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Life-Threatening Illness & Reality Check

Bear Up North

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Update

Sad update about my older brother.....

As mentioned in this thread, a while back, my brother (five years my senior) slid into the grasp of severe dementia. The dementia started to show its' ugly face about three years ago. Over the course of those three years family members watched as dementia attacked a published author, former college professor, incredibly bright man approaching retirement.

For the last half year or so he has been a heavy burden on my sis-in-law. He is afraid of water so when my S-I-L and her grandson would try to get my brother in the shower he would fight.....throwing punches and screaming. The brother that was in that body has died.....but his dementia-ravaged body lives on.

Finally my S-I-L was approved to move my brother to a nursing home. That event took place this past week. He thinks he is at a hotel.....although, his first day at the home involved a physical battle with beefy security personnel (and a short visit to the emergency room).

The body that held my brother is now heavily sedated. Cancer has entered his body. It probably will not be long.

I was close to my brother. We shared similar viewpoints (he was a bit more liberal, I am a bit more libertarian). We are both award-winning poets. We would spend many hours discussing politics, fishing, music, and movies. Horrible puns would roll off our tongues at every family get-together.

Yes, my brother died a while ago.....date uncertain. How do you pin a date on three years of slowly sliding into the hell of dementia?

Bear
 

illinoisplanner

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Sorry to hear about that Bear. It's very tough to watch a loved one go through that. I've seen it happen with my grandparents. And it's not fun. Luckily, we've been able to significantly slow the progression of my grandma's Alzheimer's. We weren't so lucky with my grandpa who died 8 years ago. You just have to sort of remember them for who they were and the good times you had, and just try to cherish every "good" moment you can still get out of them.

On another note, my aunt just passed away this weekend. It was a combo of cancer and that new superbug they're all talking about. She was only in her early 60s. We're burying her tomorrow.
 

kms

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I'm sorry, Bear. I'm sure that your sister-in-law really struggled with this decision.
 

kjel

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BUN: Hang in there buddy.

illinoisplanner: Sorry to hear about your aunt. May she rest in peace.
 

cch

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Illinoisplanner, I'm so sorry to hear of your aunt's passing.

My grandpa died 5 years ago, after about 7 years of dementia. He spent one day in a nursing home, but my grandma insisted it made him upset, so he was brought back home. For over 4 years he laid in a hospital bed in their den. My grandma would turn the tv on for him (always if there was a Cub game on), and talk to him. When I got married my grandma insisted I come over and wear my wedding dress for him to see, but I know he had no idea who I was. He died long before he actually died, and we were all basically relieved, except for my grandma. She was devestated. My grandma exterted herself so much trying to care for him, even though a nurse came to the home a few times a week. But we were all happy to see my grandma finally get a chance to take care of herself.

I'm sorry about your brother, BUN.
 

tsc

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so sorry to hear...thanks for sharing to make us remember to enjoy life while we can.
 

Bear Up North

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My Sad Saturday

Last Saturday, 12-8-07, I had to skip my involvement in my company's Annual Physical Inventory. Here's why.....

Early Saturday morning my younger brother picked me up. We drove over to the eastern Toledo suburb, Oregon, OH, and picked-up my niece. We drove to Geauga County, OH, east of Cleveland.

My older brother, going through the ravages of dementia, is staying (for a short while) at a special behavioral unit at the hospital near Chardon, OH.

When we arrived, my sister-in-law brought my brother out to see us. Even though he is only 64, he looked like a frail old man. He sat down and we attempted to talk.

He did not know who I was, he did not know who our brother was......but he smiled (ever-so-slightly) when we asked if he knew his daughter. She hugged him and attempted to hold back tears, to no avail.

We spent some time talking with him, bringing up stories from our past, showing him pictures, kidding him about things he did. Very little response. He spent most of his time tugging at the sleeves on his hospital gown or tying and untying his shoes.

It was tough on all of us, but especially tough on his daughter, because she (admitedly so) had been in denial about his condition. My sister-in-law was very happy that we made the trip and spent the time. She knows that her husband has died and the man sitting in the chair is somebody else.

On the way back to NW Ohio we talked about his condition, our reactions and feelings, and we had a long discussion about dementia, the brain, the things we remember and the things we want to forget.

