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Rant Lowest salaries for planning jobs that you've seen

azmodela

Cyburbian
Messages
97
Points
4
I don't know, expat. That appears to be a decent second job for a planner.
However, the job is in Frisco, CO, a place with a high housing cost. Frisco is near Breckenridge, Vail, etc. I'm sure in the winter you would have a hard time affording local rents while working there.
 
Messages
3
Points
0
Here is an example of what a bus driver makes in Toronto.
And if you check oppi website there is about 6 job listings for planners, meanwhile the planning schools expand their departments like planning is the next big thing.

Basic Qualifications:
•A Grade 12 secondary school diploma or the equivalent
Frequently Asked Questions - Grade 12 High School Diploma Requirement
•Demonstrated ability to communicate effectively
•Some prior customer service experience
•Be able to work a flexible work schedule that includes various shifts and off days
•Large vehicle driving experience is considered an asset

The TTC offers competitive wages and benefits including: Healthcare and Dental plans, Group Life Insurance and a Pension Plan. As per the Local 113 ATU Collective Agreement, the starting hourly wage rate for this opportunity is $21.90 (rate after training) to 28.57 (ater 24 months).
 

expat123

Cyburbian
Messages
130
Points
6
Yeah urban planning is a joke, especially in the USA,. A masters degree in urban planning is a ticket to a lifetime of poverty in most cases. Here is an example a friend sent me from Chicago, All for 35-40k, and he had a masters with 5 years experience for Chicago!!. Jesus, 5 days vacation, I think a riot would happen in Australia for this. 4 weeks is standard here, plus free healthcare. That bus driver job looks more appealing, and probably more public respect. What a joke

Relationship Coordinator
Job Description
WPB is hiring a Relationship Coordinator. The Relationship Coordinator will manage all aspects
of the contracts held by WPB, from soliciting bids to monitoring contracts to maintaining regular
communication with vendors. The Relationship Coordinator will also act as the “face” of WPB,
meeting business owners throughout the district to inform them of WPB’s services, programs,
meetings, etc. The Relationship Coordinator will also assist the WPB Program Manager with
project tasks as they arise, such as assisting with the annual budget and program evaluations,
working with City Departments and Aldermanic offices, applying for permits, and preparing for
committee and Commission meetings.
The ideal candidate will:
• Have previous experience managing a variety of relationships with both vendors,
stakeholders, and elected officials,
• Be confident in communicating schedules, complaints, concerns, etc. with vendors and
stakeholders,
• Be comfortable communicating with stakeholders regarding the services provided by
WPB,
• Be able to accept criticism from stakeholders and work with vendors to correct any
issues,
• Have excellent communication skills and exercise a high level of discretion in daily
communications,
• Be able to take direction and work independently on tasks,
• Have a high level of self-discipline to manage time in the office and in the field to
accomplish all tasks and manage all responsibilities,
• Give a high level of attention to detail when reviewing contracts and correspondence,
• Be comfortable communicating both verbally and in writing with direct supervisor, coworkers,
vendors, stakeholders, and other members of the community,
• Live in or near the Wicker Park and Bucktown neighborhoods, and/or be very familiar
with the area.
The Relationship Coordinator will be an employee of the Wicker Park-Bucktown Chamber of
Commerce, and will report directly to the WPB Program Manager. Hours are 9am-5pm, Monday
– Friday, with some time required outside of normal business hours to manage contracts
(particularly during winter months to manage snow removal contracts) and attend monthly
Commission and committee meetings. The Relationship Coordinator will be expected to spend
approximately 50% of each week outside the office, in the field, walking throughout the district
to establish relationships with business owners and monitor work done by vendors. Bilingual
English/Spanish desired but not required.
Salary will be commensurate with experience. Benefits include 8 paid holidays, 5 sick days, and
5 vacation days in the first year of employment. Vacation days increase to 10 during the second
year of employment. A stipend for health insurance is available after 30 day probationary
period. An FSA is available after 1 year of employment. Simple IRA available after 2 years of
employment.
No phone calls please.
 

