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Mid career and I hate my job.

el Guapo

Capitalist
Messages
5,983
Points
29
I love the problem solving and working with the vast majority of people I encounter, but I have come to the conclusion that the cards are stacked against us, no one has our back, no one really gives a shit if we do the job correctly or not. The planning professional crap-to-reward ratio is just too high the higher you climb the ladder of crap.

Maybe I'll fell better in the morning, but this has been building for years. Have you ever been in a room full of developers, engineers, applicants, your fellow planners and elected officials and asked yourself, "Is there anyone in this room that wouldn't screw me over professionally for a nickle?"
 
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PlannerGirl

Cyburbian Plus
Messages
6,377
Points
28
Im with you EG I was a happy planner in NC but here in Va the laws and mind set...eh why do I even bother. As you say its a loosing deal no matter what you do. Not real interested in selling out to the dark side, heck Id be back dealing with the same BS I deal with now as a planner and Id KNOW the local communities are full of BS.
 

Suburb Repairman

moderator in moderation
Moderator
Messages
7,310
Points
30
I've considered career switches periodically, but some of that is a temptation to turn one of my hobbies into a profession and that little entrepreneurial spirit in me that would love to run my own small business.

As far as compatible careers go, perhaps you might want to switch to location analysis--which gets you away from some of the politics.



If you want to hurt politicians, perhaps you should consider running an escort service... ;)
 

otterpop

Cyburbian
Messages
6,655
Points
27
I hear you!

El Guapo and Planner Girl,

I feel your pain, because I am experiencing it myself. I like the people I work with. My employers are cool. Most of the public we deal with are good folks who want to do the right thing. The process is wearing me down. The same problems are addressed with the same remedies that haven't worked in the past, so why do we expect them to work now? We get lambasted for trying to do good things and I am not sure the general public sees through the subterfuge of those with ulterior motives. Sometimes it seems like your supposed allies are just moments away from jumping to the other side. Public sector planners serve so many masters (the applicants, the public, the governing body, public agencies, etc.) and each expects something different from us.

But I continue to journey on, because it is my job and I have a family that counts on me.
 

zman

Cyburbian
Messages
9,186
Points
30
Good thing I am not alone. I thought that I was the only one.

I am only 4 years in my career (this week, actually) and I want out of the government. I spent yesterday designing downtown street sections for the town (by hand) and I LOVE drawing.

I hope to get into that. For now? My house probably won't sell and I make good money and I don't drive into work, so I will stay, it isn't so bad, but it isn't for me.
 

Queen B

Cyburbian
Messages
3,179
Points
24
You are not alone...
I think that is why we are here.

I think Land Use Law might give you the opportunity to screw everyone over...
 

The One

Cyburbian
Messages
8,283
Points
29
Yup....

Not alone....:-| I've had more knives put in my back by elected officials, developers and realtors than I can count:-| Blah.......

You should consider being a lobbyist....that could be fun, regardless of what you're pushing.....:D Like RJ said...isn't Rove a lobbyist now? How about resort and recreation management? Find a place with a beach that needs a manager and go for it;)
 

TexanOkie

Cyburbian
Messages
2,903
Points
19
How about resort and recreation management? Find a place with a beach that needs a manager and go for it;)
Or, for that matter, any kind of tourism planning. Then at least you know your clients will most likely be happy elected people and happy people on vacation (which reinforces the happy elected people).
 

luckless pedestrian

Super Moderator
Moderator
Messages
11,024
Points
33
Or, for that matter, any kind of tourism planning. Then at least you know your clients will most likely be happy elected people and happy people on vacation (which reinforces the happy elected people).
Oh really? let me send you a linky to my weekly...:p

Let me pop this bubble right now :6:

