Like an Invasive Species

Dan

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#2
Welcome to Cyburbia! I'd going to have to check that out.

We're becoming ground zero for invasive species -- zebra mussels, purple loosestrife, emerald ash borer, Chinese stink bugs, Hemlock wooly adelgid, hydrilla, round goby, buckthorn, garlic mustard, ghetto palms, and the most dangerous, wild parsnip and giant hogweed. (I live in an a part of the Finger Lakes region where there's an especially high concentration of giant hogweed -- nasty, nasty stuff.) I don't know if the podcast deals with that, or just makes a comparison, but it sounds interesting.
 
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#3
The amount of castor bean growth in areas of our local forest that burned last winter is very sad. There are places where it's like walking through a castor bean tunnel with plants taller than your head, and the fire was only 14 months ago. :(
 
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#4
Welcome to Cyburbia! I'd going to have to check that out.

We're becoming ground zero for invasive species -- zebra mussels, purple loosestrife, emerald ash borer, Chinese stink bugs, Hemlock wooly adelgid, hydrilla, round goby, buckthorn, garlic mustard, ghetto palms, and the most dangerous, wild parsnip and giant hogweed. (I live in an a part of the Finger Lakes region where there's an especially high concentration of giant hogweed -- nasty, nasty stuff.) I don't know if the podcast deals with that, or just makes a comparison, but it sounds interesting.
Check it out and tell me what you think 🤔
 
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#5
The amount of castor bean growth in areas of our local forest that burned last winter is very sad. There are places where it's like walking through a castor bean tunnel with plants taller than your head, and the fire was only 14 months ago. :(
Did you listen to the podcast? What did you think? In regards to your issue to you think low intensity high frequency prescribed burning would help manage the issues?
 
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