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Life-Threatening Illness & Reality Check

Bear Up North

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
9,329
Points
31
Those of you who have browsed my posts over the past year have seen ocassional mention of my chemotherapy treatments. I will give you the story and then ask a couple questions of the group. (Most of you are younger than this ole' Bear and your experience with this sort of thing is/was probably with your parents or grandparents.)

I was diagnosed with Hodgkin's Lymphoma back in mid-1996. The same type of cancer that hockey great Mario Lemuix (sic?) was hit with. During that autumn I went through radiation therapy, every day, for four (4) months. Lost a bunch of weight, because I couldn't swallow (usually necessary part of regular eating).

In check-ups and tests and scans over the course of six (6) years I was pronounced (after five years) "cured".

In February of 2003 I started having fevers and severe night sweats. The trusty internet search led me to "menopause". Heh, heh.....not quite for this guy. That same Google search answered "Hodgkin's symptom". Numerous tests followed and, lo and behold......the evil Mr. Hodgkin's had returned. So, I was placed on the normal chemotheraphy regimen for Hodgkin's....ABDV (each letter signifying a different drug that they would pump into me).

I began chemo in July, 2003, and continued until mid-February, 2004. I lost some weight, gained it back when my doc scolded me for that. I lost all my hair....yes, ALL my hair. (I had been a bearded dude since 1969 !!!). My gosh, I looked like a dork.....ahhh, but with my bald beanie the youngen's checked me out.

In March and April I had the normal tests and scans.....PET Scan (very-sophisticated imaging process), CAT Scan, bone marrow biopsy, and a biopsy of a suspected lymph node. ABVD chemo works for Hodgkin's about 99% of the time. Can I win the lotto? No. Can I win a 50/50 drawing at a club? No. Can I fit into that 1% who don't get cured with normal ABVD? Yes.

Next step.....returning in mid-May to the University of Michigan Cancer Center (one of the best in the world). I will be indoctrinated with information on what is called high-dose chemotherapy, with a bone marrow stem cell transplant. Not fun.

They will inject me with a stem-cell growth-enhancing drug, wait awhile, then harvest stem cells and freeze them. Then, they give me 24-hour-a-day chemo for a few days.....high-dose. It kills everything in the bone marrow. After the chemo drugs have been pushed through me, they reinject the stem cells. I will be in the hospital for 2-4 weeks and off work for another 4 months. (I have never spent a day in the hospital, except age 5, couple days for tonsils being ripped out.)

Sidebar Note: In 1996 my wife was diagnosed with MS. Except for a couple flare-ups it has stayed inactive.

So.....everytime my wife and I start talking about "woe is us"...."bad luck".....we remind each other about REALITY CHECKS.

During a couple consultation visits at U of M's Cancer Center we sat in the waiting room waiting to be called. The room was filled with very young children, most without hair (because of chemo treatments), some too weak to get out of a wheelchair, some with chemical tubes hooked to them. Seeing these young cancer victims is emotionally draining. You just want to hug them and transfer what ever is left of your life into their bodies, so they can live longer. This is a real REALITY CHECK. My problems seem so small compared to them.
_____

My two (2) questions:

Have any of you had experiences with life-threatening illnesses?

Have any of you ever experienced REALITY CHECKS that seem to make your problems seem insignificant.

Bear
 

Rumpy Tunanator

Cyburbian
Messages
4,473
Points
25
All I can say is best of luck to you Bear.

As for your questions, the only life threatening experiences I've every come close to is falling out of a tree and getting sucked into the undertow of the ocean.
For your second question, I see things everyday that make me more humble.
 

Seabishop

Cyburbian
Messages
3,838
Points
25
Luckily no illnesses or injuries here. Good luck to you and your wife and hopefully you can beat it for good. We're all pulling for you.
 

PlannerGirl

Cyburbian Plus
Messages
6,377
Points
29
Best of luck Bear, a dear friend, hes only 21 is facing this EXACT problem. His long time girl friend is terrified. They had been bitching about small stuff the week before they found out he was ill-life is a whole new world for them now.