MacheteJames

Cyburbian
Messages
974
Points
21
That job description doesn't specify any kind of education requirements and doesn't actually sound like planning per se; more of a downtown coordinator type of position. Did your friend apply for this position, expat?

My job actually had 5 days of vacation the first year as well. It was the pits, that's for sure, especially after relocating to a new area where visiting family and friends back home required taking time off.
 

expat123

Cyburbian
Messages
130
Points
6
My mate in Chicago forwarded that to me. He has 5 years experience and a Masters. I guess he wanted 50-60k for the job and he got an email back saying they wanted 35-40k with limited health insurance. Jesus Im glad Im not working in the USA anymore, got out before the bubble burst. I could drive a fork lift and make more money and be more respected by the public. Urban planning=socialist in the USA. Just ask Randall O'toole from the Cato Institute.
 

nrschmid

Cyburbian
Messages
2,868
Points
21
From Harlingen, TX:

The employee frequently is required to sit and use hands and fingers. The
employee is occasionally required to reach with hands and arms; crouch;


It sounds kinda dirty: siting and using hands and fingers...but for what? What am I reaching for with my hands and arms?

I dunno, that sounds more like a $28,000/year job to me, especially since I ALSO have to crouch.
 

expat123

Cyburbian
Messages
130
Points
6
The employee frequently is required to sit and use hands and fingers. The
employee is occasionally required to reach with hands and arms; crouch;
Remember this is Texas, a state where legally retarded people cam get the chair. Cyburbia should send these places a prize for lowest paying jobs. Im with Dan 110%, people that take these jobs just bring the job standards down for everyone else.

We must also remember low pay, long hours in government planning jobs= more likely to be corrupt. We have had several rural planners be charged with corruption in Australia, they have often quoted long hours and little pay as the motivation.
 

jdplanner

Cyburbian
Messages
40
Points
2
Another very low paying job!!!


Position Description: Zoning Administrator

Pay Grade: 16 Salary: $26,769 - $39,332

Position Type: Full Time

Close Date: Until Filled

Type of Application Required: County

Education and Experience

Requires a Bachelor’s degree in city and regional planning, business administration or other relevant field supplemented by one to two years of planning/zoning administration experience, or an equivalent combination of education, training and experience that provides the required knowledge, skills and abilities. EEO
 

mike gurnee

Cyburbian
Messages
3,066
Points
31
jd, that post is for a county, most likely in the southeast. The difference between the salary and what it costs to live is made up through the graft and corruption. :D

I saw an ad for a KS county that wants an Economic Development Director and Emergency Management Director: combined. I would like to chat with the person that has the skills for both.
 

Dan

Dear Leader
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
18,696
Points
69
jd, that post is for a county, most likely in the southeast.
Greenwood County, South Carolina. I'm naming names because their Planning Department Web site has a link to "that other site", but not here. :D

I really, really hope planning salaries in some places don't account for graft. It would be like the pay scheme for Mexican police officers. I seldom hear about it in the planning profession in the US, but then again, maybe people are good at keeping it hush-hush.
 

The One

Cyburbian
Messages
8,289
Points
30
Oh yeah.....

jd, that post is for a county, most likely in the southeast. The difference between the salary and what it costs to live is made up through the graft and corruption. :D

I saw an ad for a KS county that wants an Economic Development Director and Emergency Management Director: combined. I would like to chat with the person that has the skills for both.
I have mad skills for that job....but I won't take it for a penny less than $21,432.56;)
 

chocolatechip

Cyburbian
Messages
852
Points
15
Here is an example of what a bus driver makes in Toronto.
And if you check oppi website there is about 6 job listings for planners, meanwhile the planning schools expand their departments like planning is the next big thing.

Basic Qualifications:
•A Grade 12 secondary school diploma or the equivalent
Frequently Asked Questions - Grade 12 High School Diploma Requirement
•Demonstrated ability to communicate effectively
•Some prior customer service experience
•Be able to work a flexible work schedule that includes various shifts and off days
•Large vehicle driving experience is considered an asset

The TTC offers competitive wages and benefits including: Healthcare and Dental plans, Group Life Insurance and a Pension Plan. As per the Local 113 ATU Collective Agreement, the starting hourly wage rate for this opportunity is $21.90 (rate after training) to 28.57 (ater 24 months).
Bus driving is one of the most stressful jobs out there.
 