People are crazy, self-serving, non-listeners, dishonest, and back-stabbers [insert music] no matter what town/county/state you serve - and, what's even more harsh is those people are in every profession, every office, every neighborhood - so escaping planning will not allow you to escape humanity, especially if you go to law school

so you have to separate the people from what you are doing to accurately assess if it's the profession or the people that are wearing you out - this is not an easy exercise and a spa may have to be involved ;)

the one piece of advice and my cyber-friends can scroll now becasue I think I have posted this story before: when I first left private to go public after 7 years in private, I was assigned to work on a possible rezoning of what was really a business area that was zoned residential as a way to control growth (yeah, I know :r:) - so I did all the textbook planning things - stakeholder meetings, map analysis (hand-drawn days), public workshops, charrettes and all - I came up with the obvious solution of a village zone that would control the size of businesses because that's what they were so worried about - sent it onward to Town Meeting and not only did it fail on Town Meeting floor but it went up in flames and I was flamed violently as "that girl who wrote this piece of crap" - all of 28 yo, I was rightfully traumatized, thought wth am I doing here and then one of my Planning Board members who kinda mothered me a little came up and patted my hand and said "LP, sometimes, people just don't want good planning" - those words have echoed in me for the last 15 years -

I had to learn to let go - to say my peace and then sit back and accept what happens because it's not my decision, it's theirs - yes, I have to live with their mistakes but it's still their doing

so good luck with your introspection and keep us posted - :)
 

Fat Cat

Cyburbian
Messages
1,651
Points
19
Fat Cat

I doubt if any one will disagree with you;)
but it doesnt matter what your profession is, this goes on:r:
If you really like what you are doing stay with it, dont leave because of the roves of the world,
Get some comedy CDs and laugh:-D:D:D
And then think about the situations that you are in and think about the people that you have described and think about how humorous it really is:-D
 

southern_yank

Cyburbian
Messages
134
Points
6
That's the thing about being involved with so many citizens/community groups/agencies. Even if you do your job perfectly and follow the rules, you'll still get on someone's bad side just because of the fact that we have to make compromises. Also, sometimes people aren't going to like you because of the agency you work for, the plan you're pushing, or some obscure thing that happened with your boss 10 years ago. I used to take that stuff so personally. Now, I'm over it.

When I started my career in planning (a whole 2 years ago), I assumed everyone was on my side and wanted the best for the project. Now when I walk into meetings, I'm more on guard and try to figure out people's motives. Like luckless pedestrian said, you gotta be zen about it.

I will say recognizing the selfishness in others makes me appreciate genuine, forthright people even more.
 

btrage

Cyburbian
Messages
6,423
Points
25
To be honest, I sort of find the political side of planning somewhat entertaining. As LP said, some people just don't want our advice.

For me, I thoroughly enjoy the "process" of planning just as much as the end result. If planners focus too much on the end result, then I belive you will eventually tire of the profession.

For those that are tiring of everything, I say sit back, relax and wait. I have a feeling that we may be entering an exciting time for the profession, what with gas prices, climate change, etc. The more and more I talk to regular people and politicians, I get the sense that these people are starting to see the bigger picture. Or maybe I just hope so.
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
Messages
10,078
Points
33
If I had not left government for the private sector I would probably be feeling the same right now. Working in government is the most unrewarding environment I can imagine. Everyone thinks that they are your boss and you need to do their bidding. The politicians use you to take the heat from their bad decisions. The public thinks you are the one responsible for the fact that they did not get the project they wanted. The administration gives you no support. You can win a half dozen awards from your peers and be treated like the village idiot in the town in which you work.

There is no way I could tolerate that anymore. I find that most of the communities I work for actually want a plan. They listen to my ideas. When they don't I know that in a couple months I will finish the project, send them a bill, and not worry about it. The political pressures are pretty much history.

(People who provide current planning, whether working for cities or a consultant, probably have it the worst. Become a long-range planner and never have to worry about a site plan review or rezoning request.)
 