I will never forget last Saturday.

Bear
 

KSharpe

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I'm so sorry that you or anyone has to go through this. I hope when its through you will see how your family rose to the occassion and will give you some strength and comfort.
 

wahday

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Wow, I'm very sad to hear all that, Bear. As I think I mentioned in this or a related forum, my father has Alzheimer's and is now living in a "memory care" facility in Seattle near my older brother, so I have some sense of what you are experiencing. He's not quite as young as your brother - he'll be 77 in February - but this all started, we now realize, about a decade ago. The progression has not been steady, but rather in fits and starts where he will decline in some abilities suddenly and then plateau for a while before taking another dive. He's in a rather blissed-out state right now - he couldn't plan his way out of the next 15 minutes, but he can quip and make terrible puns (the only ones he ever made) on a good day. But I also know it won't last forever. As you so aptly described, the man I knew is all but gone (though he surfaces as the most unexpected times, albeit only for a moment or two). Its a strange sensation to realize that your opportunity to connect and say goodbye has passed, even though the person may be around for possibly years to come.

I think he is not quite as far along as your brother, but a lot of the behaviors you describe are very familiar. My grandmother and great uncle also had dementia and its very weird to see them all take almost the exact same course in their deterioration. The fidgety behaviors, that look in their eye (which seems to be a combination of confusion and fear), the palpable sense of anxiety that they cannot express. This is heavy stuff and it pains me to hear about others going through it.

I recently drove with my family from Albuquerque to Irvine, CA to collect a bunch of his personal effects from his now ex-wife (she couldn't deal with his decline and bailed out of the situation). As I stood on the beach in San Clemente, I remembered that it was almost exactly a year ago that my brother's family and mine rented a house out there to spend time with my father. At the time, the ice was breaking inside his mind and everything was about to come crashing down. Since then he has had intestinal surgery, experienced a psychotic break, spent two weeks in the state mental hospital, had the police called on him for frieghtening behavior, was tricked into going to Seattle for placement in a facility, went into the hospital after a bad fall and violent outburst at that facility, and ultimately landed in his current place of residence where, amazingly enough, he has been placid and cooperative since day one. Its been quite a wild ride and I just had to sit there and call my brother while I dipped my toes in the ocean to express the gravity of the moment. What a frickin' year!

My father is the last of the parents for both my wife and I and we're not quite forty yet. I can't imagine losing my brother at this juncture (he's the only sibling I've got). My thoughts go out to you...
 

Bear Up North

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Approaching My 3-Year Anniversary

This Bear is quickly approaching the 3-year anniversary of my bone marrow stem cell transplant. It took place at the University of Michigan's world-class Cancer Center, the first week of January, 2005. The actual transplant occured in two separate "infusions", a day apart. A lengthy hospital stay followed. I was released in late January.

I remained off work until mid-April of that year, just kind of laying around, watching old movies, posting on Cyburbia, and working on my fake city (a healthy form of therapy for me). In mid-April I returned to the workplace and stayed about 4-6 hours a day for a month or so, finally getting back to full-time by early sum-sum-summertime.

Three years later I still do not have the high energy level I had prior-to the tranny. But, I have strong eastern European stock in this old bod.....I am fully convinced that my Russian/Lithuanian/Polish genes have helped me survive and give me the strength I do have.

With a little help from good ole' technology :-D.

I have been fighting this Hodgkin's Lymphoma menace since it invaded my body back in the spring of 1996. My body has endured months of radiation (hey, I have tatoos because of that treatment), 12-weeks of chemo, two different hospital stays of high-dose chemo, and the BMSCT.

I praise medical technology, my health care providers, my specific ethnic background......but most praise needs to go to all that have given me words of encouragement, put up with a seemingly-endless parade of horrible puns, and helped me through the ups and downs that cancer survivors plod through. Those kind words came from family, friends, and my friends at this place we call Cyburbia.

Slightly changing Frodo's line....."Onward to 4-Years!"

Bear
 

JNA

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two weeks ago blood work done -

HbA1c - 6.7 - Long term blood glucose level
considered by American Diabetic Association (ADA) under control (<7.0)
but not good by the American College of Endocrinology (ACE) (<6.5)

Cholesterol - 120 - Near Optimal/ Above Optimal
HDL - 35 - Low

Not change in weight, blood pressure.