I suffered early cervical cancer-I cant have kids but damn happy to be alive. Had Spinal Menigitis (sp?) at 6 and ran a 104.6 fever for over 12 hours went into a coma and should have died-damn happy to be alive.

Folks are truly right when they say dont sweat the small stuff-save that for the big ones that will scare you down to your core. You and your wife are in my prayers and thoughts.
 

Big Easy King

Cyburbian
Messages
1,361
Points
23
I haven't experienced a life-threatening illness or reality check. I wish you and your wife the best.
 

NHPlanner

A shadow of my former self
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
9,945
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40
I too have been lucky thus far to avoid life changing ilnesses or accidents. All my best to you and your wife Bear!
 

JNA

Cyburbian Plus
Messages
25,816
Points
61
My father passed away from lung cancer; He had full treatment: surgery, chemo, rad.
I learned many lessons as a 14 yr old, very glad I never smoked.
I have type 2 diabetes, self testing 3-4 x @ day.
Got hypertension under control.

How about we keep each other in our prayers and thoughts.
 

Plannerbabs

Cyburbian
Messages
1,037
Points
23
So far, my husband and I have been lucky, although we've both had people close to us who were quite ill. And as for a reality check, one of our best friends is serving in the USMC in Iraq. Knowing what he must be going through (especially now) puts everything in a different light.
Best of luck, Bear. Amass all the support you can, including here on Cyburbia. From what I've been told, it makes a world of difference knowing there are lots of people supporting you. By the way, one of my HS teachers, one of the most popular teachers in school, went through a similar process several years ago. He came through fine and is still teaching and riding his motorcycle.
 

ludes98

Cyburbian
Messages
1,264
Points
22
Close to home...

Wow is this is close to home.
Bear-
Best of luck in your treatment. It worked for my uncle. He was not going to live without stem cell replacement. His was done at University Medical Center in Tucson. That was two years ago and he just celebrated his 60th birthday. We are all grateful he is here because he almost didn't make it.

I was diagnosed with cancer about three years ago at age 26. Surgery and radiation went well and I have been living with my 95% chance (doctors of course) of it never coming back. I get my usual check ups every six months and I still thank God that I went to the doctor when I knew something wasn't right. If I had waited 6 mos or a year I might not be here. This year I got skin cancer. Strange thing is I stay out of the sun. I am predisposed for it and I had always anticipated that I might get it, but 20 years from now!

Sadly my step father in law is suffering from many liver related problems and needs a transplant badly. For anyone who does not know about the transplant list, be thankful you don't. A lot of people die waiting for an organ. It is highly likely that he won't make it another month without a transplant.

Reality sucks, so I try not to check it too often. Again, best wishes and I hope that things go well for you and your wife.
 

The One

Cyburbian
Messages
8,289
Points
30
Bummer....

Bear:

Used to work with a soil scientist in Va. Two seconds after lifting my head from reading a perc. hole depth, a 4 inch rock rocketed straight through the space my brain previously occupied (would have removed it had I not moved!) That was a close call.... Only 19 at the time and did look at things different after that.

Take a look at a web site called MEDSCAPE 8-! www.medscape.com register with the oncology section and you'll have access to the latest study/research and be able to e-mail experts with questions. Don't worry about registration, its free and they don't care if you're a doctor or not....GREAT SITE :f: ....also medications and desriptions of every disease known.....

Good Luck!
 

biscuit

Cyburbian
Messages
3,904
Points
25
Strange timing for this thread. I just got the e-mail a couple of hours ago that my planning directors son passed away this morning from Hodgkin's Lymphoma. It's really a shame because he was only in his early thirties and his Mom (my boss) has been trying to convience him for months to move from his rural Idaho home so he could get better care back here in Pa., but he just wouldn't do it. Quite sad really...

Good luck to you Bear. My thoughts and prayers are with you as you undertake this procedure.
 

B'lieve

Cyburbian
Messages
219
Points
9
In answer to your second question: my grandfather's final months.

May you and your wife pull through, all the best for you both.
 
