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Magic Johnson's Urban Businesses

nerudite

Cyburbian
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I know, this is an espn.com article, so it may not have as much planning street cred, but it's a good example of what one person can do for their community. I think this is aimed toward athletes bringing back to their neighborhoods, but it's a good message for corporate america and individual developers/planners as well.

Magic's Kingdom (espn.com/MSN link).
 

SGB

Cyburbian
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I've neven been a pro basketball fan, but I've always admired Magic.

His Starbucks inverstment aside |-) , I've just gotta say:

Go Magic, go!

Imagine the potential for urban revatalization if many other professional athletes follow his example.

Now, I just gotta find some rich athletes from my rural county. :-\
 
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As one of 10 children who grew up in a depressed area of Lansing, Mich., Johnson knew how to do that. His Starbucks stores offer a variety of ethnic favorites, including cobblers and pies. The menus at his TGI Friday's in Los Angeles and Atlanta have more fried foods than the restaurant chain's other franchises around the country.

Gee Magic. Thanks for encouraging the "ethnic" folks to eat more fried foods. It's just what they need - increased chances for hypertension, heart attacks and strokes. ^o)

Other than that, I think he's doing a commendable job. A few former Saints players have become developers in the city and one was even a state representative for a few years.
 
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Gee Magic. Thanks for encouraging the "ethnic" folks to eat more fried foods. It's just what they need - increased chances for hypertension, heart attacks and strokes.

Other than that, I think he's doing a commendable job. A few former Saints players have become developers in the city and one was even a state representative for a few years.

whoa, I never thought about it that way, bad that's pretty bad when you really think about it. Anyway, I think he's doing a great job at reinvesting in low income inner city neighborhoods. He even tried to build one of his theatres in one of the rough neighborhoods (Gateway Mall) in Jacksonville a couple of years ago. Unfortunately, the deal fell through.
 

pete-rock

Cyburbian
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Magic is a major partner in a new development here in Chicago called State Place. It's in the South Loop and on the site of the old Police Dept. headquarters. I know it's supposed to be a mixed-use development with a variety of housing types (high-rise, mid-rise, townhouses). I don't know who the retailers are going to be yet.

I think it's great that Magic has turned his basketball millions into real redevelopment in cities. You know, the real big money in sports started flowing in 20-25 years ago; I wouldn't be surprised if more and more athletes morph into developers and other entrepreneurs in the next decade.
 

Big Easy King

Cyburbian
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A business venture or two from Magic was slated for New Orleans since 1999/2000. There was talk of movie theaters and another venture...nothing yet.
 

pete-rock

Cyburbian
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Big Easy King said:
A business venture or two from Magic was slated for New Orleans since 1999/2000. There was talk of movie theaters and another venture...nothing yet.

I found a link to Magic's State Place here in Chicago.

I've heard there's been lots of fits and starts with Magic's projects throughout the country, but that may be more due to the nature of the development business than anything.
 

Bangorian

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Quote:
As one of 10 children who grew up in a depressed area of Lansing, Mich., Johnson knew how to do that. His Starbucks stores offer a variety of ethnic favorites, including cobblers and pies. The menus at his TGI Friday's in Los Angeles and Atlanta have more fried foods than the restaurant chain's other franchises around the country.


Has he done anything in Lansing? Goodness knows downtown Lansing could use some investment (especially south Washington St. and most of the south-central neighborhoods)!
 

New2daGame

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What Magic Johnson is doing is to be commended. I wish more athletes, entertainers and other black millionaires would do the same. So many of them get their contracts for millions, move to some far flung exclusive suburban enclave and never look back to the 'hood that produced them except to do a camp or some other public appearance. They let their agents sign them up for random charities they know nothing about.

Well, the 'hood doesn't need more camps or charities. The 'hood needs some economic development. It needs these new millionaires to reinvest in the "old neighborhood", bring jobs, housing and other amenities to their neighborhoods where most developers wouldn't go, and invest in the entrepreneurial ventures of other blacks of lesser means.

I'll get off my soapbox now :-D
 
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I agree with New2DaGame whole heartedly. Last fall, I had the pleasure of meeting Mr. Johnson here in Baltimore. I have more respect for him after he retired from basketball than I did when he was playing. I was recently in LA, and I saw the fruits of his efforts. The movie theater on Crenshaw was packed. His Friday's restaurant on La Cienega was packed as well as his Starbucks at that particular location. Just think how much cash Jordan could generate other than making sure the local FootLocker is well stocked with his sneakers. I just think it's a win-win situation. Money could flow through the black community and stay a little while and they could still make a profit which is the bottom line.
 
