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Light Rail Overdue

bocian

Cyburbian
Messages
212
Points
9
Which American and Canadian cities do you think are ready to build and operate light rail? Disregard those that have them already in works (Victoria, Cinncinati, Minneapolis, etc).

FIY: My stand on sound public transit is this: it's not the technology utilized that matters but the quality of service provided and how comprehensive its coverage is.. In other words, I don't mind bus-only mass transit as long as its of notch quality (and, unfortunately, it almost never is..).

Anyway, so where is light rail overdue?
I'll start the list with my picks:

Albany, NY - the NY state capital area - regional rail past overdue (geez, even Raleigh area will have one soon, and that's in North Carolina)...

Halifax, NS = regional rail overdue

Winnipeg - light rail needed, look south to Minneapolis for clues..

Richmond, Syracuse, Kansas City, light rail needed, density to support it is there in many parts of these cities..

any thoughts/ideas?
 

Suburb Repairman

moderator in moderation
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
7,414
Points
34
Austin, TX - not all parts are suitable, but a smaller scale light rail could work in the downtown and surrounding areas. You've got a HUGE university and a fairly dense downtown by southern standards. Developers are coming in and beginning to create a housing presence in and around downtown. If Houston and Dallas can have light rail, why not Austin?
 

Bangorian

Member
Messages
198
Points
7
DETROIT For Heaven's Sake (but don't let GM know you're building it!)!!! Probably the longest overdue of anywhere.

Send a line to Monroe, Ann Arbor and one to Pontiac at least, if not Flint. Spurs could run to Rochester, Plymouth, Northville/Brighton, and other strong villages that aren't right along the lines. Perhaps one to Mt. Clemens or thereabouts would be in order as well?
 

donk

Cyburbian
Messages
6,970
Points
30
MaineMan said:
DETROIT For Heaven's Sake (but don't let GM know you're building it!)!!! Probably the longest overdue of anywhere.

What the people mover does not count?

As for Halifax, there has been a discussion of doing it, but the use and the location of the existing rail lines and opportunities for terminals has limited it. Any new locations would be greatly hampered by the topography of the downtown. This was discussed briefly on one of the mobile workshops at the CIP conference last year.
 

SkeLeton

Cyburbian
Messages
4,853
Points
26
Santiago....
The subway, while it still has some plans for expansion; doesn't fulfill the necesary public transport needs. The bus system is chaotic and if I had to give it a LOS grade it'll be around the D to F.
Light rail is being proposed to conect the northern municipalities with the rest of Santiago, although I'd also put a line tha goes to the airport, since a taxi is quite expensive.
 

Dan

Dear Leader
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
18,699
Points
69
MaineMan said:
Send a line to Monroe, Ann Arbor and one to Pontiac at least, if not Flint. Spurs could run to Rochester, Plymouth, Northville/Brighton, and other strong villages that aren't right along the lines. Perhaps one to Mt. Clemens or thereabouts would be in order as well?
I don't know about urban light rail in Detroit, but maybe a hybrid light rail interpretation of BART in San Francisco, or something like the commuter rail systems in Sydney and Melbourne that have some metro-like characteristics. The city'd population density took so much of a hit in the 1970s and 1980s, I don't think it could support light rail now.

Kansas City is way overdue for light rail. Milwaukee and Rochester are cities that one had light rail systems with rapid transit-like characteristics, but abandoned them in the 1950s. Austin would be easily doable, because the city is so linear.
 

Bangorian

Member
Messages
198
Points
7
Yes, I agree, something more like a commuter system - things tend to be very pocketed in Detroit (metro), but in the city proper especially. Really, there would only be a handful of stops within the city (Ren Cen, Wayne State, New Center, Comerica Park, etc.) that would make any sense at this point.
 

simulcra

Member
Messages
127
Points
6
Austin definitely needs Light Rail. I'd be willing to give BRT the benefit of the doubt there, since Austin does have lower corporate density in its CBD (contrasted to Dallas) and not-as-high downtown density as other cities with successful light rail.
 