Being a 50 y.o. male - need to make the appointment for the scope.
I have an appointment for a skin cancer screening - family history of it.
 
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Some time in January will be the 7 year anniversary of when 10 weeks of chronic ear infections turned to pneumonia, left me bedridden for nearly 4 months and ultimately led to a diagnosis that May of "atypical cystic fibrosis". Some milestones for me:

July 2006 chest xray revealed that I no longer had a hole in my left lung.

Around the same time, I got off the prescription digestive enzymes I was supposed to require "for life".

Got my first full-time paid job that fall -- something I could never do before that because I was never well enough.

Made it through training without taking any time off.

Made it through the first year of employment without using up all my sick leave. In fact, I cashed in leave.

Only twice had to confess to superiors that minor issues I had at work were because I am seriously medically handicapped. This led to those minor things largely disappearing as "issues". Other than that, I think I am just "weird" to other people there -- which is the norm for me. :)

Got off ibuprofen a few weeks ago, a drug I took nearly daily for something like 5 or 6 years.

Have started getting feedback again that people think I am at least 5 years younger than I am. This was cool when I was 30. Now, having lived through so much medical hell, it is plain weird. :p

There's probably others but I think that will do. :)
 

kjel

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two weeks ago blood work done -

HbA1c - 6.7 - Long term blood glucose level
considered by American Diabetic Association (ADA) under control (<7.0)
but not good by the American College of Endocrinology (ACE) (<6.5)

Cholesterol - 120 - Near Optimal/ Above Optimal
HDL - 35 - Low

Not change in weight, blood pressure.

Being a 50 y.o. male - need to make the appointment for the scope.
I have an appointment for a skin cancer screening - family history of it.

JNA you are almost there! I know it's a major PITA to think about what you put in your mouth and when all the time but it pays off big time in the end in a number of ways. Have fun with the scope :-c The skin cancer screening is vital especially if there is a family history and you have a number of moles. Have them (or yourself) photograph and measure the moles once a year for comparison purposes. I get to go in for my semi annual donation of blood to the lab so we will see how good I've been these last few months when the A1c comes back. Take care of yourself!
 

giff57

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Don't fear the scope

Everybody says its so bad. Had one a couple of weeks ago, was not that bad.
 

Veloise

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Hints from Veloise: (my usual specialty is getting chain grease out of the right ankle pants inseam)

For the liquid diet, consume broth made from a rotisserie chicken. Boullion cubes just don't do the job.

Ensure ain't bad. Chill it, serve over ice.

I had conflicting instructions about water that day. I drank.

Get your designated driver to take you out for a nice lunch afterwards.

The best part: getting told "we found nothing, see you in three years."

HTH
 

JNA

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Just got home from having the C-Scope proceedure.

Don't Fear the Scope
Everybody says its so bad. Had one a couple of weeks ago, was not that bad.
It was not bad at all, the worst part was the cleaning prep - not pretty.
The drugs are good.
Out like a light - remember going into the op room, they injected something into the IV, and next thing I was waking up.
The best part: getting told "we found nothing,.."
I got the same report. :)

The only after affects I am experiencing is GAS.

Worst joke/sarcasm I heard about it is A Right of Passage
 

Bear Up North

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Test City, USA

This Bear has been going through some tests, related to the 3-year anniversary of my bone marrow transplant. Some bads news hit the fan.....

The chemo and radiation (over the years) has managed to destroy about one-third of my lungs. Good news is that, since I never was a smoker, the effects are primarily shortness of breath and acquiring goodies like bronchitis rather easily. The damage can't be fixed, though.

I am now taking steroids, for awhile, Has anybody seen Roger Clemens, in case I run low? ;)

Next up.....another PET Scan. This Bear is overdue for that little event.

Shortness of breath shouldn't affect my jumper, though.....so a certain Panhandle RJ will still get his Timex wracked on the roundball court. I should schedule our "game" for a Friday afternoon. Oh, wait....he's busy.

;-)

Bear
 

kms

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I know someone else who suffered some kind of damage related to treatment. I'm sorry for the bad part of your news.

