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Humor 🤣 Let's give NUMTOTS the vapors

DVD

Cyburbian
Messages
15,347
Points
52
I'm just here to confuse the numtots. I live in a fine suburban house in a cul-de-sac, but I take the bus to work. How is this possible?
 

Dan

Dear Leader
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
19,087
Points
70
OOH! OOH! OOH! Can I play?

parking.jpg

You never know what's going to happen on Black Friday.

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Don't you hate fake dormers?

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Authentic Italian cuisine, FREE BREADSTICKS!, and plentiful parking.

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At least it's the 310 area code.

applebees.jpg

Eatin' good in the neighborhood.

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This neighborhood.

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I'll just leave a happy middle class white family here.

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Karen and Doug are so proud of Kayden! Live laugh love!

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Moses only parted the Red Sea. Robert Moses parted neighborhoods in New York City!
 

Dan

Dear Leader
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
19,087
Points
70
Who says we have to limit it to static photos?
















(Disclaimer: I do not endorse any of this as examples of best practice in urban planning.)
 

DVD

Cyburbian
Messages
15,347
Points
52
I just saw something on CBS Sunday Morning praising the engineering marvel of "The Stack" in LA
 

Doohickie

Cyburbian
Messages
3,428
Points
46
New York State Thruway at Maryvale Drive (now the Kensington Expressway) in Cheektowaga, NY. There were actually several houses that remained inside the cloverleaf at first. I attended Maryvale Elementary School near the right edge of the picture, a little above center.

You can see the homes in the cloverleaf on Historic Aerials. Search for "14225" (the zip code) and the interchange will be at the top of the frame. Look at aerial views from 1966 and prior and you can see the homes in the interchange. This piecture is from the early 1960s. By 1963 you can see in Historic Aerials some of the land behind the elementary school had already been acquired for the expressway. There are no indications of that yet in this picture (although it could could be just off frame). By 1966 the expressway construction was apparent in Historic Aerials and the homes were still there but obviously about to be demo'ed.
 
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jsk1983

Cyburbian
Messages
2,487
Points
24
New York State Thruway at Maryvale Drive (now the Kensington Expressway) in Cheektowaga, NY. There were actually several houses that remained inside the cloverleaf at first. I attended Maryvale Elementary School near the right edge of the picture, a little above center.

You can see the homes in the cloverleaf on Historic Aerials. Search for "14225" (the zip code) and the interchange will be at the top of the frame. Look at aerial views from 1966 and prior and you can see the homes in the interchange. This piecture is from the early 1960s. By 1963 you can see in Historic Aerials some of the land behind the elementary school had already been acquired for the expressway. There are no indications of that yet in this picture (although it could could be just off frame). By 1966 the expressway construction was apparent in Historic Aerials and the homes were still there but obviously about to be demo'ed.
Given the age of the houses surrounding the expressway I assume some were only standing a few years until eminent domain came a knocking?
 

Doohickie

Cyburbian
Messages
3,428
Points
46
Given the age of the houses surrounding the expressway I assume some were only standing a few years until eminent domain came a knocking?
That would be my guess. They were knocked down when I was a little kid and before I was aware of such things. I don't really remember Maryvale Drive going through; I just remember the Kensington Expressway.
 

Dan

Dear Leader
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
19,087
Points
70
Given the age of the houses surrounding the expressway I assume some were only standing a few years until eminent domain came a knocking?
EDIT: a few more details.

The route of the future New York State Thruway (the 90) was fixed in 1944. However, construction on the highway wouldn't begin for about 8-10 more years. A 1946 plan for arterial roads in the Buffalo area set out the approximate route of the "Airline Expressway", what would become the Kensington Expressway. In Cheektowaga, the Airline Expressway was to follow the right-of-way of Maryvale Drive.

Some time in the late 1940s, in the area around where Maryvale Drive crossed the Niagara Lockport & Ontario Power Company transmission line, a developer subdivided the underlying land, and builders put up small starter houses. This happened despite widespread knowledge and press about the planned Thruway and Airline Expressway route, and the location of the interchange between the two. There was strong support for an alternative mainline Thruway route through the East Side of Buffalo, so the routes of Buffalo's future expressway network wasn't 100% certain.

When work began on the Thruway and Exit 52 in the early 1950s. many of the "doll houses" in the right-of-way, still fairly new, were plowed under The houses in the middle of the interchange, fronting on what was then Maryvale Drive, were the survivors. (The site was once part of the huge land holdings of George F. Urban.) Construction wouldn't begin on the Kensington Expressway through Cheektowga until the 1960s, so for about 10 years Thruway Exit 51 was the Maryvale Drive exit.

buffalo-ny-1962.jpg


Elsewhere in Cheektowaga, there were hundreds of existing building lots in the route of the future Thruway. These lots were the result of speculative subdivision during the boom of the 1910s and 1920s. The Depression hit, and Erie County found itself the owner of tens of thousands of lots throughout the region thanks to tax foreclosures. The county gradually sold off the vacant lots, including many in the future Thruway ROW, starting in the late 1930s. (The county lot sales would continue into the 1960s. It's the reason why many of Buffalo's mid-century suburban areas have a grid street pattern -- the lots were created decades earlier.)

cleveland_hill_1925.jpg
 

DVD

Cyburbian
Messages
15,347
Points
52
I drive Black Canyon Freeway all the time. That's an old picture, but to give the NUMS some more problems, the cross roads are a mile apart. That's not a lot of housing density! Still isn't today.
 

Dan

Dear Leader
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
19,087
Points
70
You know those slow TV videos that feature cab viewmvideos of long train rides through Norway? Here's the Canadian equivalent.


The video starts just before the local/express split.
 
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