Rumpy Tunanator

Cyburbian
Messages
4,473
Points
25
bocian said:
Albany, NY - the NY state capital area - regional rail past overdue (geez, even Raleigh area will have one soon, and that's in North Carolina)...
-I don't think Albany could support a light rail system or get the federal funding for it due to other cities with greater populations trying to get a piece of the pie. I've been to Albany many times and I just don't think it could work there. Raleigh also has a larger population than Albany (over 540,000 compared to 98,000), granted Raleigh is also less dense.

-As for Detriot's people mover, what a joke. People I've talked to there say they can walk faster to the place they are going than the "people mover" can get them there. Detriot should have a light-rail system, but being in the home of the auto-mobile, I don't think it would happen, not until at least the oil reserves dried up.

-I've heard Niagara Falls, Ontario might build a rail-system pretty soon and in Buffalo there is talk (and in the 2025 LRP) a connection out to the American side of the falls from Buffalo (I'll believe it when I see it) which would connect in the falls to high speed train service out to Toronto, although the priority now is to extend out to the airport which should have been done back in the late 1970's.

-Wasn't there a plan for high speed train service connecting SF, LA, Sacramento, etc. in California?
 

steveanne

Member
Messages
176
Points
7
There's a pretty good documentary on the Rochester Subway that operated from the late 20's to the mid 50's. Here's a link to where you could buy it if you wanted to (for those that don't, there is a two minute preview). It's the same one that was on the History Channel if you haven't seen it.

http://www.animatusstudio.com/videoproduction/subway.html

The interesting thing is a few groups want to use the abondoned rails from the old Rochester Subway for a light rail or trolley project that would run from the Fast Ferry terminal at the beach to downtown Rochester and possibly the Amtrak station, making stops at the High Falls entertainment district, Frontier Field, Blue Cross Arena, Eastman School of Music, Kodak and Bausch and Lomb headquarters, Xerox, the proposed downtown transit center and Performing Arts Center, and other highly residential areas. Here's a link to one of those groups.

http://www.rochestertrolleyrail.org/
 

plankton

Cyburbian
Messages
750
Points
21
Seattle-Tacoma I-5 corridor. (edit: maybe this one is considered "already in the hopper", but from one skeptic to another, I'll believe it when I see it..)

Now, about all this Detroit talk...the People Mover should be viewed purely as a novelty item, like the train that goes around the zoo.

A light rail line that runs up Woodward from the Joe to Royal Oak would be a good starter for Detroit.
 

benk928

Cyburbian
Messages
31
Points
2
Not a real creative response, but how about Norfolk, Virginia Beach, VA? It was proposed but shot down for reasons I don't understand. Maybe because it was part of a package for more highways.

-ben
 

doinky

Cyburbian
Messages
94
Points
4
austin

Austin has a better case for LRT than even Dallas did, according to what I heard about the FTA's ratings. (UT counteracts the slightly less dense CBD; although both Dallas' and Austin's CBDs well exceed what's necessary for LRT).

BRT sucks. Big-time. Unfortunately, thanks to the interference of some state legislators, I think that's what we're going to get.
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
Messages
10,080
Points
34
As a liberal community, Madison has discussed the idea of light rail practically to death. It is appealing because it is glitzy and new. It is to mass transit in the 2000's what monorails were in the 1970's. The concept to emerge is one doomed to failure. A train is planned that will run on existing tracks from the west end of town to the community just east of Madison. There are not enough people on the route to make it worthwhile. Most will have to commute by car to a parking lot (not provided) where they then have to get on the train for at most a five-mile ride downtown. Stick to buses. The most sensible rail plan would go out 15-20 miles beyond the city to intercept the people commuting in from the rural hinterland, not relying on "light rail," but on simple, self-powered rail cars. This would also serve the many people working in huge east and west side business parks.
 

doinky

Cyburbian
Messages
94
Points
4
"stick to buses"

"stick to buses" never works for choice commuters unless you're in one of the 0.1% of jobs in your urban area that doesn't provide free parking. BRT would address the speed and reliability deficits of city buses IF they were ever implemented as originally proposed (like in Curitaba), but, of course, the dedicated runningway is always the first thing to go when the implementation phase begins. And of course buses in HOV lanes (sometimes lumped in with BRT) only help the people who live outside the point at which your bus enters the freeway/HOV facility (since if they live closer in they won't be able to get _on_ the bus unless a weird Seattle-like facility is built).
 