If you are using inhaled steroids, remember to brush your teeth or rinse your mouth after using the inhaler, or your gums will become inflamed.
 

TOFB

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Just got home from having the C-Scope proceedure.


It was not bad at all, the worst part was the cleaning prep - not pretty.

Out like a light - remember going into the op room, they injected something into the IV, and next thing I was waking up.

I got the same report. :)

The only after affects I am experiencing is GAS.

Worst joke/sarcasm I heard about it is A Right of Passage

I had the 'southbounder' three times last year with an esophogeal "C" scare last year (all fine). Having a 'northbounder' in a few months doesn't concern me at all
 

JNA

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I had the 'southbounder' three times last year with an esophogeal "C" scare last year (all fine).
Several years ago I too had experienced an E-scope and a barium contrast (YUK !) for esophagus trouble which was later diagnosed as GERD.
 

TOFB

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-scope and a barium contrast (YUK !) for esophagus trouble which was later diagnosed as GERD

Yummmmm, tasty, I can taste that chalk shake now . . .
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Bear Up North

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Bob

My brother-in-law passed away early Tuesday morning. Katie received the call about Noon on Monday, from Hospice of Northwest Ohio. They said, "It's going to happen soon. Gather the family."

This call had been received twice before.....so there was a bit of reluctance. Bob's condition, though, was very grave. Not responsive at all, labored breathing. If you are a smoker.....stop now, throw away those cigs. Bob was a heavy smoker.

He was a fun guy. Mid 60s, athletic background, loved the University of Michigan and the Miami Dolphins. His family was scattered.....California, Oregon, Idaho, Dayton, Toledo.

Katie took it much harder than I expected. Even though she was prepared, it has been a tough week. The funeral is tomorrow (Friday). That period when the immediate family is alone with the deceased is always the hardest part.

Bob suffered a lot in the last few years. His lung capacity continued to diminish. During our visits to Hospice he would talk about old times, sports....and kept insisting that he was "ready for death". Bob died with a smile (almost a grin) on his face.

I sure hope I die with a smile on my face.

Bear
 

Gedunker

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Condolences to Katie and you, BUN. Having gotten that call with my mom last June, I can tell you firsthand that no amount of preparation is enough when losing a loved one. It hurts and it hurts hard.

My prayers to all.
 

ofos

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Best wishes and prayers for you two and the family. Mrs. ofos and I have both lost parents but not a sibling. Not looking forward to that experience either.
 

tsc

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Bear, so sorry for your loss and hope you hear better news on your health.
 

Bear Up North

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Update

Here's an update on this Bear's health and an issue that is somewhat related.....

Bear
The University of Michigan, the location for my bone marrow transplant back in January, 2005, is asking that I go through some tests, such as a PET Scan, Cat Scan, and some others. I have started going through that list. Couple weeks ago I did the cardio test....everything is A-OK in that area of the Bear Bod. :-D

I also have another round of childhood immunizations to go through. This final round of "pokes" will get me up-to-date. (In case you didn't know, when you go through a bone marrow transplant the high-dose chemo that they put in you wipes out all of those childhood immunizations.)

One of the usual (and normal) side effects of a BMT is a loss of energy. I will certainly attest to that. Just don't have the same level of energy. (Yeah, I am old and that has a lot to do with it. :-c)

This update is inspired by the recent death of Randy Pausch. I have a lot to be thankful for.....my body (and heavy radiation, high dose chemo, the BMT) has been fighting this stoopid (sinc) cancer since 1996. And I probably don't grab some of the things in life that I should.

Workplace
One of my key supervisors at the workplace went through knee surgery last week. My plans were to cover for her during the 4 to 6 weeks she was going to be off. Unfortunately, there were serious complications after her surgery.....a serious blood clot. She is now in the hospital and the return to work when expected could change.

This is where my health and what I need to do at my workplace collide. Sooooo.....I am forcing myself to get more rest than usual and I am trying to get more consistent with vitamin consumption.

Bear
 

Bear Up North

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My Brother

Tonight I was commenting in another thread, explaining my views of the Cleveland Metropolitan Area. Those comments included a mention of my older brother, who has been in that area since the mid-1970s.

