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Mass Transportation in Japan

Quail64

Cyburbian
Messages
55
Points
4
The transportation system in Japan is wonderful. You can take a train just about anywhere. If the train won't take you there, a bus will. In my time over there, I never had any trouble getting around because of this system and how well it works.

There were 3 major railway companies around where I lived. Hanku, Hanshin, and Japan Railways. Between the three of them, you could access anywhere.


This is one of many train stations in Osaka. Clean and efficient.


Train station in Nishinomiya (Spokane's sister city, and the town where I lived)


The trains.


Another train station/dept. store in Osaka.


A Hankyu train speeds by a pretty modern office building.


Osaka subway stop.


Kyoto train station.


A well-utilized train station I'd say. This is still in Kyoto.


This is a huge structure.


Osaka subway map. Got it all figured out yet?


One of the three company's Nishinomiya map.


Here are some of the tickets. Each destination has a different price, and you can either buy a one-way ticket at the ticket machine, or you can buy one of these. They have a set amount of money on them, and you just run them through the machines at your various destinations until the money runs out. It's very convenient.

You can visit my website to view more pictures of the area I was at. http://cale.pancakesanddreams.com/ Just click on the "Japan" link to your left. It's a beautiful country and and it boasts an excellent mass transit system.
 

Tranplanner

maudit anglais
Messages
7,918
Points
37
I've always wanted to go to Japan - even moreso now. Thanks for the pics, there are some really good ones on your website too.
 

Seabishop

Cyburbian
Messages
3,838
Points
25
The pics on your site are great. They're actually pics of everyday Japan complete with a little grittyness. You usually only see ultra-modern towers or ancient temples.

(I didn't want to listen to the music at work but maybe later) :)
 

BKM

Cyburbian
Messages
6,463
Points
29
Fantastic photos. The Japanese precision really comes through. I enjoy modern Japanese high-end architecture. There is a great art museum/cultural center in San Francisco designed by Fumihiko Maki (sp?) that is filled with light.

Seabishop: Not sure you would ever want to listen to music. They do everything else so well (my car is Japanese-American, electroncis, etc), but Japanese pop music is the world's worst :) :)
 

ludes98

Cyburbian
Messages
1,264
Points
22
Thanks for the pics! I wish we had transit like that, but until we have that kind of population/area ratio, I doubt it.
 

SlaveToTheGrind

Cyburbian
Messages
1,445
Points
27
My experience with the Japanese rail system was in Tokyo and on Hokkaido. My most memorable experience was using the restroom at the eki, or train station. While standing doing what guys do standing at the urinal, I could look over my shoulder and lean back just a bit and see all the people leaving the station. Kind of like have a crowd watch you do your business.:)
 

Seabishop

Cyburbian
Messages
3,838
Points
25
BKM said:
Seabishop: Not sure you would ever want to listen to music. They do everything else so well (my car is Japanese-American, electroncis, etc), but Japanese pop music is the world's worst :) :)
I meant Quail's own music on his website. You're probably right about the Japanese music.
 

jresta

Cyburbian
Messages
1,474
Points
23
ludes98 said:
Thanks for the pics! I wish we had transit like that, but until we have that kind of population/area ratio, I doubt it.
We do have transit like that, sort of. We have great places like Washington Union Station, Philadelphia 30th St., New York's Grand Central and other busy, but less grand stations like New York's Penn, Boston's South Station, Chicago's terminals, Philly's Suburban Station, etc.

The unfortunate part is that the trains, rails, and catenary that pass through them are neglected and are confined, for the most part, to 120mph.

If you take the Northeast Corridor - Boston to DC and it's branches to Harrisburg,PA, Albany,NY, Newport News, and Springfield, MA and include the emerging "high speed" corridors - The Keystone, the Empire, and the Southeast Corridor you have a network that stretches from Charlotte to Albany, Boston to Buffalo and Pittsburgh to Virginia Beach. The population of the metro areas it serves is just over 60 million people and covers some 60,000 square miles.

Japan by contrast is home to 127 million people and covers 235,000 square miles.

It's not that the northeast US isn't dense enough to attract that kind of rail ridership - it's that rail travel between Boston and Washington is the only place that is competitive with flying and the other corridors is only marginally faster than driving - the leg from Charlotte to Richmond is slower than driving.

Take out all the price competitiveness (compared to driving or flying) of the Japanese or European systems and there you have low american ridership.

People don't ride our trains because we funnel money to highways and airlines instead.
 
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