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Masters in Public Health

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13
Points
1
Over the past couple of weeks I have been debating on what to do after I graduate. One of the options that has been pointed out by one of my professors is getting a Masters in Public Health. There has been some talk that they are trying to get a joint degree program MUP/MPH. I know UNC and a few other schools already have this option. Any opinions???
 

el Guapo

Capitalist
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5,995
Points
31
You'd make more money in Kansas with a Masters in Interpretive Dance. Check out the salaries of County Health Department Heads and Senior Sanitarians at KDHE. There's your lifetime peak at $38,500. That may sound like a lot for a college student, but a MPH is dud degree - IMHO. Sorry to be blunt, but I know where for I speak. ;) You'd go futher in your career spending the $20-30K you'd spend on that degree on hookers and booze for your future bosses.
 
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13
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1
Well, I dont know how to reply to that, but thanks for the heads up on salaries. I definately dont plan on spending the rest of my life here in Kansas (Im getting the hell out of here ASAP).
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
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10,080
Points
34
What EG says holds true in the states (IL and WI) that I have worked in. An MPH is equivilent to a Masters in Social Work. You can make more money and spend less time in school if you just learn to say "Would you like fries with that?" OK, so money isn't everything, but is the MPH really going to help you much? Unless you are working in a large city, the specialization won't count for much. In fact, it could hurt if potential employers percieve you as more of a social planner than a physical planner. I don't mean to discourage you if this is your real interest, but you should know the facts going in.
 
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11
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1
When you say social planner as opposed to a physical planner are you refering to those who specialize in community development or economic development or something else? I am in a heavily policy oriented Urban Planning program. I always thought CD and ED are actually better to specialize in than physical planning. Than again it seems you were refering to the MPH program which is something else entirely. There is more money in Urban Planning than MPH I believe. Of course in a large city like Chicago there might be good opportunity with it.
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
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10,080
Points
34
Chicago said:
When you say social planner as opposed to a physical planner are you refering to those who specialize in community development or economic development or something else? I am in a heavily policy oriented Urban Planning program. I always thought CD and ED are actually better to specialize in than physical planning. Than again it seems you were refering to the MPH program which is something else entirely. There is more money in Urban Planning than MPH I believe. Of course in a large city like Chicago there might be good opportunity with it.
By social planning I do not mean economic development, and community development is a bit of a fuzzy term in most places, so I guess I'd stay away from that. When I say social planner I am thinking of someone who may be more in the line of (as in this case) public health planning, or other fields more closely related to social welfare rather than the built environment.
 
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Community Development is the most popular concentration in my program so they must be doing something right. I know there are lots of opportunities with it here in Chicago, I dont know about how it is percieved elsewhere.
 
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