Messages
8
Points
0
@doinky:
Is there still a contingent who are against overhead lines down that street (apologies, Congress? or other?) that has a constant view of the TxStCap building? I thought I remembered some news about that from the Austin A.S. paper a few years ago.

(Tangent: What about the A-SA corridor commuter rail? Still mentioned?)
 

FueledByRamen

Cyburbian
Messages
449
Points
13
Suburb Repairman said:
Austin, TX - not all parts are suitable, but a smaller scale light rail could work in the downtown and surrounding areas. You've got a HUGE university and a fairly dense downtown by southern standards. Developers are coming in and beginning to create a housing presence in and around downtown. If Houston and Dallas can have light rail, why not Austin?
If CapMetro got a hold of it though, you'd have 5 rails running side by side between Leander and Round Rock.

While I wish with all my heart that we could do light rail in this town, I strongly fear that it would never take hold. There are really two types of people when it comes to this issue in Austin: Those that want it badly and would ride it everyday, and those who would never get on it and won't agree to spend one penny on the project. As it is, sadly, I think that second group is more numerous.

Troy, there are contingents (and laws, even) that are against anything in the air...especially if they block the view of the Cap Building. I think that lines, however, would be agree-able to those people that would otherwise be against them since they are probably the ones that support light rail in the first place.

And to continue on your tangent...There is a group that wants to put a commuter rail between Georgetown, Round Rock, and Austin....as well as Governer Perry who wants to put in a high speed (think EuroRail-200mph) train that links Dallas, Austin, Houston, and San Antonio with a hub in Bryan, I think.

Anyway, I better get to class...

Adam
 
Messages
8
Points
0
Thanks Ramen.

It was a vague memory in my head re: if it were a law or just people who were opposed to overhead lines obstructing the Cap bldg.

Regarding Perry's Trans-Texas Corridor vision. Being relatively close to the 'action' et al, has there been any serious progress that you are aware of since the middle of last year? I know a lot of Dallasites very interested in this. I'm sure the same can be said for most major Tx cities involved.

Anyhow, back to LRT possibilites in Austin. When might a revised plan go back on a ballot for vote there, if it does?
 

doinky

Cyburbian
Messages
94
Points
4
Austin

Troy-by-the-Sea said:
@doinky:
Is there still a contingent who are against overhead lines down that street (apologies, Congress? or other?) that has a constant view of the TxStCap building? I thought I remembered some news about that from the Austin A.S. paper a few years ago.
That was a minor blip. In fact, the voters in the city of Austin passed the plan by a fair margin (55-45 or thereabouts); it was the areas outside the city but still inside the service area which killed it.

Well, that, and the fact that the pantload state rep Mike Krusee forced Cap Metro to have the election in '00, when they weren't quite ready, playing into the hands of the people who wanted to tear down the plan for not being baked enough...
 

bocian

Cyburbian
Messages
212
Points
9
benk928 said:
Not a real creative response, but how about Norfolk, Virginia Beach, VA? It was proposed but shot down for reasons I don't understand. Maybe because it was part of a package for more highways.

-ben
They will "look" into LR option there along with what it seems to be the preferred alternative in more conservative / oil dependent southern states, BTW.

