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Looking for a City :-{}

michaelskis

Cyburbian
Messages
19,985
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49
With the understanding that all cities are different in some way, I am looking for a few examples of cities that are the same in demographics, size, history, and current status.

Looking:
for a city of around 80,000 with roots in intense industrial development and railroads. A built environment, increasing Latino population, mostly low income, historic buildings, dense buildings, and limited higher education would be a plus.

I have found allot of places that are the close, but they all had universities which made up 20% of there population, and a much higher income rate. Any help would be great.

Thank you!!!
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
Messages
10,080
Points
34
Waukegan, Illinois comes to mind. I do no know about the buildings being "historic," but they are generally older. It is a poor and largely minority city, among some fairy affluent Chicago suburbs.

Green Bay, Wisconsin, home to the finest football team in the world, is also about the right size.
 

mike gurnee

Cyburbian
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3,066
Points
31
Huntington WV. Don't know about the hispanics, and if there are any union jobs left, the income levels may be too high.
 

Jeff

Cyburbian
Messages
4,161
Points
27
Right down the street from you...Bethlehem, PA. Double check the population stats though.

Scranton, PA too
 

BKM

Cyburbian
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6,463
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29
From my former neck of the woods, and the industry is still there, to a certain extent:

Muncie, Anderson, and Kokomo Indiana (heavy industry-auto parts)

Not sure how relevant, given that its a little bigger and the newer parts are more affluent commuter country, but Vallejo, California-had a huge shipyard at one point
 

Bullwinkle

Cyburbian
Messages
176
Points
7
BKM said:
From my former neck of the woods, and the industry is still there, to a certain extent:

Muncie, Anderson, and Kokomo Indiana (heavy industry-auto parts)

I thought about Muncie, too. Because of the university it doesn't really fit the description. Kokomo, on the other hand, probably fits pretty well.
 

Dan

Dear Leader
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
18,551
Points
69
A few that came to mind right away ... Pueblo, Colorado (a perfect match, IMHO); Kansas City, Kansas and Allentown, Pennsylvania. All industrial, all with plenty of railroads, all with significant or growing Hispanic populations.
 

LouisvilleSlugger

Cyburbian
Messages
216
Points
9
Mud Princess said:
Try Amsterdam, NY... It meets most of your criteria except maybe the 80,000 population.
Yes Yes, Amsterdam does! I know of that place.
I think Shelbyville, KY might fit into what your looking for as well...
 

LouisvilleSlugger

Cyburbian
Messages
216
Points
9
Bullwinkle said:
I thought about Muncie, too. Because of the university it doesn't really fit the description. Kokomo, on the other hand, probably fits pretty well.
I think Anderson, IN is a good fit. not sure about the pop. though but all the other criteria seem to fit in nicely. I was there a few years back and was surprised to see such a big Latino prescence there...
 

LouisvilleSlugger

Cyburbian
Messages
216
Points
9
Maroon said:
I would think that Purdue would make Lafayette ineligible.

How about Elkhart, IN? A bit small, at 51,000 people.

RV capital of the country, purveyor of ine musical instruments, Alka-Seltzer, and Flintstones vitamins.

Home of the National New York Central Railroad Museum
hmm..true..I think I was more or less focusing on the city of Lafayette alone without West Lafayette..but yeah, if you look at the county as a whole or Lafayette and West Lafayette then your right with Purdue making it ineligible.
 

HowardL

Member
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1
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0
You might want to take a look at Cicero. It's one of Chicago's inner Western suburbs. It's around the population you're looking for (maybe 70,000 +/-), one of the belt railways separates it from Chicago and it has/had a good industrial base.

The Mexican population has grown amazingly in the past decades. 26th Street which is one of the centers of Mexican culture in the city cuts across Cicero, so a lot of second generation population growth has gone west.

On top of that it, along with neighboring Berwyn, are bungalow central - incredible, solid housing stock that goes on for block after block. The history is colorful and the politics (starring Federal prisoner and former long time mayor, Betty Loren-Maltese) are second to none.

The whole area is really reinventing itself. It's interesting to watch all of the kids who grew up on 26th Street moving out to these neighborhoods.

If you get a chance, give it a look. It may be close to what you're looking for.
 

boiker

Cyburbian
Messages
3,890
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26
i was thinking cicero and berwyn to but they developed in a response to the growth of chicago...inititally.. not an independent industrial/railroad type town.

Aurora, IL might be a good example.
Joliet, IL too
 
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