Messages
7,649
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29
I suspect you know by now that, yes, I have had a life-threatening illness (from which I am still recovering) and, in fact, I live daily with a potentially life-threatening and incurable genetic disorder. The short version: 36 years of living with an undiagnosed genetic disorder takes a while to recover from. Best guess: I probably had developed multiple anti-biotic resistent infections due to years of treatment that wasn't sufficiently agressive -- through no one's fault. There was no way for the doctor's to know.

My "reality check" is this: the doctors were trying to reassure, yadda yadda, and doing a very poor job of it because they clearly thought this was Bad News. My position was "I have lived with respiratory problems and other health problems my entire life. Now we have a Name for it (something better than "crazy"). Now I can get the treatment I need. This is Good News."

I have trouble convincing others of that -- that knowing I have a genetic disorder is Good News. I tell people I have a genetic disorder and they feel sorry for me. One guy kept harping on it and I told him something like this: "Should I feel sorry for you because you were born MALE? Because you do not know what it is like to be female? Is that reason to PITY you? I was BORN this way. My body has never been normal. I don't miss being 'normal' because I never was. Life is so much better since they diagnosed me. My life was MUCH harder when I had no diagnosis. I needed everyone's pity when I had no diagnosis and was being villified for my picky eating and other things I did to stay alive. I don't need it NOW. My life has never been Better."

Speaking of children: my oldest son has the same genetic disorder that I have. He has not been on antibiotics in about 6 years because of my efforts (including homeschooling him -- his mysterious health problems were the real reason we pulled he kids from school 5 1/2 years ago). He was ID'd for this disorder the month he turned 14. His early childhood was much easier than mine because I was protective of him, in defiance of all the people who thought was a neurotic and overprotective mom, "spoiling" the kid. Because I nearly died, got ID'd and they subsequently tested both kids, he will never suffer the way I have with his medical condition. It was worth nearly dying. It was worth whatever I suffered. I don't have a single regret.

In honor of how you are facing this with dignity, with a larger perspective than your own suffering,

Michele
 

Chet

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
10,623
Points
34
Hey, best wishes to ya Bear, I had not idea you'd been through all that and are facing more. Luckily - yet sadly - I have not had to deal with such things personally, the men in my family do not live long enough before falling over from bad tickers.
 

Zoning Goddess

Cyburbian
Messages
13,852
Points
39
Bear, I'll be pulling for you, too. Best wishes to you and your wife.

No life-threatening illnesses here. My reality check: while my son and I had some frightening experiences at the hands of the ex-, the reality check is parents whose children are actually murdered by their ex-. It didn't make our problems seem insignificant, but it does make you realize it could have been much worse.
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
Messages
10,080
Points
34
Bear - I am truly sorry to hear your news. I have had some close personal calls with the big "C" and know how bad it can be. One of my closest friends was diagnosed with cancer when she was fifteen. It went into remission and came back five times. She passed away shortly after her 21st birthday, just a month after finishing college.

My brother was diagnosed with leukemia the same year. He underwent the treatment you are decribing, except with donated bone marrow (it helps to have an identical twin). You already know how the chemo and radiation makes you tired and sick. The bone marrow replacement then suppresses your immune system. There is a period of months before you are back to normal. The good news is the success rate is good. My brother completed treatment twelve years ago and is perfectly healthy now, with no hint of a problem.

We will all be pulling for you.
 

Gedunker

Moderating
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Moderator
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11,493
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41
Bear Up North I wish you all the best in your ongoing efforts to win this battle. I'm pulling for you.

Bear, I know what you mean about the children. This is my story.