See the article right here:

http://home.hamptonroads.com/stories/story.cfm?story=64929&ran=98878
 

metroboi

Cyburbian
Messages
49
Points
2
Actually Raleigh is putting in a Commuter Rail system, not LRT. It will connnect the 3 municipalities that make up that metro, Raleigh, Durham and Chapel Hill.
 

simulcra

Member
Messages
127
Points
6
FueledByRamen said:
as well as Governer Perry who wants to put in a high speed (think EuroRail-200mph) train that links Dallas, Austin, Houston, and San Antonio with a hub in Bryan, I think.
However cool a concept linking the cities with high-speed rail sounds, what would be the real point? I mean, honestly, the rail would carry people who wouldn't be driving in cars. once they arrive in a given city, they would have to walk or rely on transit (small in Dallas still, although there's promise, miniscule in Houston, almost nonexistent in San Antonio?) to get to their jobs if not in the immediate vicinity of (i'm assuming the stop would be) the CBD station. That's not a terribly large amount of commuters, especially since most of the population would be living in suburbs outside of highspeed rail stops and would require a commute just to get to (and you might as well just find a job within your own city if you're doing that).

Of course, what I just said are based on vast assumptions and I could be wrong and Texas is set to be the European model of transit. (Oustide of Austin I tend to be very pessimistic about Texas cities. Even in Austin i maintain a level of cynicism and pessimism.)
 

Big Easy King

Cyburbian
Messages
1,361
Points
23
Definitely Overdue in N.O.

An LRT system, which is currently being proposed and evaluated for New Orleans, is definitely needed and certainly would be a very vital aspect of the City's future development and growth. However, the project is very likely to fail because local politicians seem to be only interested in establishing a short-term solution (commuter rail transit system) rather than planning for long-term benefits and economic vitality (LRT system).

That type of nonprogressive development mentality is what primarily prevents New Orleans from competing economically with other cities like Chicago, D.C., etc. It's difficult for the City to attract major companies/corporations when politics is a hinderance to so many needed projects that would assist with effective development and growth.
 

FueledByRamen

Cyburbian
Messages
449
Points
13
Solipsa said:
However cool a concept linking the cities with high-speed rail sounds, what would be the real point? I mean, honestly, the rail would carry people who wouldn't be driving in cars. once they arrive in a given city, they would have to walk or rely on transit (small in Dallas still, although there's promise, miniscule in Houston, almost nonexistent in San Antonio?) to get to their jobs if not in the immediate vicinity of (i'm assuming the stop would be) the CBD station.
Well, I think the only hope for a system such as this is that it would be high speed and could cut the typical auto travel times by ~70%. Dallas to Austin by car is about three and a half hours. If Texas somehow forked over the billion need for a Maglev train, this would be cut to about an hour or less...depending on if there was a stop in Waco which is about halfway. If you can get there that quickly, I think most people wouldn't mind hopping on a bus or the Dart.

That's not a terribly large amount of commuters, especially since most of the population would be living in suburbs outside of highspeed rail stops and would require a commute just to get to (and you might as well just find a job within your own city if you're doing that).
Well, the commuter rail that is in the planning stages for CenTex would be seperate from any HSR system. I dont think that HSR would be used that much for commuting short distances such as this.

Of course, what I just said are based on vast assumptions and I could be wrong and Texas is set to be the European model of transit. (Oustide of Austin I tend to be very pessimistic about Texas cities. Even in Austin i maintain a level of cynicism and pessimism.)
Its not. Our tranist sucks. And I hate that. Dallas is the leading city with its DART system and San Antonio has one of the better bus systems in the south, but it still isnt great. Public transit in Texas, with the exception of DART is mainly used by working class and minorities.

My dream would be to have Dallas, Ft Worth, Austin, San Antonio, and I guess Houston (even though I hate that place) all linked by HSR and all having a LRT system in place. I think we could find a better and quicker alternative to car travel this way. Would people buy into it?

....hey, I said it was my dream, didnt I? :(
 

teshadoh

Cyburbian
Messages
435
Points
13
I would like Charleston, Sc to develop a light rail. The urban area already has the density on the peninsula, limited parking, high tourism base, geographic constrainments, & rail ROW. One or two lines could go from the northern suburbs through North Charleston through the business area & into the college, hospital, government sector in Charleston then transferring into a street line. In addition a line could cross the Ashley & Cooper rivers connecting Mount Pleasant with Johns Island.