Update
My older brother's condition continues to worsen. He is in the mid-stages of severe Alzheimer's. He is only 65, but has been unable to effectively communicate for the last couple of years. When we visit with him he just sits in a wheelchair and stares, occasionally making an off-the-wall comment. When we ask him if he remembers somebody he will usually just look at his feet. Once in a while he will smile and say a person's name or say, "yes."

His daughter (who lives in an inner-ring Toledo suburb) says that he is now showing signs of trembling. He has also been diagnosed with a form of Parkinson's. I am not sure if there is a relationship between Alzheimer's and Parkinson's.

He has been in a long-term-care facility for over a year, removing some of the incredible burden on caregiving that his wife has gone through.

As I have said in other posts.....when I see him I am at a loss for words. My loss for words is controlled by me, though. His loss for words is from the horrible ravages of a disease, with no control by him. I find words, via posts like this in Cyburbia. With my posts (updates on his condition) I feel that I am, at the very least, sharing (perhaps lightening) my burden. But, my burden is regret....regret and sadness because the older brother has left my life.....not in body, but in soul.

Bear
 

Cardinal

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...regret and sadness because the older brother has left my life.....not in body, but in soul.

Bear

That is the hard part to grasp with Alzheimer's. The body is still there but the person is gone. I saw it happen to my grandfather. As he worsened it seemed like so much of the life ebbed from him, until he could no longer communicate or even understand what was going on around him. After that it was like going to a wake to see him. He was a strong man and lasted for years after the Alzheimer's set in. I wonder if it would not have been more merciful to have him be able to end it all earlier, while he still was who he was.
 

kjel

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That is the hard part to grasp with Alzheimer's. The body is still there but the person is gone. I saw it happen to my grandfather. As he worsened it seemed like so much of the life ebbed from him, until he could no longer communicate or even understand what was going on around him. After that it was like going to a wake to see him. He was a strong man and lasted for years after the Alzheimer's set in. I wonder if it would not have been more merciful to have him be able to end it all earlier, while he still was who he was.

My mom was never diagnosed but my ex (an MD) and I thought she had beginning stage Alzheimer's given the memory lapses, mood swings, confusion, and combativeness among other things. Although she was only 62 when she died from complication of surgery for an aortic aneurysm I am glad that she was spared from the ever downward spiral of the disease.
 

Bear Up North

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Katie's Sister

Katie is really depressed today. Here's the scenario.....

She was already stressed and down, because she was scheduled for a regular check-up related to her fight with MS. Those doc visits are always scary to her because she remains convinced that it is only a matter of time until the doc proclaims that her MS is advancing to a more severe stage.

But as she was preparing to leave she received a call from her older sister. Her sister had just been told that she has a massive growth in her pelvis and has to go through a bout of testing and scanning. This doesn't look good. So Katie cancelled her doc trip and drove over to her sister's house, in Maumee, OH (inner-ring suburb of Toledo).

When she arrived home a while ago I asked her how her sis was doing. Katie responded that her sis was doing very well, not stressed at all....and Katie was a basket case.
_____

2008 has not been kind to us. Katie lost her brother to cancer in February. My brother was placed in a rest home early in the year. Now this.

Katie is the "baby" of the family, at 45 years old. Her living brothers are 60 and 70. Her sister is 65, with a developmentally-disabled daughter (35) living with her.

Bear
 

JNA

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I wonder if my Dr will change my prescription for Avandia ?

HEADLINE: Diabetes Drug Linked to Higher Risk of Death
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/25/health/25diabetes.html?ref=health

HIGHLIGHT:
Both the American Diabetes Association and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes have removed rosiglitazone from lists of recommended treatments for type 2 diabetes.

The consumer watchdog group Public Citizen went further last month, calling on the Food and Drug Administration to ban the drug and claiming that it causes liver failure, vision impairment and other serious side effects, in addition to heart problems.
 

kjel

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I wonder if my Dr will change my prescription for Avandia ?

HEADLINE: Diabetes Drug Linked to Higher Risk of Death
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/25/health/25diabetes.html?ref=health

HIGHLIGHT:

These reports have been coming out for about a year and a half now. Fortunately I am well controlled on Metformin XR and minding my diet. I think one thing is important to consider and that is people who are diabetic suffer disproportionately from heart diseases-high cholesterol, high blood pressure, stroke, atherosclerosis, etc. A diabetic is more likely to die from heart disease than of diabetes! Here's a LINK to one of the best articles I've seen for the lay person dealing with diabetes and its management.
 