Three days before my son's fourth birthday, on a warm late winter day, my son fell from the swingset in the back yard and landed awkwardly. I yelled for my wife and we grabbed him up in my arms and headed for the hospital. I could feel the two separate pieces of bone in his thigh rubbing against each other as I held him on the ride to the hospital. When we got there, the bureaucracy kicked in -- and no matter how I tried to explain that it was serious, we were told to wait in the lobby along with 15 -20 other people. My son was as brave as he could be, but he was clearly in pain. After what seemed an interminable wait, a nurse came out and asked for "Mrs. Smith". Mrs. Smith -- whomever she was -- declined and told the nurse to take my son first. It was the kindest thing anybody has ever done for me and a debt I try to repay every day, in some small way. (Little 'dunker had a spiral compression fracture of his left femur. His treatment and recovery are a story for a different day. He is a happy, healthy 7yr old today.)

Optimistic Gendunker.
 

SkeLeton

Cyburbian
Messages
4,853
Points
26
Cancer appeared early in my life... A grandmother died of breast cancer when I was 5 and a classmate died of brain cancer when I was 14... :( No happy stories involving cancer here, but people have survived so don't get depressed, you can make it! :)

Best wishes to you and your wife. :)
 

Rem

Cyburbian
Messages
1,523
Points
23
No stories to share here but I hope your treatment is successful. Good luck.
 

SGB

Cyburbian
Messages
3,388
Points
26
No stories here either, Bear. Although I'm sure I'll have my share eventually.

My thoughts & prayers are with you and your family for a full recovery.
 

Doitnow

Cyburbian
Messages
496
Points
16
Hi Bear Up North! (Is it really cold up there!!?)

After reading your post I remember how I went through bad patches myself.
Nowhere near as threatening as Cancer.
My present viewpoint about these things are a result of the mixture of a few incidents that happened to me and more to people around me.

1.Asthma has been in mothers family for generations. So I have seen my grandma, uncle and my mother and brother go through some of toughest attacks over the years. But through discipline and overall measures taken by them they are stable now with my brother hardly having any major problems.
One thing which is common to all of them of them is GRIT .
So you need to have GRIT. It will pull you through.

2. One of the worst was an attack of Acute Gastroenteritis which left me totally dehydrated and with fatally low Blood pressure. The emergency was well handled and I recovered only after rigorous medical care and support from family.
Then despite the constant support of my mom, dad, uncles, aunts and everybody else I lost all physical energy, I hadn't eaten for two weeks or so( solid food I meant) and suddenly .I lost hope. It was after that my situation started deteriorating. I hadn't realised that the body takes time to recoup and I was already showing signs of improvement.Once I gave up mentally I started sliding. Can you believe it, Each and every member of my family( both from my fathers and mothers side put in their energies to save me( this planner :p ).
They showed me signs of positiveness when my mind was blurrred and fuzzy and when I thought that 'this was my end'. They raised the energy within me to say yes all one needs to do is to shake oneself up from the despondency. I remember the day I lost hope. That would be a horrible day for anybody. How could a person who energised others, who pepped up others could go down like this( blah blah...)
Well the gist is :Never Lose Hope.
Bad times come for everyone.( in your case it seems to be aprolonged case of bad times, but hey there are many positive cases to take heart from) Even the strongest have weak moments. Never shy away from taking support from your near and dear( Support System).

3. Look at people who are in a condition worse than you. All you need tois to make a visit to the hospital. You have already done that I think.

4. Try to meet doctors/specialists known to speak nicely to patients. A simple soft word from a doctor can do wonders and raise the spirit like anything.
Frankly I havent had very bad experiences. I try my best to assist neghbours, friends and relatives in emergencies. This keeps me going to the hospitals to see the plight of the people who really suffer. I try to calm myself whenevr I am restless( tough job really)
Till now life has been good to me :)
Now I am back to giving those high spirited talks. :p
I can only share my experiences and views in this forum and like others wish you all the best in whatever you do.
I only hope that what I have said is of some use to you.

Keep smiling and Hey! try reading things you never thought you would read. try those hobbies which you always wanted but never found the time to do :)
 
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Habanero

Cyburbian
Messages
3,241
Points
27
Best wishes, Bear, for both you and your wife. My brother has MS, although after finding out he's had many many episodes.. but we all remain positive and it seems to help. Always remember, bald men are sexy!!
 

SlaveToTheGrind

Cyburbian
Messages
1,447
Points
27
Best wishes to you Bear. We are all pulling for you.