With limited automobile crossings - even with the new freeway - Charleston could easily handle a decent ridership volume. In addition to plentiful rail ROW land between North Charleston & Charleston.
 

Belle

Cyburbian
Messages
142
Points
6
teshadoh said:
I would like Charleston, Sc to develop a light rail. The urban area already has the density on the peninsula, limited parking, high tourism base, geographic constrainments, & rail ROW. One or two lines could go from the northern suburbs through North Charleston through the business area & into the college, hospital, government sector in Charleston then transferring into a street line. In addition a line could cross the Ashley & Cooper rivers connecting Mount Pleasant with Johns Island.

With limited automobile crossings - even with the new freeway - Charleston could easily handle a decent ridership volume. In addition to plentiful rail ROW land between North Charleston & Charleston.

I completely agree with you...I've been saying for years that Charleston would be a perfect candidate for light rail as there are only three ways into the city (down I-26 and 17 from West Ashley and Mount Pleasant). However, the political climate is just not there (last I checked, the bus system, CARTA, is in imminent danger of shutdown). Gas is just too cheap in SC, Charleston doesn't face air pollution issues because of the sea breezes, and the new bridge to Mount Pleasant is supposed to "fix everything" with regard to traffic. I like the idea, though.
 

biscuit

Cyburbian
Messages
3,904
Points
25
Belle said:
I completely agree with you...I've been saying for years that Charleston would be a perfect candidate for light rail as there are only three ways into the city (down I-26 and 17 from West Ashley and Mount Pleasant). However, the political climate is just not there (last I checked, the bus system, CARTA, is in imminent danger of shutdown). Gas is just too cheap in SC, Charleston doesn't face air pollution issues because of the sea breezes, and the new bridge to Mount Pleasant is supposed to "fix everything" with regard to traffic. I like the idea, though.
Light rail in Chucktown (hey, another city nickname) was discussed to many times to count in many of my planning classes at the local institute of higher learning. Like you pointed out, the density, incoming traffic, and infill urban development in the Neck and around the convention center in North Charleston is enough to warrant a small light rail system. But like Belle pointed out, the political climate is just not right for that in SC right now. There was serious talk during the planning stages of the new Cooper River Bridge to Mt. Pleasant to dedicate one of the lanes for light rail should a system be introduced in the future. But the SC DOT (in their infinite wisdome) decided that a bridge designed to last 100 years or more would need that extra lane for traffic. :-\

Public transit in South Carolina is deplorable. It's pretty sad when the only nearly viable transit system in the state is not in one of the larger cities but in the small town of Clemson.
 
Messages
7
Points
0
Well.. I have been lurking for a while, but I might as well add something now.

I think that the commuter rail idea for Halifax is pretty much dead. It has been dropped in favour of more ferry routes, especially one to Bedford, which will most likely be served by one of these Australian catamarans. They travel at 28 knots (compared to 8 knots for the Dartmouth ferries) and cost on the order of $5M each. They will likely be very successful in Bedford since the two ways into the city are so congested and are less direct.. there would be big time savings over driving. I am not sure what operating costs are like compared to the diesel trains that were proposed before.

No track required, and there are no NIMBYs to complain.

Halifax could use trolleys in the city though. Lines for Gottingen Street and Quinpool Road, two local commercial streets, would make a huge difference.
 
Messages
23
Points
3
oakland you say?

yes, i said it. oakland, though it is served by bart, most of the densest neighborhoods are skirted by the mainly commuter rail system. bart does a good job passing by neighborhoods to speed commuters into san francisco, but in places like east oakland, the route took place over mostly industrial areas in order to justify not stopping in oakland. light rail would be a very welcome sight along the east 14th st (international blvd) corridor in east oakland and along san pablo avenue to the north through berkeley and onto richmond. will this ever happen? probably not
 
Messages
94
Points
4
here are a couple of cities I believe, that are ready for starter light rail systems.