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New2daGame said:
What Magic Johnson is doing is to be commended. I wish more athletes, entertainers and other black millionaires would do the same. So many of them get their contracts for millions, move to some far flung exclusive suburban enclave and never look back to the 'hood that produced them except to do a camp or some other public appearance. They let their agents sign them up for random charities they know nothing about.

Well, the 'hood doesn't need more camps or charities. The 'hood needs some economic development. It needs these new millionaires to reinvest in the "old neighborhood", bring jobs, housing and other amenities to their neighborhoods where most developers wouldn't go, and invest in the entrepreneurial ventures of other blacks of lesser means.

I'll get off my soapbox now :-D

We've had a similar discussion about this subject in the past.

http://www.cyburbia.org/forums/showthread.php?t=7216&highlight=giving+back+community


My question is this - why is it that only African American entertainers are expected to give back to the community or da hood? Are the people of Detroit demanding that Eminem reinvest back into the city? Is J.Ho., aka Jenny from the block, opening one of her restaurants in south side Bronx?

I'm not suggesting that these entertainers don't contribute or give back in some way, shape or form, but the pressure or emphasis to do so always seems to be placed on African Americans.

BTW, "PSSSSSSSSSS" from one former RATTLER to another! :-D
 

GeogPlanner

Cyburbian
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I think it's interesting that the Starbuck's are "Magic's" because Starbucks does not franchise. The closest thing to it is offering Starbucks coffee in a hotel or something. Anyway, I can appreciate what Magic has done, but I too an concerned for the abundance of "fried food" at locations. It's a great community development story, but don't poor communities have enough poor food choices?

From our Starbuck's friend's site, http://www.starbuckseverywhere.net:


This store, opened in partnership with Magic Johnson, was a hot spot for chess when I arrived, with at least three or four games in progress.


Another unmarked UCO store. The store locator used to include "UCO" in the name of the stores opened with Magic Johnson's involvement, but lately they've stopped this practice. Another thing I've noticed is that many of the new stores, like this one, have rounded facades.


It's spelled "El Segundo", guys--as in, "I Left My Wallet in El Segundo". Anyhow, this is one of the stores opened in partnership with Magic Johnson.


And yet another Magic store.
 

New2daGame

Member
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Planderella said:
We've had a similar discussion about this subject in the past.

http://www.cyburbia.org/forums/showthread.php?t=7216&highlight=giving+back+community


My question is this - why is it that only African American entertainers are expected to give back to the community or da hood? Are the people of Detroit demanding that Eminem reinvest back into the city? Is J.Ho., aka Jenny from the block, opening one of her restaurants in south side Bronx?

I'm not suggesting that these entertainers don't contribute or give back in some way, shape or form, but the pressure or emphasis to do so always seems to be placed on African Americans.

BTW, "PSSSSSSSSSS" from one former RATTLER to another! :-D

PSSSSSSSSSSS right back atcha, fam. :-D

I agree that Eminem and J. Lo have profitted off the 'hood, and should feel compelled to invest back into the communities that have made them who and what they are. However, I think our black athletes and entertainers, as well as other millionaires, should feel an even greater responsibility to the 'hood, whether raised there or not. It's something called "collective responsibility". I like Eminem and J. Lo. But, at the end of the day, Eminem is a white man, and J. Lo is a Hispanic woman. My expectations of them in terms of investing in poor black communities is lower than that of blacks of similar status.
 
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New2daGame said:
PSSSSSSSSSSS right back atcha, fam. :-D

I agree that Eminem and J. Lo have profitted off the 'hood, and should feel compelled to invest back into the communities that have made them who and what they are. However, I think our black athletes and entertainers, as well as other millionaires, should feel an even greater responsibility to the 'hood, whether raised there or not. It's something called "collective responsibility". I like Eminem and J. Lo. But, at the end of the day, Eminem is a white man, and J. Lo is a Hispanic woman. My expectations of them in terms of investing in poor black communities is lower than that of blacks of similar status.

PSSSSSSSS, add another Rattler to the list. I graduated from FAMU in 2001 with a Bachelor of Architecture degree.
 

New2daGame

Member
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18
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lakelander said:
PSSSSSSSS, add another Rattler to the list. I graduated from FAMU in 2001 with a Bachelor of Architecture degree.

Say, what? We might know each other.

BTW, are you the same "Lakelander" on SkycraperCity, SkyscraperPage, and UrbanPlanet? I'm Jahi98 on those forums.
 
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New2daGame said:
Say, what? We might know each other.

BTW, are you the same "Lakelander" on SkycraperCity, SkyscraperPage, and UrbanPlanet? I'm Jahi98 on those forums.

Yeah that's me. I was at SOA from 1996 - 2001. When I graduated from FAMU I took an architectural job in Lakeland. After two years there, I made the move to Jacksonville. I just ran into Andrew Chin a couple of weeks ago, while I was visiting Tally.
 
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