Tresmo

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As I have said in other posts.....when I see him I am at a loss for words. My loss for words is controlled by me, though. His loss for words is from the horrible ravages of a disease, with no control by him. I find words, via posts like this in Cyburbia. With my posts (updates on his condition) I feel that I am, at the very least, sharing (perhaps lightening) my burden. But, my burden is regret....regret and sadness because the older brother has left my life.....not in body, but in soul.

Bear

My grandfather is going through this right now. My parents are down for Thanksgiving and took my grandparents and dropped them at my aunt's house for a week on their way to visit us. Sadly, my grandfather couldn't handle it and my aunt and uncle escorted them home on a plane two days after they arrived. It's a terrible illness and so hard for others to understand. Right now there is a problem because the out of town relatives (my aunt and her family) have no clue what is going on with him and are in total denial. They don't get that his behavior isn't driven by logic anymore (he was a microbiologist by trade) and that he just isn't "there." :(

A good Alzheimer's book is "The Story of My Father" by Sue Miller. It was relatable and well-written, and helped me understand my own feelings, if that makes sense.
 

Bear Up North

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BMT Anniversary

In early January this Bear will be celebrating the 4th anniversary of my admittance to the University of Michigan Hospital for a bone marrow stem-cell transplant. As they say, "Life goes on."

And thanks to the BMT, mine does. :)

Here are some random thoughts and comments relating to my tranny.....

If you ever visit a BMT patient you will notice that the room smells like tomatoes. Katie kids me about that.
Last week Katie had a patient at her office who was going for his BMT (in January).
High dose chemotherapy sux.
My nearly-one-month hospital stay kept me off of Cyburbia. Oh the humanity! :-c
In January I will begin another round of tests, scans, etc.
BMT patients have to start all over with immunizations.
Civilization II can be played, on a laptop, while doing "time" at the hospital.
After about day 20, a BMT patient will start to see his/her numbers start to get better.
_____

Every time I think about my check-up visits to the University of Michigan Hospital's Cancer Center I visualize all of the little children that go through that facility. If you sit in the waiting room......any day......the number of children with life-threatening disease is astounding.....and incredibly sad.

Bear
 

zman

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Glad the Bear is still with us! Thanks for the update. :-D

Actually, I thought about this thread a couple weeks ago. My wife went in for her yearly check up and a breast abnormality was found by the doc. So we were referred to a diagnostics center in the Town Next Door to get a better read on what was going on. We were both pretty nervous in the time between the check up and the next appointment, quietly thinking the worst, but openly optimistic.
The diagniostics went fine and it was found to be excess tissue, but nothing serious or alarming.

We were glad to hear that. :)
 

imaplanner

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Just re-read this entire thread. I hope your tests go good Bear. As you know (I don't think I posted about this but I pm'd u about it) my wife was diagnosed with Hodgkins last January and went through ABVD, which is the standard. She was found to have completely responded during the mid-treatment scans, but recently had her regular three month follow up pet scan (the first one since finishing treatment) which shows Hodgkins returned. She now will be going through the stem cell transplant much like you did. I'll probably pm you with some questions at some point.
 

Bear Up North

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imaplanner.....My best wishes for success with the bone marrow stem cell transplant. I am available anytime for PMd questions.

Bear
 

Bear Up North

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Tests

This Bear is a horrible patient. I am so bad about scheduling and taking the medical tests and scans that have been prescribed. I am way overdue for a number of tests, including a PET Scan, chest X-Ray, various blood tests. These are all related to keeping Hodgkin's Lymphoma from returning to my bod. I gotta get on the ball and take care of biz.
_____

I went to the doctor today. Of course, she looked at my records and scolded me. My visit, though, was not related to my bone marrow transplant or anything along those cancerous lines. It has to do with my hands. :-c

Whenever my fingers get cold, such as if I am out in colder weather, holding a cold steering wheel on my rugged Toyota Tundra, or drinking a cold beverage in a can.....the tips of my fingers turn pure white. (Like my soul. ;))

I self-diagnosed, via the internet.....Raynaud's Phenomenon. The tiny blood vessels at the ends of the fingers have a circulation problem. The doctor confirmed my net diagnosis and has given me a script that should correct the problem. We shall see.

