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Make your own from scratch

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#1
There was a moment in time when everything was made from scratch. If you wanted bread, you started with a bag of flower, which you may or may not have milled yourself. But those days are nothing more than a distant memory for almost everything. Yesterday I purchased the ingredients to make my own buffalo sauce and my own hot sauce. Sure I can buy a bottle, but none of them have the flavor and heat that I want.

However, are there particular items that you make yourself? This could be anything from pickles too smoked sausages to full meals. And not just food related, but also other things including clothing, candles, and such.

Are there particular items that you might buy from a 'maker' that does not mass produce their products?
 

Maister

Chairman of the bored
Staff member
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#2
cooking would be my most common response. Cooking at home allows one ultimate control over ingredient quality, portion sizes, and flavors.
I've also been known to brew my own beer and grow my own vegetables. I'll occasionally tap myself as a writer of radio scripts, even though I have other authors available to me.
 

gtpeach

Cyburbian
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#3
I make my own pasta from scratch on occasion. Usually when I'm making a fancy pasta dish and want to kick it up that extra notch. :)
 

Michele Zone

     
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#4
Would this be a good place to joke that I made my own chef from scratch? ;) My sons took over the "women's work" when I had a corporate job. I will do vegetable prep and occasionally cook something just for me, but my oldest son took over the cooking and most of the grocery shopping.

He's a better cook than I am in terms of turning out a high quality product, though he won't even try to do a traditional meat-and-potatoes-and-fresh-bread-and-two-veggies kind of meal. He does a lot of one pot stuff. He likes to keep it simple, but it's tastier than most of the meals I ever produced.
 

kms

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#5
I baked our bread during the time I stayed home with my kids. I seldom eat croissants, but I’ll bake my own. If I decide I want pasta for dinner but have none in the pantry, I’ll make my own. I’ll smoke pork, chicken and tasso before I buy it. I can make ricotta in less time than it takes to drive to the store and buy it. I’ve made and canned preserves.

Yet, last weekend I thought I’d like to serve French fries for dinner but didn’t feel like fussing with potatoes, so I ordered some from a place in town. They were ready by the time I walked to pick them up.

I’m fascinated with the skill and tradition of making food items at home.
 

kjel

Super Moderator
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#6
Over the years I've made a lot of things from scratch. I consider myself to be an accomplished and versatile cook.

When I lived closer to farms I routinely canned jams, fruits, vegetables, and pickles. I can bake pretty much anything from scratch, since I eat mostly low carb I don't bake as regularly as I used to since I can't eat it. Generally I buy bread but we have high quality inexpensive bakeries all around so it's not that I'm missing out.

My main hobby is hand stitching quilts using the English Paper Piecing method. It's slow and methodical but that's intentional. I don't own a sewing machine now but I do know how to sew basic things. Veloise is the expert sewer here.

Funny story about french fries. Bella wanted some and I wasn't going to go out to get her some so I sliced up a potato and fried them up for her. She said "wow, my mind is blown and these are delicious!" She might turn out to be my cook because her older sister does not like to cook even though she's capable of turning out a decent meal. Bella always wants to see what I am doing and how I am cooking something. She won't ask for an egg, she'll ask for it flat and golden crispy (fried hard in butter), fluffy yellow (scrambled), or white (hard boiled egg).
 
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#7
I've recently been diagnosed with some pretty severe food allergies that, come to find out, are impacting way more than just food. Not only can I not eat ANY food that comes in a box or bag or ANY food that was fed anything that comes in a box or bag (it's lovely), I've also discovered that almost everything in my house had to go -- lotion, deodorant, shampoo, soap -- it was causing some pretty intense reactions.

What does that mean in relation to this thread? It means that I have to do a crap-ton of research to find someone that makes specialty items without my allergen or I have to buy specialty ingredients and make things myself. Slowly, I'm learning (and consequently, 6 months in, starting to feel better).

If it wasn't so darn annoying, it might be kind of fun actually. I have to be able to talk to the maker of all my products now in order to ensure it's safe for me. Basically everything is local and/or handmade.

Examples of fantastic new handmade products in my life: activated charcoal toothpaste (makes my teeth whiter), hamburger rolls (made from scratch weekly they are AWESOME!), flour tortillas (a billion times better than store-bought). My diet is also amazingly healthy now even though I spend a lot more time on meal prep and a lot more money on food.
 

Michele Zone

     
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#8
I've recently been diagnosed with some pretty severe food allergies that, come to find out, are impacting way more than just food. Not only can I not eat ANY food that comes in a box or bag or ANY food that was fed anything that comes in a box or bag (it's lovely), I've also discovered that almost everything in my house had to go -- lotion, deodorant, shampoo, soap -- it was causing some pretty intense reactions.

What does that mean in relation to this thread? It means that I have to do a crap-ton of research to find someone that makes specialty items without my allergen or I have to buy specialty ingredients and make things myself. Slowly, I'm learning (and consequently, 6 months in, starting to feel better).

If it wasn't so darn annoying, it might be kind of fun actually. I have to be able to talk to the maker of all my products now in order to ensure it's safe for me. Basically everything is local and/or handmade.

Examples of fantastic new handmade products in my life: activated charcoal toothpaste (makes my teeth whiter), hamburger rolls (made from scratch weekly they are AWESOME!), flour tortillas (a billion times better than store-bought). My diet is also amazingly healthy now even though I spend a lot more time on meal prep and a lot more money on food.
For a different reason, I resemble this remark -- or did at one time. I'm many years down the road from when I was reading all labels, all the time and looking for alternatives that didn't trigger some nasty reaction and generally being creative.

I'm at a point where it's a little like being a Kosher Jew: I can have a full life and I don't have to be sick all the time, so long as I stick to the dietary and lifestyle restrictions that work for me.

My quality of life is the best it has ever been, far better than I ever expected to see. Over time, the body was able to do a lot of repair work once the environmental stressors were removed.

We went through periods where we made homemade flat bread, homemade yeast-free pizza crust, homemade cake from scratch (not a mix) etc. I don't currently have a kitchen, so we can't do that stuff now, but my oldest son can't wait until we do have a bigger place and can cook again. He's sick of eating takeout.
 
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#9
I’m big into this. From scratch I routinely make my own bread and pizza dough, pizza sauce, chicken broth, refried beans (I eat a lot of refried beans!). I used to make my own beer from scratch but I drink a lot less beer now. Every year I make a hot sauce with the fruits and hot peppers that I grow in the yard, and I make more than enough to last for the whole year.
 

Bubba

Cyburbian
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#10
Every year I make a hot sauce with the fruits and hot peppers that I grow in the yard, and I make more than enough to last for the whole year.
I alternate between pickling the peppers and making hot sauce (this year is trending more towards pickling), but, yeah, it generally lasts about a year.
 

dvdneal

Cyburbian
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#11
refried beans (I eat a lot of refried beans!).
So many easy jokes that I'll just skip this one.

My wife is the make it from scratch lady. I don't think I've had a frozen or premade dinner of any kind since I met her. We do pizza from scratch every Friday. Homemade flat bread (naan) when we do curry. There are only a few things she doesn't do like cake. The mix is just as good but faster. She will tweak it though. Add some coffee or cloves to chocolate. Use sour cream in the mix. It all confuses me, but she knows what she's doing and it tastes good.
 
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