Emson

Member
Messages
1
Points
0
I've had my doubts about staying in planning due to a low/working wage. I am pretty disgusted with the high expectations for entry level jobs (graduate degree, a few years of experience, AICP, etc.), high level of stress dealing with residents, politicians, etc, skyrocketing costs everywhere (healthcare, energy, etc.) and low compensation afforded to planners. I would like to earn a nice six figure salary in my mid-forties running a design firm (15-20 years from now). If I don't, I will probably get out of planning and landscape architecture all together, go back to school AGAIN for a JD and then practice corporate law.
I have to agree - I got into this field looking to pull down the typically high architect salary - and while I like the design aspect, I wonder if I'd have been better off becoming an actuary (the other high-paying field I'd considered). Could be just the economic downturn behind the dismal opportunities I'm facing, but it looks like planners don't have it much better. :-c
 

expat123

Cyburbian
Messages
130
Points
6
I have to agree - I got into this field looking to pull down the typically high architect salary - and while I like the design aspect, I wonder if I'd have been better off becoming an actuary (the other high-paying field I'd considered). Could be just the economic downturn behind the dismal opportunities I'm facing, but it looks like planners don't have it much better.
Dude, the link to Glassdoor is predominately for IT ARCHITECTS. Very different indeed. Architects are just as poor as planners, and probably more skilled in most cases. Nothing better than 30-40k with a masters, certifications, 20 plus software program knowledge, and long hours to complete a project.

Teachers make more than US urban planners on average now, plus you get the summers off. The ones I know in the US that were in their 40-50s making 120-200k, are now on food stamps or bankrupt businesses. It will pick up again in around 5 years, but the cycle will just repeat as the politicians havent learned the lessons. Face it, urban planning will never get a bailout. Unless there is drastic changes to the field in the US, OZ and UK, its all the same. Go to Asia or the Middle East if you wanna make $$ as a planner.
 

Brocktoon

Cyburbian
Messages
3,728
Points
22
jd, that post is for a county, most likely in the southeast. The difference between the salary and what it costs to live is made up through the graft and corruption. :D

I saw an ad for a KS county that wants an Economic Development Director and Emergency Management Director: combined. I would like to chat with the person that has the skills for both.
I have 4 years of economic development experience and have passed NIMS 100,200, 700, and 800 classes...so I guess I am qualified.
 

Dan

Dear Leader
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
18,696
Points
69
I have to agree - I got into this field looking to pull down the typically high architect salary - and while I like the design aspect, I wonder if I'd have been better off becoming an actuary (the other high-paying field I'd considered). Could be just the economic downturn behind the dismal opportunities I'm facing, but it looks like planners don't have it much better. :-c
See your location and this thread.

This thread probably wouldn't have been started if it wasn't for that $30K planning director position for the City of East Cleveland.
 

TerraSapient

Cyburbian
Messages
2,588
Points
17
New contestant!

I have a new entry into the worst paid planning jobs on record:

Job Category Economic Planning and Development
Job Level Senior (8-10 years)
Salary Range $20,000 - $25,000
AICP Certification Desirable

Location: New Orleans, LA
Company: Perez
 

kalimotxo

Cyburbian
Messages
412
Points
13
I have a new entry into the worst paid planning jobs on record:

Job Category Economic Planning and Development
Job Level Senior (8-10 years)
Salary Range $20,000 - $25,000
AICP Certification Desirable

Location: New Orleans, LA
Company: Perez
I saw that one and was also shocked, but you missed this part:
This job will run for approximately 75 days.
Not too shabby when you take that into consideration...
 