MacheteJames

Cyburbian
Messages
930
Points
19
For those that are tiring of everything, I say sit back, relax and wait. I have a feeling that we may be entering an exciting time for the profession, what with gas prices, climate change, etc. The more and more I talk to regular people and politicians, I get the sense that these people are starting to see the bigger picture. Or maybe I just hope so.
This is what keeps me coming to work... otherwise I'd probably be looking for a way to get back into nonprofits (and still may eventually). The work is far more political than I ever thought possible and I find I have to detach myself from any potential outcomes of the stuff we are working on, good or bad, to stay sane. I've never been in such an environment where I have to measure literally everything I say - the work forces you to learn the language of doublespeak and word-twisting as a survival mechanism. I'm realizing that urban planning as a profession would work like clockwork IF people were fully rational. However, because people in reality tend to be anything but rational, the process breaks down, and the realities described in this thread are what we are left with.
 

gicarto

Cyburbian
Messages
267
Points
10
I am upset with working for government after starting my career 2 and a half years ago. I am starting to look for a private firm that could utilize my services. I'm a visionary thinker and it just seems to me that government work gets to involved in the permitting side of the job.
 

ruralplanner

Cyburbian
Messages
138
Points
6
For those that are tiring of everything, I say sit back, relax and wait. I have a feeling that we may be entering an exciting time for the profession, what with gas prices, climate change, etc. The more and more I talk to regular people and politicians, I get the sense that these people are starting to see the bigger picture. Or maybe I just hope so.
I have to agree with btrage. The comprehensive planning years have been described as the golden years for planners. Having lived through that for too long and seen mediocre results, I now believe that these were not golden years. For me personally, these were my training years. There is a lot of opportunity for planners to really make changes and the single issue of high energy prices (beyond just gas) will likely cause a shift in the way we all live. That is, if energy costs stay high. Eventually this will impact how our communities can sustain themselves environmently, economically and socially. We’ve all heard it before and hear it daily.

Where as comprehensive planning was a planner thing in a planner world, sustainability is a lifestyle thing in everyone’s world and the planning profession IS the group prepared to bring it all together and make things happen.

It may take awhile for people to see the bigger picture, however it is happening and it is happening within the communities. Overtime it will be difficult for politicians to ignore this force and since planners are a link between community and politicians, we are in a unique position to foster this change. Planners are visionaries and local governments are usually not. However planners can change that.

Cardinal stated that working for the government is unrewarding, however working for the government also enables you to work closely with a particular community on a day to day basis to affect change. On the other hand, there are some local governments where change and vision are not embraced. For those planners working for these types of public employers, I’d say bail and find an employer where you can make a difference—either public or private—but don’t bail on the profession.
 

Joshai

Member
Messages
6
Points
0
It seems to me that often times we have to remember that people who don't want help, or who don't see the need for something, are going to be inherently negative and combative towards new ideas. If you're not in planning for the credit, perhaps a good idea is to take a note fromthe books of many very successfull city managers that I've known. Find ways to let those polititians and citizens take ownership of your ideas. For example, if you see a need for more open spaces and recreation facilities in your town, or have been assigned the task of planning for these things, find the council member or public activist who most desires more recreation or find two council members that tend to disagree with each other on principal, and if you can rub elbows with them in a private or casual atmosphere, find a way to let them take an ownership position with the idea. Let them feel like what you want to do was their idea in the first place. Sadly, when you're involved in politics as a paid employee, it is often neccessary to let go of the idea of credit where credit is due, and look at the big picture of being happy that what needed to get done got done. You'll not get away from playing politics as long as you work in government, so it's best to find a way to let the politics work for you.
At least, that's been my experience with 10 years of government service as a paid employee.
 

KSharpe

Cyburbian
Messages
744
Points
18
I want out of planning too, but it has nothing to do with the people. I simply find it boring and overly technical. I'm now in the challenge of trying to move to a "helping profession"- social work type of stuff. Unfortunately, this is hard to do without a social work degree.
 

elpnct

Member
Messages
5
Points
0
Ridgman looks back

It looks alot better when after 20 years or so you can stand on a few sites and see a project completed or underway with real people living there, shopping there, doing all that human stuff and perhaps-just perhaps your involvement at the critical time made it a better project or solution or land plan.
 
