Jewish community (Lyndhurst, where I now live; Pepper Pike, Shaker Heights, South Euclid, University Heights and Cleveland Heights) don't have such a high concentration. Thus ...

1) Jews raise property values. L'chiam! or ...
2) Christians lower property values. Mary Mother of God!

The Jewish Federation of Greater Cleveland has a good summary of Cleveland's Jewish geography online.
 

Dan

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I'm giving this a bumpie.

For what it's worth, I'm considering University Heights and a primarily Orthodox neighborhood in Cleveland Heights when I buy a house here. I'd be the shabbat goy!
 

Michele Zone

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Dan said:
I'd be the shabbat goy!
Okay, revealing my vast ignorance: what does "shabbat goy" mean?^o)

Off the cuff hypothesis based on absolutely no research whatsoever: As I understand it, Jews tend to be more educated on average than average for other populations -- and I don't just mean the credentialed kind of education. A rigorous education generally leads to folks who are better-off financially, take better care of their property, etc. Well-kept property will have a higher value than property with more ordinary upkeep standards, all other things being equal.

Okay: let the free-for-all on my generally ignorant comments begin! ;-) 8-! :-D :p
 

donk

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Michele Zone said:
Okay, revealing my vast ignorance: what does "shabbat goy" mean?^o)

Off the cuff hypothesis based on absolutely no research whatsoever: As I understand it, Jews tend to be more educated on average than average for other populations -- and I don't just mean the credentialed kind of education. A rigorous education generally leads to folks who are better-off financially, take better care of their property, etc. Well-kept property will have a higher value than property with more ordinary upkeep standards, all other things being equal.

Okay: let the free-for-all on my generally ignorant comments begin! ;-) 8-! :-D :p
"Literally a 'Sabbath gentile'. Before the introduction of modern conveinces, religious Jewish families hired a non-Jew who would come to their home on Sabbath morning to light the stove, since they were forbidden to do so. The system has all but disappeared, but there are still some families in Israel nd in Orthodox areas of the US who keep it going". From 1201 Questions and Answers about Judaism.

There are so many things to say about the second paragraph...


For what it's worth, I'm considering University Heights and a primarily Orthodox neighborhood in Cleveland Heights when I buy a house here. I'd be the shabbat goy!
Go for it. The bakeries will be the best in town, so will the pizza, as long as you like it vegetarian. The grocery stores will be the cleanest you've ever seen and the produce also tends to be fresher and better. Maybe you'll be able to meet a nice reform girl or a rebel to take home to bubie. ;)
 

Michele Zone

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donk said:
"Literally a 'Sabbath gentile'. Before the introduction of modern conveinces, religious Jewish families hired a non-Jew who would come to their home on Sabbath morning to light the stove, since they were forbidden to do so. The system has all but disappeared, but there are still some families in Israel nd in Orthodox areas of the US who keep it going". From 1201 Questions and Answers about Judaism.

There are so many things to say about the second paragraph...
Thank you, donk. Informative, as always. When you have the time, I would love to be Enlightened with your comments about "the second paragraph". :)
 

donk

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Michele Zone said:
Thank you, donk. Informative, as always. When you have the time, I would love to be Enlightened with your comments about "the second paragraph". :)
I did not mean it in a derogatory way, there are just so many responses. I could fill pages with the limited amount that I know and understand and people much better than me have answered and reviewed these items.

For some light and easy reading about the second paragraph check out any of Wil Eisner's graphic novels. (Name of the Game, A Contract with God, Fagin the Jew....)
 

Michele Zone

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donk said:
I did not mean it in a derogatory way, there are just so many responses. I could fill pages with teh limited amount that I know and undertand and people much better than me have answered and reviewed these items.

For some light and easy reading about the second paragraph check out any of Wil Eisner's graphic novels. (Name of the Game, A Contract with God, Fagin the Jew....)
I did not take it as derogatory. I don't know why you think I did. :-\ And I don't really have time (nor sufficient interest) to go reading a few books on the subject. Mostly, I am wondering if you basically agree or fundamentally disagree.^o)
 
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