A few things have happened to me over the last several years that have given me a reality check.

The first one was my two boys coming into this world. I never felt much compassion for stories in the news about children who were sick, abused, etc. I felt bad, but the feeling left soon after it came. The momemt I held my oldest after he was born, the world changed for me forever. It breaks my heart to see or hear of children go through something terrible. Case in point - the girl who survived over a week on ramen and gatorade after her mom went over a cliff in their car in California. The mother dies but the girl survived. I see my boys and want to do everything I can to protect them.

The second was when my dad was diagnosed with prostate cancer. Luckily it was found early enough and so far, everything checks out.

Finally, my brother is now in Kuwait, waiting to go into Iraq. I called him the day before he left. We did not say much, five minutes, maybe. But I remember what I said last to him. "Do you job and get home." The whole rest of the day all I could think of was if that was the last time I'd every speak to him.
 

Jen

Cyburbian
Messages
1,704
Points
26
You all are keeping it real, Thanks for sharing these very sobering experiences, and to read of the serious diagnoses that young/ not so old people are hearing, so many...I seriously believe the reports that widespread use chemicals(pesticides, etc etc)is a leading environmental factor that affects the human endocrinal system.
 
Messages
3,690
Points
27
Bear - best of luck to you. I had no idea.

We've been so fortunate that our loved ones have been (knock on wood) so healthy. The closest we've been to dealing with health adversity is - before conceiving, I'd been diagnosed with "unexplained infertility" - which really isn't much of a diagnosis. After 2 years of failed round after round of infertilty drugs and proceedures, I had a breakdown in my doctor's office after yet another negative pregnancy test, and she said to me "Honey - even with us not knowing what is wrong with you - you still have better odds of getting pregnant than 3/4 of the women that walk into this office." That really was a reality check - that I had so much to be grateful and hopeful for compared to these women who were trying with so many more problems.
 

Doitnow

Cyburbian
Messages
496
Points
16
Off topic:
But to lighten it a bit. I hope you don't mind Bear Up north!

bald men are sexy!!
Or to look at it from another angle does it mean.

'Bald Men have had a lot of Sex!!"
 

Bear Up North

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
9,329
Points
31
Thanx for all the nice words and the prayers.

Monday, 5-17-04, is the day that Katie and I truck up to the University of Michigan's Cancer Center to meet with the bone marrow transplant specialists.

I will know much more after that......when, how, how long, risks, blah-blah.

Bear
 

Duke Of Dystopia

Cyburbian
Messages
2,713
Points
24
Bear Up North said:
Thanx for all the nice words and the prayers.

Monday, 5-17-04, is the day that Katie and I truck up to the University of Michigan's Cancer Center to meet with the bone marrow transplant specialists.

I will know much more after that......when, how, how long, risks, blah-blah.

Bear
Have faith there is something more than only yourself. Without that there is no reason.

I don't have the answere, but I can tell you that every day you wake up and draw breath, is another day to have a chance to do something else.

Good luck!
 

chrisinmd

Cyburbian
Messages
322
Points
11
Heart Attack Survivor

[My two (2) questions:

Have any of you had experiences with life-threatening illnesses?

Have any of you ever experienced REALITY CHECKS that seem to make your problems seem insignificant.


Hi,
I had a heart attack two and half years ago. I was out for 3 months recovering, I have two stents in my heart now. The heart attack damaged one section of my heart ( I run on 3 valves now instead of four). I excerse regularly, try to eat right, don't smoke but still am a planner in a highly stressful,politically charged atmosphere.
Reality Checks-- What used to be important just isn't any more, it changes you in ways that are difficult to explain. I had the windows open this morning and before I got up I was listening to the birds. I never did that in the past, i was too involved in getting ahead and getting money and working for the "Man" and trying to become one of them. I listen to the birds now and appreciate that in new way, or I walk in the woods and hear the sounds of the woods, or look at my loved ones and apprciate their love. Its calmed me down a lot, made me more aware of my surroundings, made me more tolerant of others, I don;t want be the like the "Man" anymore. I go home a 5:00 now, its will all be here tomorrow and Western Civilization won;t end if it's not exactly on time like before.
 
