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Me??? Grad School??? You tell me

michaelskis

Cyburbian
Messages
20,154
Points
51
I am thinking about going to Grad School now that I have the opportunity to get some, if not all of it paid for by my Employer. (Maybe) But, I am not sure where I should go, and the exact names of the programs. I would like something in Planning and Economic Development and Urban Design.

But here is the Clincher... I am still going to work full time, and I would like to drive no more than an hour and a half (one way) if possible. Does anyone from this area have any information on programs?
 

el Guapo

Capitalist
Messages
5,995
Points
31
michaelskis said:
I am thinking ....now that I have the opportunity to get some....paid for by my Employer. .... I am not sure.
Dude: Never turn down an opportunity to get some paid for by your employer.
 

Richmond Jake

You can't fight in here. This is the War Room!
Messages
18,313
Points
44
Planderella said:
Forget planning alltogether and get something more marketable like an MBA.
I agree. But if you're still interested in planning, try law school with emphysis in land use.
 

Jen

Cyburbian
Messages
1,704
Points
26
Lessee, does WMU have a grad level urban design planning dept? No, and their undergrad offerings are a little weak IMO in that dept too. What about K College? Davenport? Phoenix? No!Forget about planning urban design in grand Rapids too, not at GVSU, Aquinas, Calvin or Hope colleges.

Could you go to U of M?

How about an MPA right in K'zoo? OR a law degree, with WMU and GVSU are both hooked with east state law schools Cooley and and and that other one.
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
Messages
10,080
Points
34
michaelskis said:
But here is the Clincher... I am still going to work full time, and I would like to drive no more than an hour and a half (one way) if possible. Does anyone from this area have any information on programs?
Another option? My "housemate" lives a couple hours away. When he decided to go back for his masters while working full-time, I offered to let him stay at my place a couple nights a week. You might look for a hang-out where you get your degree, even if it is sharing an apartment with a real college student (especially if she is single, blond, works at Hooters, and just may have an interest in lesbians). I'd tell you the MBA isn't worth it, but his company is paying the whole thing, giving him flextime to do it, and giving him a promotion when he graduates. Oh, and he probably makes twice what I do. Still, he doesn't have the joy we experience in our daily lives as planners.
 

Chet

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
10,623
Points
34
Re: Re: Me??? Grad School??? You tell me

Cardinal said:
Oh, and he probably makes twice what I do. Still, he doesn't have the joy we experience in our daily lives as planners.
What is this joy you speak of?
 

JNA

Cyburbian Plus
Messages
25,771
Points
61
Many Apologies -
I just thought Michaelskis had been, so much for assuming.



Originally posted by Chet
Damn woman, you sure know how to beyotch slap! LOL ;)

now I am really confused!
 
Last edited:

Elisabeth

Cyburbian
Messages
157
Points
7
RichmondJake said:
if you're still interested in planning, try law school with emphasis in land use.
I've been exploring the option of doing a dual degree in planning and law. Does anyone have any insight into this option as far as the possibility of more (or less) career opportunities go? Thanks!
 
Messages
7,649
Points
29
USC's Sacramento Center has a 7 class Master's in Planning and Development Studies. It is a "weekend intensive" format where you go to class all day on the weekends, 2 or 3 times per semester, per class.

It is designed specifically for working professionals and many (most?) of the professors are also working in their field full-time and teaching part-time. When I have had had professor's who work full time and teach part time, they tend to be more understanding of the time constraints you are under and do not dump 100-page reading assignments on you at the last minute and crap like that, like some full-time proffessors occasionally do.

They also offer a couple of other Master's degrees, if you are interested in doing something else. They have students from as far away as Texas to the East of here and Taiwan to the West. I don't know why, but I was told that they seem to have quite a few students from Taiwan.

Three or four years ago, when I researched what kind of Master's programs are available for planning, this was the only one I found that was compatible with "distance learning". Since my husband is military, that was one of the things I was hoping to find. (Ironically, I now live 45 minutes away.)

The Sacramento Center

Alternately, USC has a Graduate level Certificate in GIS. It is only 3 classes and can be done completely over the internet or you can spend a week next summer on beautiful Catalina Island for rigorous Lab work as part of one of your 3 classes(wouldn't that be "hell"? lol).

GIS Certificate Program

I once tripped across a distance learning program on the East Coast at the Master's level for "economic development" or "community development" that had a similar format (as far as people flying in to be there on weekends). I don't remember the name and I no longer appear to have the URL. Sorry.
 

michaelskis

Cyburbian
Messages
20,154
Points
51
JNA said:
Many Apologies -
I just thought Michaelskis had been, so much for assuming.