Messages
3,690
Points
27
Where as comprehensive planning was a planner thing in a planner world, sustainability is a lifestyle thing in everyone’s world and the planning profession IS the group prepared to bring it all together and make things happen.
Agreed.

However, Guap - is the problem your job, not the profession? When I was in consulting - I hated planning. Mostly I hated the hours, but I also couldn't see that public sector was any better. Until I got into a good public sector, long range planning job. I agree with Cardinal in that Long Range planners have it so much better than current planners.

anyway - i'm sorry you're hating your job - dissatisfaction with your employment tends to bleed into every faction of your life - I hope things get sorted out soon.
 

RandomPlanner

Cyburbian
Messages
1,519
Points
21
Bump.

The new place is not all it's cracked up to be. It's a very different community; it's a VERY different work environment. And I've been told about four times already to keep my opinion to myself. That's something I've never heard at work before. (At home, sure -- all the time. ;) ) Weekdays have become exhausting.

Ho humm...
 

DVD

Cyburbian
Messages
13,301
Points
34
Bump.

The new place is not all it's cracked up to be. It's a very different community; it's a VERY different work environment. And I've been told about four times already to keep my opinion to myself. That's something I've never heard at work before. (At home, sure -- all the time. ;) ) Weekdays have become exhausting.

Ho humm...
Sorry to hear that. Sounds like the place is stuck in a rut and needs your opinions more than they know.
 

luckless pedestrian

Super Moderator
Moderator
Messages
11,024
Points
33
sorry random - there are few worse gut hits than feeling like it's not a good fit when you start the job - I hope you can find your niche to settle in and/or work your resume so it's not time wasted

what's also amazing is reading this thread from 2008 - wow :-o
 

DVD

Cyburbian
Messages
13,301
Points
34
sorry random - there are few worse gut hits than feeling like it's not a good fit when you start the job - I hope you can find your niche to settle in and/or work your resume so it's not time wasted

what's also amazing is reading this thread from 2008 - wow :-o
Don't you have a gig related to this coming up in a couple weeks? :)
 

RandomPlanner

Cyburbian
Messages
1,519
Points
21
Sorry to hear that. Sounds like the place is stuck in a rut and needs your opinions more than they know.
sorry random - there are few worse gut hits than feeling like it's not a good fit when you start the job - I hope you can find your niche to settle in and/or work your resume so it's not time wasted...
Thanks folks. I've been in my career for a dozen or so years and I've never experienced something quite like it. It must be a great learning opportunity for me, right? Right??
 

DVD

Cyburbian
Messages
13,301
Points
34
Thanks folks. I've been in my career for a dozen or so years and I've never experienced something quite like it. It must be a great learning opportunity for me, right? Right??
You can always learn by example, right or wrong. Just take mental notes that it's wrong.

I'm learning at my current job to let go of petty things because that's the way they like it. If it's not causing a problem it doesn't need a permit or to be regulated in any way. I'm taking this lesson to learn more managerial stuff like pick your battles.
 

RandomPlanner

Cyburbian
Messages
1,519
Points
21
Pick your battles.
Deal with things head on.
Move through it and move past it.
You can only do what you can do.
Do not let them look down on you... but set an example.
The goal is to dream, but also to act on what is possible, to trust that... where we are now is not where we'll be forever.

I'm learning, I'm learning.
 

luckless pedestrian

Super Moderator
Moderator
Messages
11,024
Points
33
and breathe...:balloon:

my Dad used to say the following phrases to me:


have faith in your fate


all your decisions are the right ones
 

The Terminator

Cyburbian
Messages
1,594
Points
21
Random:

Ask yourself this: Do you HATE the job to the point that you despise it, your coworkers, supervisors and feel the work you do is banal?