Dan

Dear Leader
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
18,696
Points
69
Okay, I think we have a new winner. Posted on the Indiana APA Web site: Greenfield Main Street Manager. Here's the "essential job functions"

1. Manage the Main Street program utilizing the Main Street 4 Point Approach.
2. Provide support to Downtown merchants.
3. Provide support to the Chamber of Commerce staff as needed.
4. Manage grant applications and grant administration for related projects.
5. Coordinate activities of the Main Street program, ensuring that communication between committees is well established; assist the committees with implementation of work plan items. Attend all GMSI functions and meetings as necessary.
6. Manage all administrative aspects of the Main Street program, including preparation of all reports required by the Indiana Main Street Program and other state and federal agencies, maintaining databases, and handling communication.
7. Prepare monthly e-newsletters, update/manage GMSI website and social networking sites to keep the Main Street Program highly visible in the community.
8. Create and maintain a building database.
9. Assist the board with developing sources of funding to perpetuate the position and the program via the identification of corporate and local sponsors; increase GMSI membership and establish levels of membership to sustain program.
Required experience:

Applicant will at minimum hold a Bachelors degree from an accredited four-year college or university. A degree in Nonprofit or Public Administration, Urban Planning, Historic Preservation, Business Development or a related field is preferred.

Experience in downtown development, local government administration or other relevant training, education or experience is also a plus.
Part time, but 20-30 hours week plus weekends and evenings (which will probably add up to 40 hours a week)

$20,000 non-negotiable with no benefits. Not a typo. $20,000. $12.82 an hour, if they do indeed work 30 hours a week, or $9.62 an hour if they get stuck working 40 hour weeks. For comparison, the current U.S. federal minimum wage is $7.25. We're looking at a late-1980s middle-of-nowhere entry level salary for a job in 2010, not adjusted for inflation, and with no benefits such as health insurance.
 

Bubba

Cyburbian
Messages
5,387
Points
37
Okay, I think we have a new winner. Posted on the Indiana APA Web site: Greenfield Main Street Manager.

$20,000 non-negotiable with no benefits. Not a typo. $20,000. $12.82 an hour, if they do indeed work 30 hours a week, or $9.62 an hour if they get stuck working 40 hour weeks. For comparison, the current U.S. federal minimum wage is $7.25. We're looking at a late-1980s middle-of-nowhere entry level salary for a job in 2010, not adjusted for inflation, and with no benefits such as health insurance.
Meh - not out of the ordinary for Main Street Manager jobs. Plus, historic preservation related non-profits just don't pay well at all...it's hardly late-1980s type stuff.
 
Messages
207
Points
9
I once interviewed for a Main Street / Downtown Development director position that paid between $40,000 and $50,000 and had no benefits. Is the 'no benefits' thing typical for Main Street jobs?
 

azmodela

Cyburbian
Messages
97
Points
4
$20,000 non-negotiable with no benefits. Not a typo. $20,000. $12.82 an hour, if they do indeed work 30 hours a week, or $9.62 an hour if they get stuck working 40 hour weeks. For comparison, the current U.S. federal minimum wage is $7.25. We're looking at a late-1980s middle-of-nowhere entry level salary for a job in 2010, not adjusted for inflation, and with no benefits such as health insurance.

It's a paycheck, right?
 

Dan

Dear Leader
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
18,696
Points
69
It's a paycheck, right?
So's McDonald's and Burger King, only you don't need specialized education and skills that involve tens of thousands of dollars of higher education to acquire.
 

PrahaSMC

Cyburbian
Messages
128
Points
6
So's McDonald's and Burger King, only you don't need specialized education and skills that involve tens of thousands of dollars of higher education to acquire.
Ultimately, I guess this just comes back to the old saying "don't hate the player, hate the game."

I'd kill for almost any of these salaries. It makes me wonder, is there any master's degree you can acquire with a bleaker outlook? People ask me all the time what I went to school for and when I tell them, they usually respond "Hm, that's interesting" or "Oh, that seems like a timely profession, with the stimulus and all." I used to play nice and just nod, but I'm at the point where I'm telling people, "No actually, my career prospects are non-existent and my options appear to be Peace Corps, military, or fast food." Really, I feel like a walking caricature of Red from Shawshank, when he goes up before the parole board-- just completely deflated. When I started college it never so much as crossed my mind that I wouldn't be successful. Hell, even when I started grad school in '06 I felt like the options were limitless... little did I know I actually made myself less competitive and ultimately less confident by getting a master's degree. Two years of school, 15 months volunteering... ugh. I work alongside optimistic, forward-thinking people and, in theory, that should be a pick-me-up. But really, just seeing all these people with good, stable careers makes me seethe with jealously. It's all I think about: What did I do wrong? What can I do to turn things around? Am I being overly dramatic?