Louisville - the density has been there for years, and there was talk about establishing a system for a while, but unfortunately rail will not be happening. The officials felt the money should be used to construct more automobile bridges across the river.

Orlando - This city desperately needs another transporation alternative to a traffic clogged I-4. A light rail line between Winter Park, downtown, and the tourist areas to the south would draw great ridership. From my understanding, the state, and federal governments were willing to fund 80% of the costs for a rail system in the late 1990's, but local officials rejected it.

Richmond - I don't know too much about this city, but from my visits there, it looks like it has a large enough core to light rail a success.

Jacksonville - This city, suprising, has a large enough core to support a starter light rail or commuter rail system. Large neighborhoods like Riverside, San Marco, Springfield, Durkeeville, etc. all are dense enough and close enough to downtown to be able to supply light rail with a steady stream of ridership. Any connection of downtown to the airport or Jax Beach also has great potential to draw high ridership, as well as, relieve streets like Atlantic & Beach Blvds. It would also draw more people on the Skyway system, with a transfer station downtown.

However, this will never happen due to the high cost and bad press of the Skyway system. Because of its poor route planning, the future of rail transit has forever been ruined in Jacksonville.
 

Miles Ignatius

Cyburbian
Messages
368
Points
12
A Work In Process

I'm late in joining the fray here but wanted to mention Denver's light rail.

Since 1995, we've had a "stunted" system running between a non-end destination neighborhood east of downtown and then south to the 'burbs along an industrial corridor. Despite the alignment issues, ridership has outstripped expectations and a new alignment associated with the I-25 reconstruction ("T-REX") will be coming on line over the next few years. There's already a fair amount of TOD planned for that line.

A more ambitous plan ("FastTracks") will be on the ballot in November which will extend service west to Golden and Arvada, north to Longmont and Thornton [commuter 'heavy rail']and east along the I-70 corridor to DIA [a real no-brainer; this should have been built at the same the airport was.]

It stands to reason that the plan should have a good chance of approval given the rise in gas prices but it's also less than an ideal time to get appoval for the increase in the sales tax to fund it - about 4 cents on $10 purchase. Most of the major employers, CofC types, and city of Denver leadership (Mayor John Hickenlooper) are behind it.

Opposition is from the usual suspects -local self appointed anti-mass transportation guru Jon Caldera ("One Man, One Car") has rounded up fellow pavement zealot Randal O'Toole to populate the Op-Ed pages and airwaves with their rhetoric.

I'll keep you posted.
 

SeaninSeattle

Member
Messages
5
Points
0
Puget Sound

The entire Seattle metro region needs light rail. With only 4 million people and a very limited rail system, it's way, way overdue! Several measures have been voted up and down, and now we have Sound Transit - but it's very late, and we have grid-lock daily.

//sse
 

Cirrus

Cyburbian
Messages
303
Points
11
Providence
Hartford
Richmond
Kansas City
Milwaukee
Louisville
Honolulu

New Orleans has and is rapidly expanding a streetcar network.

Norfolk, IIRC, is trying to go ahread with a shorter LRT that wouldn't go all the way to VA Beach.
 

monkeyflower

Cyburbian
Messages
58
Points
4
MaineMan said:
DETROIT For Heaven's Sake (but don't let GM know you're building it!)!!! Probably the longest overdue of anywhere.

Send a line to Monroe, Ann Arbor and one to Pontiac at least, if not Flint. Spurs could run to Rochester, Plymouth, Northville/Brighton, and other strong villages that aren't right along the lines. Perhaps one to Mt. Clemens or thereabouts would be in order as well?
They're working on it. Sort of.

A study circa 1999 looked at Detroit-Lansing on every possible route between those two cities. Now they're looking at Detroit-Ann Arbor, likely via Ypsilanti, DTW, and Dearborn. A VP of the Ann Arbor Transportation Authority gave me an "about 5 years" timeline for the Ann Arbor-Detroit line.