Originally posted by Chet
Damn woman, you sure know how to beyotch slap! LOL ;)

now I am really confused!
I do not know if I should say thank you for thinking that I have been to grad school, or HEY what the…

Thank you for the ideas. Now I am going to look into what would be a good thing for me to take, based on the direction that I would like to go.
 

biscuit

Cyburbian
Messages
3,904
Points
25
Good luck to ya Mike. It's not easy to go back but it's one of those things that needs to be done for your long term career strategy.
The finacee is currently working on her MBA while working full time - Her BA in historic preservation and planning didn't work out the way she hoped. And I will most likely be going back next fall to get a MPA, if any school around here will have me. We should have no problem having a successful marriage if were both working full time and going to school because, after all, how will we ever argue if we never see each other.
 

Wannaplan?

Bounty Hunter
Messages
3,212
Points
29
michaelskis said:
But here is the Clincher... I am still going to work full time, and I would like to drive no more than an hour and a half (one way) if possible. Does anyone from this area have any information on programs?
I'm sure Western has a lot of opportunities for you, however, you may want to look into into CMU's College of Extending Learning - http://www.cel.cmich.edu/programs/default.html

I think you can get a master's of science in administration, similar to an MPA, but with a concentration in public admin. Not the same thing, I know, but worth a look-see. This link might be helpful:

http://www.cel.cmich.edu/programs/concentrations.html?src=&dc=MSA&cc=81A
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
Messages
10,080
Points
34
Elisabeth said:
I've been exploring the option of doing a dual degree in planning and law. Does anyone have any insight into this option as far as the possibility of more (or less) career opportunities go? Thanks!
If you want to be a lawyer, get a law degree. As a planner, having a good understanding of the law will help you, but having a law degree is likely to be an impediment to getting employed.
 

SW MI Planner

Cyburbian
Messages
3,194
Points
26
You are real close to Western (http://www.wmich.edu/geography/gradprog.html) which has a masters program. Plus you are about an hour away from the following schools:

Michigan State: http://www.ssc.msu.edu/~urp/index.html

University of Michigan: http://www.tcaup.umich.edu/acadpgm/urp/urp.html

Eastern Michigan University: http://www.emich.edu/public/geo/plng.frameset.html

It kind of depends on what you are looking for. EMU just changed it's program a year or so ago and is now masters in GIS and Planning, and its in the Geography dept. Whereas when I graduated (2000) I got a master in Geography. So, there is a healthy dose of GIS involved if that's something your interested in. They also have a wonderful historic preservation program in the Geography dept - I took quite a few of their classes. I can try to answer any questions you may have about EMU - I really liked it there.

Wanigas went to UofM, so he might try to help you out there as well. Their program is combined with the architecture school and so you might get a little more of the urban design curriculum that you mentioned.

I don't know about the Western program - maybe Josh could answer any questions on their program. I am sure the MI State program is good too, but don't know much about it.
 

Jen

Cyburbian
Messages
1,704
Points
26
WHoa, WMU has grown up since graduated in 95. It seems I just looked a couple years ago and they had no masters programs for planning, just a generic geog degree. Finally they have something to offer in the planning arena!
 
Messages
37
Points
2
biscuit said:
The finacee is currently working on her MBA while working full time - Her BA in historic preservation and planning didn't work out the way she hoped.


I am considering going to graduate school to get a masters in Urban Design coupled with my degree in planning. My reason for quoting you is that your fiancee is going back to school because her 2 BA did not work out. Does she feel that having 2 degrees in different areas is superior then having 2 degrees that are similar?
 

biscuit

Cyburbian
Messages
3,904
Points
25
salomondesignboarder said:
biscuit said:
The finacee is currently working on her MBA while working full time - Her BA in historic preservation and planning didn't work out the way she hoped.


I am considering going to graduate school to get a masters in Urban Design coupled with my degree in planning. My reason for quoting you is that your fiancee is going back to school because her 2 BA did not work out. Does she feel that having 2 degrees in different areas is superior then having 2 degrees that are similar?
Oh no, I guess I should have been a little more clear. The future Mrs. Biscuit only has one BA, a major in Historic Preservation and Community Planning. It's a lot like the Urban Planning program I went through except it's offered through the school of the arts so you don't get the exposure to the social sciences you need for your planning career.

What she found after graduating is that most of the few jobs available required a masters degree in preservation and experience and she had neither. So she made the decision to broaden her potential emplyment opportunities and go for an MBA rather than limiting herself by having two degrees in the same subject.
 

Mud Princess

Cyburbian
Messages
4,898
Points
27
Elisabeth said:
I've been exploring the option of doing a dual degree in planning and law. Does anyone have any insight into this option as far as the possibility of more (or less) career opportunities go? Thanks!
A guy I dated in grad school got his planning degree and went to law school a few years later. He's now a well-published attorney specializing in land use and development issues. I assume he makes gazillions of dollars.
 
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