[/end rant]
 

stroskey

Cyburbian
Messages
1,212
Points
17
For me, the more I studied land use planning the more interested I became in the human element of it all.Planning goes right along with sociology in terms of why people live where they do, how to build better communities, and what has shaped us as humans in our culture. Are there any jobs out there in sociological fields such as community development, teaching at a community college, etc?
 

azmodela

Cyburbian
Messages
97
Points
4
So's McDonald's and Burger King, only you don't need specialized education and skills that involve tens of thousands of dollars of higher education to acquire.
I would argue that the education isn't terribly specialized, but this job will be filled. I'm sure that the hiring authority expects it to be a position that will have a high turn over because of the salary. It could also be filled by someone returning to the workforce, and doesn't want a full time job or benefits.

It's supply vs demand. Right now one is in short supply while the other is in big supply. This isn't the time for the profession to complain about salaries.
 

Hink

OH....IO
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
15,814
Points
51
It makes me wonder, is there any master's degree you can acquire with a bleaker outlook?
How about I one up you... get a JD. Good luck finding a job. I would guess that there are TONS of specialties out there that require a master's and are MUCH worse off than planning. At least we have government positions in our field, which means some will exist. What about the jobs where a master's is preferred and the field is just not growing enough to support the jobs (architects?). Our field is like many others... the economy just sucks right now. :-@

This isn't the time for the profession to complain about salaries.
I would argue that it is always a time to complain about salaries. If the economy is bad, then there are less jobs. I am sure your argument is that at least there are some jobs available. And I agree with that. But for a profession to allow itself to be taken down a notch, hurts it much more in the long run. If an argument can be made that a planner out of grad school is now worth $32k a year instead of $35k a year. That isn't going to just change when the economy gets better. APA is trying to make our profession much more marketable and professional with AICP and their requirements. But if APA doesn't start advocating for actual planners, hiring practices, and costs of our profession, we will just get continue our slow decline.
 

PrahaSMC

Cyburbian
Messages
128
Points
6
How about I one up you... get a JD. Good luck finding a job. I would guess that there are TONS of specialties out there that require a master's and are MUCH worse off than planning. At least we have government positions in our field, which means some will exist. What about the jobs where a master's is preferred and the field is just not growing enough to support the jobs (architects?). Our field is like many others... the economy just sucks right now. :-@
I tend to believe the opposite. At least when the macro-economy does grow, there will be private sector opportunities. State and municipal governments are still in extremely dire circumstances right now... many municipalities in my home state have mandatory wage freezes and are still laying people off. The budgets are getting slashed all over the place.

Not to mention, the backlash against "big government" is here to stay. Even President Obama is pandering to this slice of the electorate with his spending freeze rhetoric. IMO, it is increasingly likely that we are going to have a conservative President in three years and the spending cuts will continue. Honestly, the fact that my employment is largely dependent on government is something that makes me feel less confident about the future, not more so.
 

Dan

Dear Leader
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
18,696
Points
69
How about $50,000 for a director-level job requiring a minimum of ten years of experience? (Executive Director, Richland County Regional Planning Commission, Mansfield, OH) Even the high end of the salary range ($69,000) is kind of low considering the experience required, but we know that with most jobs, the starting salary is usually between the bottom and middle end of the range.

"There's going to be someone desperate enough to take it." Maybe, but consider that it's a small metropolitan area; whoever takes it is going likely going to be someone outside of the region. Mansfield/Richland County is a very depressed area, so it would take a lot for someone to be enticed to move there for what could be several years or the remainder of their career. Housing may be cheap, but it's cheap for a reason.