It doesn't hurt, there is no tingling or numbing. Just very white fingers. Maybe, in the best Cyburbia tradition (think injured toes, etc. :-c) I can snap a photo and post it. I would love to give all of you the finger.

Bear
 

michaelskis

Cyburbian
Messages
21,195
Points
60
Well, stress is getting to me now, and work helps calm me down!

This week we have to take the baby to the ER twice because of a viral respiratory issue (a bad cold) that was making it difficult for is two month old lungs to work. Oh there was also two regular doctor visits too.

As a couple of you also know, my mom was extremely ill last fall and was in a coma for better part of a month. We had already decided to pull the plug when she started showing activity again. Well we just learned that she has a very treatable cancer. Downfall is it is very treatable for an otherwise healthy person, which she is not. So between the frequent 7 hour trips back home for fundraiser dinners and for her to spend time with her Grandson, and trying to get him has healthy as possible, I have been a little stressed.

We all think that she will make it. After all, many of the doctors say that the reason she made it last time is because she was determined to spend time with her grandbaby. I think that it is partly that, partly too stubborn to give up on life.
 

SW MI Planner

Cyburbian
Messages
3,196
Points
27
Well, stress is getting to me now, and work helps calm me down!

This week we have to take the baby to the ER twice because of a viral respiratory issue (a bad cold) that was making it difficult for is two month old lungs to work. Oh there was also two regular doctor visits too.

As a couple of you also know, my mom was extremely ill last fall and was in a coma for better part of a month. We had already decided to pull the plug when she started showing activity again. Well we just learned that she has a very treatable cancer. Downfall is it is very treatable for an otherwise healthy person, which she is not. So between the frequent 7 hour trips back home for fundraiser dinners and for her to spend time with her Grandson, and trying to get him has healthy as possible, I have been a little stressed.

We all think that she will make it. After all, many of the doctors say that the reason she made it last time is because she was determined to spend time with her grandbaby. I think that it is partly that, partly too stubborn to give up on life.


Wow, I can't even imagine....sorry that you (and everyone posting in this thread) have to deal with this. I just found out that my grandmother has stg 4 bowel cancer, and it's very tough. I can't imagine it being a parent.
 

zman

Cyburbian
Messages
9,267
Points
34
Kind of in the same boat.

My grandmother, after a battle with "pneumonia" before Christmas was diagnosed with Stage 4 lung cancer. She had never smoked anything in her life and the doctor's say that sometimes lung cancer in people who haven't smoked is worse than in those that have.
She has been doing Chemo, a massive once-a-month all-day treatment since January and the entire family has been travelling to help out, particularly the week after her treatment when my grandfather needs help around the house, or someone to watch my grandmother so he can get OUT of the house. They have a good community and church that helps out with stuff.

Her next treatment is on March 17. It'll be our turn (my mother and me) to head out and we'll be flying to Memphis that day. My mother had already been out once before. It'll be good for me to see them and help out as well.

Despite the circumstances, I am happy to do it. :-\
 

ofos

Vintage Cyburbian
Messages
8,278
Points
28
Not having a good day here. My wife found a suspicious lump yesterday morning and is seeing the doctor today. Last night we found out that a good friend's wife passed away about a week ago at 53 from cancer.
 

Veloise

Cyburbian
Messages
6,093
Points
38
...My grandmother, after a battle with "pneumonia" before Christmas was diagnosed with Stage 4 lung cancer. She had never smoked anything in her life and the doctor's say that sometimes lung cancer in people who haven't smoked is worse than in those that have. ...

Bronchoalveolar. There's a reason I know this.

(brother and father smoke like chimneys, no adverse reactions, yet)
 

dandy_warhol

Cyburbian
Messages
10,304
Points
53
just got home from a 4 night stay in the hospital. i had/have a Pulmonary Embolism as the result of a DVT that broke apart. :-c

i'm ok. home from work for a week, on blood thinners for at least 6 months.

and the Dr. said most likely my days of playing soccer are over (concern over another blood clot.)
 
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