Considering that the study's website (the terribly named http://www.annarbordetroitrapidtransitstudy.com/) has an "updates" section with *nothing* posted to it (the study is approaching the midpoint of its 18 month run), I'm not too hopeful.
 

biscuit

Cyburbian
Messages
3,904
Points
25
SeaninSeattle said:
The entire Seattle metro region needs light rail. With only 4 million people and a very limited rail system, it's way, way overdue! Several measures have been voted up and down, and now we have Sound Transit - but it's very late, and we have grid-lock daily.

//sse
Like a Supertrain? ;-)

Cirrus said:
Richmond would greatly benefit by just simply re-establishing the streetcar down Broad St. from the Fan down to Shockoe Bottom, or even beyond to the new developments along the James River.
 
Messages
7
Points
0
The Tampa/St. Petersburg area is overdue.

Lots of people, lots of sprawl, two major downtowns that are relatively far apart.

Perhaps a line could begin in Brandon, go to downtown Tampa and Ybor City, continue by bridge to St. Petersburg, and then north to Clearwater.

It could continue north to Clearwater, which is also a very large city. Stops at a few of the beaches.

Just to make the Brandon to Tampa link (11 miles), they're spending at least $365 million on an elevated highway that's only going to be one way. And, they've stopped construction because part of it collapsed and other parts sunk into the ground.

Another line could go from some of the neighborhoods in South Tampa that have no highway access, intersect the first line downtown and continue north to Land O'Lakes.

If you hear the traffic report in Tampa, it takes four times as long as other cities because of all the accidents.

Many people in Tampa hail from New York and other cities with public transit and would be used to using it. When the Yankees play there, the stadium is half full of Yankees fans (and the other half empty)
 

Miles Ignatius

Cyburbian
Messages
368
Points
12
Miles Ignatius said:
Update 11/3: It Passed! 59 to 41% :D
The $4.7 billion proposal will help fund the Regional Transportation District's 12-year build-out of 119 miles of light rail and diesel-powered commuter trains on six new corridors, extensions to three existing light rail lines, including the T-REX line, a new style of rapid bus service on the Boulder Turnpike and a new network of suburban bus connections.

When completed in 2017, FasTracks will reshape how people get around Denver as well as channel land development into a tighter and less sprawling pattern. It promises to speed commute times and offer an alternative to bumper-to-bumper traffic,
 

Rumpy Tunanator

Cyburbian
Messages
4,473
Points
25
Good for Denver, I wish I could say the same about here (if we could ever extend rail, let alone reverse the population decline).
 

nighthawk1959

Cyburbian
Messages
334
Points
11
Charlotte?

The way Charlotte is spread out makes it a canditate for some sort of rail system. The pressence of existing rail lines would make this a no brainer except for one thing. It ain't a pro sports team. This town is strange.
 

Miles Ignatius

Cyburbian
Messages
368
Points
12
Just Be Patient......

Rumpy Tunanator said:
Good for Denver, I wish I could say the same about here (if we could ever extend rail, let alone reverse the population decline).
Rumpy - I jknow this came up on another thread but I think the Queen City's population will cease to decline when the implications of the continuing growth in the drought plagued and water-starved Southwest become apparent to those living there and the great "reverse migration" starts back to the Great Lakes....

Miles
 

SideshowBob

Cyburbian
Messages
110
Points
6
bocian said:
New Brunswick, NJ. Worcester, MA. Hartford, CT.
Hartford is going for BRT all the way. The first--SW to New Britain--will be running in 2010 or so. They are talking about having four lines going into Hartford, though the north one is losing much momentum.

You will never see LRT in Hartford, is my guess. I think BRT is OK, though. It serves somewhat like rail transit, and is more flexible, with local routes running right onto the "Track" without dropping riders off to transfer. I don't know if it will ever overcome the "rail bias" issue for riders with a choice, though.
 
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