I agree with Hink_Planner regarding the APA -- and I'll add the broader planning community -- and its collective inaction regarding planning salaries. Teachers' unions and police benevolent societies have been relatively successful at efforts to boost salaries for the professions they represent. Around here, teachers and police officers have salaries 50% more, if not higher, than planners with an equivalent amount of experience. (Salaries for the Town of Amherst, New York; .pdf) Even with six-digit salaries being commonplace, "Pay Police Like Your Life Depended On It" bumper stickers are still a frequent sight around here. What have we done to promote the financial benefits of good planning?

I'd really like to see a comparison of old APA JobMart ads from the 1980s, and APA online job listings now, and see how salaries have fared adjusted for inflation.
 

arcplans

As Featured in "High Times"
Messages
6,656
Points
32
But really, just seeing all these people with good, stable careers makes me seethe with jealously. It's all I think about: What did I do wrong? What can I do to turn things around? Am I being overly dramatic?
Seriously, you are not the only one looking for a job. Many other planners, hell many other people are looking for job. Like HP said It's the economy stupid. Do i feel for you: yes, because i too graduated at the tail end of the 2001 recession, but i did find a job in less desirable area and i took it. Your posts make it seem like just because your got your fancy grad degree that you are entitled to a job but just like many in our generation, you are not. Like my old man said, you have to work hard at it, even doing the $hit you don't want to do to get you where you want to be in life. And the chips are down, rather than just whining, being a jealous guy of others, you just need to learn that maybe planning isn't "right now" but rather find ways to be marketable.

Why do i use marketable? Well i was speaking with a client when he asked me point blank what I would do if i got laid off? I told him go to grad school. He then told me that would make me even more marketable in the public sector because now i would couple that with the experience I have gained working as a planner. He even pointed out that it is ridiculous that an agency would pass me up and if his agency was hiring, he would definitely want me on, but that little degree opens up new doors that are immediately shut simply because of the tag line master degree preferred. Yea, it sucks, and I have vent my frustration on this board, I still pick myself up each morning to work. Have you thought about doing something to utilize the skills you have gained outside of planning? We have had this discussion on another thread. So check that out.

I don't feel sorry for you. I feel bad for folks like medelman whom have been laid off, family to support, mortgage to be paid and it seems like a layoff came out of nowhere. I feel for him. Staying positive is a good thing, learn it and go make yourself "marketable" if you truly want to be in this profession. If not, be content with something else for a while. It could be worse. You could be homeless, off fighting a war, etc.

IMO, it is increasingly likely that we are going to have a conservative President in three years and the spending cuts will continue. Honestly, the fact that my employment is largely dependent on government is something that makes me feel less confident about the future, not more so.
And no i doesn't. There is the private sector that severs private clients. The federal government plays a role, but not to the largest extent that planning jobs are going to disappear due do lack of funding from the feds. It's your state and munis that you need to worry about. Not some presidential election to take place 2 years from now.

Sorry if i sound harsh, I have just grown cold to the 1 or 5 post people that come on this board asking for job help and just leave. It's like the chick you buy a drink for. You just expect something but usually you end up with nothing. (unless your my friend mark, he is just a manwhore :D)

Good luck.
 

PrahaSMC

Cyburbian
Messages
128
Points
6
Seriously, you are not the only one looking for a job. Many other planners, hell many other people are looking for job. Like HP said It's the economy stupid. Do i feel for you: yes, because i too graduated at the tail end of the 2001 recession, but i did find a job in less desirable area and i took it. Your posts make it seem like just because your got your fancy grad degree that you are entitled to a job but just like many in our generation, you are not. Like my old man said, you have to work hard at it, even doing the $hit you don't want to do to get you where you want to be in life. And the chips are down, rather than just whining, being a jealous guy of others, you just need to learn that maybe planning isn't "right now" but rather find ways to be marketable.
I'm sorry if I have misconstrued the purpose of some of these forums, but I was under the impression that it was appropriate to vent frustrations without being judged or accused of whining. In fact, I think there are entire threads devoted to exactly this.