Messages
5,352
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31
Good luck to you guys. I hope all goes well. :)

I guess I had a little bit of both last summer. Last year I was diagnosed with a condition that needed to be treated by what my doctor thought was a simple laporoscopic surgery where I would be in and out of the hospital the same day. During pre-surgery blood tests, I tested positive for cancer. Despite that, I went into the hospital thinking and hoping that I would go home later that day. Well, I woke up about 7 hrs later to have the nurse tell me that I didn't have cancer as suspected, but my condition was much worse than what my doctor had originally thought so I had to be cut open and have some stuff taken out. 4 days later I went home.

A week later, I went to my doctor to have my staples removed. Unfortunately, the incision didn't heal as quickly expected and it split open while the staples were being removed. Since it couldn't be stitched closed, I had to let it heal and close on its own. That meant 5+ weeks of painful daily treatment and bandaging by home health care nurses.

It eventually healed and I went back to work and slowly resumed my regular routine. That scar serves as my reality check of how important it is to take care of my health as well as a testament to my personal strength.
 

Bear Up North

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
9,329
Points
31
Update.....

Last week I spent three (3) days in the hospital, getting a different blend of chemotherapy drugs (.....rasberry flavor, anyone?.....) for 24-7. The drugs made me tired but not sick. I did return to work on Friday, much to my wife's dismay.

In three (3) weeks I get the same treatment again.

These two blasts are to "prepare" my bone marrow. They will then do a bone marrow biopsy (I have had four....they hurt...whine whine whine). That biopsy will tell them if my bone marrow is positive or negative for Hodgkins. I pray, of course, for negative.....which would mean that I will be my own donor for the bone marrow transplant.

If positive, the two (2) 3-day treatments were a waste, and I get to find some other donor. My two (2) brothers are first in line, ready and willing to test. There is a 25% chance of one (1) of them being a match.

If they are not a match.....the donor would then be somebody who donated to a bone marrow donation program. (I'm hoping for Uma Thurman or Cameron Diaz.)
The risks increase substantially when the donor is not me. I don't like risks, but it is my lot in what has been a long and fun life.

I'm confident (staying positive is most of the battle) that everything will turn-out OK and I'll be back on the basketball court, back in the office, back at the drawing table (continual development of De Noc, you know), back in the saddle (heh heh) again.

Oddly enough, my wife, Katie, became very sick just as I was released from this latest chemo batch. I gave her a lot of static, telling her she couldn't handle it. (It has been quite the stressful time.....she has a 16-year old teenager, you know.)

Can't wait to get past this and open a bottle of Rolling Rock, cheer on the Pittsburgh Steelers and the Detroit Red Wings, and converse somewhat civil-like with my friends at beautiful downtown Cyburbia.

Bear
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
Messages
10,080
Points
34
Bear Up North said:
I pray, of course, for negative.....
And many Cyburbians will be joining you. If there is a supreme being, he needs to get on the good side of planners after that gaff of creating Earth without the proper permits.
 
Messages
7,649
Points
29
Advice from my sister:
When in chemotherapy, take your vitamins (and fairly high doses of them) -- expecially your B vitamins! She has no numbness in her extremities, a common permanent outcome.

I don't "pray". But I will hold you in the light.
 
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JNA

Cyburbian Plus
Messages
25,816
Points
61
Bear Up North said:
I pray, of course, for negative.....

I'm confident (staying positive is most of the battle) that everything will turn-out OK

Can't wait to get past this
I like your attitude - Keep it high.
 

Bear Up North

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
9,329
Points
31
Bear Health Update

Went thru three (3) days of 24-hour chemothrapy, late June. Did not affect me as much as the 9-months of chemo that I had mid-2003 thru early-2004. I did lose all my hair, except my hair in the ears. My wife is having a ball with that fact!

Actually, she was sicker than I was.....stress, probably.....as I mentioned in a previous post.