Furthermore, are you seriously accusing me of feeling entitled? You appropriately found a job after finishing your bachelor's, but naturally someone like myself with a master’s degree that has volunteered full-time for over a year is a spoiled, entitled brat when they feel discouraged by their job outlook… At what point will I have paid my dues in your mind? Working for free for two years? Five? Ten? A PhD? Be sure to let me know. My “fancy grad degree” was acquired through a lot of hard-work, after I supported myself through college. Job opportunities come as a result hard-work, luck, and opportunity. I appreciate the “pick yourself up by the bootstraps” speech, but I can do without the anecdotes from your father or the condescending attitude. Just because you’ve assumed—on the basis of a few lines posted on a message board— that a person fits neatly into a category of “entitled” young planners who think their shiny degree should lead to easystreet, doesn’t make you some omniscient sage.
 

Dan

Dear Leader
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
18,696
Points
69
Another sub-$30K job in Indiana was just posted on the APA National site. Columbus, Indiana.

Job Category Land-Use Management and Code Enforcement
Job Level Entry (0–1 year)
Salary Range $28,441 to $38,250 DOQ
AICP Certification Not Required

What's the deal with the low planning salaries in the Hoosier State?
 

The One

Cyburbian
Messages
8,289
Points
30
HA!

Another sub-$30K job in Indiana was just posted on the APA National site. Columbus, Indiana.

Job Category Land-Use Management and Code Enforcement
Job Level Entry (0–1 year)
Salary Range $28,441 to $38,250 DOQ
AICP Certification Not Required

What's the deal with the low planning salaries in the Hoosier State?
Almost as bad as the state of Maine.....:not:
 

jdplanner

Cyburbian
Messages
40
Points
2
Wow... I found one that pays just over minimum wage right outside the Charleston area in SC

Lincolnville, SC

ZONING ADMINISTRATOR/CODE ENFORCEM
Salary Range $8.50 to $9.50

Job Description:Will provide Code Enforcement related to Health, Sanitation and Property Maintenance as provided by the Town Ordinances; Interpret the town Zoning Ordinances, and devlopment zoning regulations; Administer Zoning Permits and Certificates; Process all appeals to the Zoning Board ; Investigate and resolve complaints pertaining to the ordinances

Created February 17, 2010
Last Updated February 18, 2010
Job Order ID Number 403732
Salary Range $8.50 to $9.50 Job Location Lincolnville, SC 29485
Type of Employment Regular, Part-time
Shift Day
Other Shift Schedules Flexible scheduling is available, must be willing/able to work some evenings, with daytime schedules to be determined. At present, will work approximately 15-20 hours per week.
Hours per Week 10-19
Overtime Available No
Overtime Mandatory No
Available 02/17/2010
Education Required High School Diploma or Equivalent
Experience Required Less than 1 Year
 

jdplanner

Cyburbian
Messages
40
Points
2
It also only requires a high school diploma
Very true, and I wouldn't expect it to be a high paying job. However, I made more than that washing cars my freshmen year of college. So, I was kind of shocked at the pay.

It is also only a part time job. So, maybe a college student interested in planning could fill it and get some experience. So in that light, maybe it's not so bad.
 

Dan

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Still, the job involves some complicated work, fairly advanced skills, and likely a lot of frustration considering it's code enforcement. It's basically Planner I zoning administration work.

I think we may have a new winner, or loser as the case may be.
 

Wankshaft

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I dunno....saw one on the APA site today. Maybe not lowest-paying planning position....but certainly thee largest disparity [salary vs. cost-of-living] planning position:

Planner or Senior Planner
Islamorada, Village of Islands
Islamorada, FL



Job Category Community Development and Redevelopment
Job Level Mid I (1-4 years)
Salary Range $41,000+ - $45,000+ DOQ
AICP Certification Desirable



Islamorada, Florida....right smack-dab in the middle of The Keys, so literally almost NO rental apartments other than for a weekly vacation rental basis (at $800 per week rent), and housing purchases (non-beachfront at about 1000 sq. ft.) start at around $600,000.

Dan - Amherst link broken......but I grew up in Eggertsville....and I know that the trash guy prolly makes more than a Government Urban Planner does in Western New York, sooo......
 

Dan

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Planner or Senior Planner
Islamorada, Village of Islands
Islamorada, FL



Job Category Community Development and Redevelopment
Job Level Mid I (1-4 years)
Salary Range $41,000+ - $45,000+ DOQ
AICP Certification Desirable
Jobs in Florida all seem to pay about the same amount for the level, no matter where in the state the job is located. Salaries didn't rise with the housing boom of the 2000s,and the corresponding increase in housing prices. Maybe RichmondJake can confirm this; there could be exceptions.

Jobs for the City of New York are also quite low considering the cost of living; entry level in the low $40s, mid-level planners in the $50s. I know it's possible to live in NYC on $40K if you ditched the car and lived in a small apartment in an outer borough, but it's not much of a life.

Meanwhile, I think I just found a new winner that beats the minimum-wage zoning administrator job. Try this job in NYC

ARCHIVE is recruiting for an interim regional manager to lead its operations from its New York office over the next 6 months. Our NY office will be helping to lead/coordinate project intervention efforts in both Haiti and West Africa, as well as direct small community initiatives in the US.

Ideal candidate will be a self-starter and someone with superior organizational management skills. This is ideal for someone with experience and/or interest in international development, non-profit management, architecture, public health, urban planning, poverty alleviation or business administration.

Responsibilities include, making presentations to corporate partners, managing teams of interns, relationship management, event planning, project scheduling and overall office management.
Salary? None. Zero. Nada.
 

MacheteJames

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Jobs for the City of New York are also quite low considering the cost of living; entry level in the low $40s, mid-level planners in the $50s. I know it's possible to live in NYC on $40K if you ditched the car and lived in a small apartment in an outer borough, but it's not much of a life.

Meanwhile, I think I just found a new winner that beats the minimum-wage zoning administrator job. Try this job in NYC



Salary? None. Zero. Nada.
It's actually not that bad, I make high $40s, live in a pretty nice hood in the outer boroughs and have a car. I work outside of the city, however. It's doable, but pretty hard to save any money at the end of the month. My place is small and I definitely won't be living in it 10 years from now, but for now, it's not bad. I would not take another job that paid less than $60k, which is hard to find outside of the private sector.
 

beach_bum

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I dunno....saw one on the APA site today. Maybe not lowest-paying planning position....but certainly thee largest disparity [salary vs. cost-of-living] planning position:

Planner or Senior Planner
Islamorada, Village of Islands
Islamorada, FL



Job Category Community Development and Redevelopment
Job Level Mid I (1-4 years)
Salary Range $41,000+ - $45,000+ DOQ
AICP Certification Desirable



Islamorada, Florida....right smack-dab in the middle of The Keys, so literally almost NO rental apartments other than for a weekly vacation rental basis (at $800 per week rent), and housing purchases (non-beachfront at about 1000 sq. ft.) start at around $600,000.
This is pretty typical for the Keys (or Monroe County, FL) , which is why you will often see jobs posted down there. Its a beautiful place to visit, but its expensive to live there. The pay is on target for what entry-mid level planners make in FL. The Keys have alot of planning/environmental problems along with several state-protected areas...which make for a very challenging job!
 

Richmond Jake

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Here's my take

Jobs in Florida all seem to pay about the same amount for the level, no matter where in the state the job is located. Salaries didn't rise with the housing boom of the 2000s,and the corresponding increase in housing prices. Maybe RichmondJake can confirm this; there could be exceptions......
In my 5-1/2 years of experience here, there is actually a wide variation. For instance, Seminole County last year hired a new planning director. As I recall, the posted salary was very competitive. Collier County is another example. They pay very well, but I've heard the work environment is not to be desired. My sense is, metro areas pay significantly more than their rural counterparts. As they should due to the higher cost of living.

Monroe County is a different story, as beach-bum points out. How they keep anybody there with those salaries is a mystery to me. I guess that's the reason they seem to advertise frequently.

And remember: there's no state income tax in Florida.
 
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