This coming Monday I go back in for another three (3) days. I get to watch the Democratic Convention, from gavel slam to gavel slam. Mmmmmmm......

Maybe the Detroit Tigers will be on the tube.....or, I will re-read THE STAND, by Steve King.

Mid-August they run tests and then determine when I slide up to Ann Arbor for the bone marrow transplant.

Bear
 

yaff

Cyburbian
Messages
108
Points
6
Bear Up North said:
Bear Health Update

Went thru three (3) days of 24-hour chemothrapy, late June. Did not affect me as much as the 9-months of chemo that I had mid-2003 thru early-2004. I did lose all my hair, except my hair in the ears. My wife is having a ball with that fact!

Actually, she was sicker than I was.....stress, probably.....as I mentioned in a previous post.

This coming Monday I go back in for another three (3) days. I get to watch the Democratic Convention, from gavel slam to gavel slam. Mmmmmmm......

Maybe the Detroit Tigers will be on the tube.....or, I will re-read THE STAND, by Steve King.

Mid-August they run tests and then determine when I slide up to Ann Arbor for the bone marrow transplant.

Bear
Bear,

My thoughts and prayers are with you. You are a real soldier!! Keep your eye on the mission (or remission as the case may be ;-) )
 

Bear Up North

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
9,329
Points
31
Bear health update.....

Four (4) months of radiation therapy.....DONE.
Nine (9) months of chemotherapy, administered every three (3) weeks.....DONE.
Two (2) fun episodes of 24-hour 3-day chemotherapy.....DONE.
Another Cat-Scan.....DONE.

Scheduled.....

Another bone marrow biopsy.

To Be Scheduled.....

Consultation with oncology docs at University of Michigan Cancer Center.
Bone marrow (stem cell) transplant.
2-6 months of recovery.
Return to work.
Return to basketball court.
Return to taverns (with friends).
Living long enough to more than beat actuary tables.
Getting to work on that long to-list for Amish Sim City.....De Noc.

Ticking Clock Bear
 

Budgie

Cyburbian
Messages
5,270
Points
30
PlannerGirl said:
Had Spinal Menigitis (sp?) at 6 and ran a 104.6 fever for over 12 hours went into a coma and should have died-damn happy to be alive.
I had Viral Meningitis as a teen, ran 104+ temperature for 3 days and was hospitalized for 10 days. Went in and out of sleep (consciousness). Half the time I didn't know if I was awake or dreaming. It all ran together.

Bear, I would not even pretend to understand your view of life. I have respect for people who understand what is truly important in life. Inner stength and understand comes from dealing with adversity. Your statement about transferring what is left of your life to victims younger than you is profound and will be with me for a very long time. Thank you.
 

Bear Up North

Cyburbian Emeritus
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9,329
Points
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Everybody in beautiful downtown Cyburbia, wish me luck.....

Thursday, 9-9-04, should be getting results from last Friday's bone marrow biopsy. Hopefully, this Bear will be his own donor for transplant.

I'm not superstitious, but a black cat crossed my path. Heh heh heh......

Bear by the Phone :p
 

Richmond Jake

You can't fight in here. This is the War Room!
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18,313
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All the very best, BUN. The remaining luck that I carry in my pocket is hereby conveyed to you. :b:

Jake, pulling on a bottle of Yuengling...
 
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Bear Up North

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
9,329
Points
31
Perhaps I was taking the wrong medicine. A few weeks ago, even though I wasn't supposed to because of my chemotherapy, I had a couple draft beers. It certainly wasn't ROLLING ROCK, this Bear's brand of choice.

But it was beer. :b:

And.....today I just received the message from my oncology docs that I can be my own bone marrow stem cell donor for my BMSTC transplant. This is great news because of the serious risks involved if one (1) is NOT their own donor.

Bear and Mrs. Bear plan to celebrate Thursday night at a local establishment, Loma Linda's. Bear will probably not have any beer.

It still is a long road ahead....but a little less bumpy.

Bear In The Air :)
 
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