Last year I was at a job with a non-profit housing agency. I was providing planning support for some affordable housing projects in my area (zoning studies, site feasibility etc.) as well as policy advocacy (organizing community members to support certain projects, helping in lobbying campaigns against our local Republican demagogues). There were things within the organization that PISSED ME OFF to no end (tactless co workers, lack of organizational structure, poor management) BUT I really enjoyed the work I was doing, got along well with my boss and found the work I was producing to be meaningful, so I stayed at it, despite the nonsense. And now that I'm in a more traditional Land Use Planning job, I'm finding there are aspects of my old job that I miss (even if I wanted to rip out my hair sometimes during the course of it).

If you see reward in the work try and stick it out and see if you can adapt and maybe things would get better.

But if it really is that dreadful than don't torture yourself, pack up the '65 Chev and and get the hell out of there! Your mental health isn't worth it if there is no tangible benefits you can enjoy.
 

MacheteJames

Cyburbian
Messages
930
Points
19
Random:

Ask yourself this: Do you HATE the job to the point that you despise it, your coworkers, supervisors and feel the work you do is banal?

Last year I was at a job with a non-profit housing agency. I was providing planning support for some affordable housing projects in my area (zoning studies, site feasibility etc.) as well as policy advocacy (organizing community members to support certain projects, helping in lobbying campaigns against our local Republican demagogues). There were things within the organization that PISSED ME OFF to no end (tactless co workers, lack of organizational structure, poor management) BUT I really enjoyed the work I was doing, got along well with my boss and found the work I was producing to be meaningful, so I stayed at it, despite the nonsense. And now that I'm in a more traditional Land Use Planning job, I'm finding there are aspects of my old job that I miss (even if I wanted to rip out my hair sometimes during the course of it).

If you see reward in the work try and stick it out and see if you can adapt and maybe things would get better.

But if it really is that dreadful than don't torture yourself, pack up the '65 Chev and and get the hell out of there! Your mental health isn't worth it if there is no tangible benefits you can enjoy.
Did you somehow work at my old nonprofit? I felt the same way. Must be something endemic to the nonprofit world. As a former nonprofit and public sector type turn dark-sider, I do find myself missing public interaction, better hours (and no billable hours!), and better time off benefits. Each sector has its own pluses and minuses. When I was in the public sector, dealing with the never-ending politics and crazy people coming into the office took their toll.
 

thoedani

Member
Messages
1
Points
0
I have had similar struggles with a newish job, Random Planner. I've recently tried to readjust how I look at going to work every day. Instead of "going to work" I look at it as "going to my career" and try to do what I can in my situation to get the most out of it.

For me, not being asked for my opinion results in finishing my work quickly and having downtime. In addition to making it known I would like more work (especially more involved work), I'm finding time to prep my AICP exam materials & begin studying, reading all sorts of policy blogs & papers, staying on top of local politics/developments so I have a ready answer if I am asked my opinion, keeping an eye out for jobs in the area, and now posting here after being a lurker for many years :)

Don't know if any of that applies to you, but you're not alone in the frustration!
 

Masswich

Cyburbian
Messages
1,303
Points
23
Unless it's really unbearable don't make any quick decisions. I think the idea of thinking about your career rather than just this job is a good one. Sometimes bad jobs turn into better ones if a bad boss or political leader leaves. Or you put in a year or three and move on.

Easy for me to say, I know. I actually have left a bad job once very quickly to go back to another place I had left. But I also left an OK job with no alternative plan and that was not a wise move.
 

RandomPlanner

Cyburbian
Messages
1,519
Points
21
I don't plan on making any rash decisions and you're right, thoedani, I can use my down time to increase my knowledge. My last gig was only a year (because of a family move) so I'd like to be here longer than that. But yes, I'm keeping my eyes open and will definitely leave if the new opportunity is right. And the job is giving me different experience and good or bad [hint -- it's bad], I can use that to my advantage.

So when I'm in my next interview and I'm asked "tell me about a challenging work environment and how you dealt with it?", I'll have the answers down pat!
 

B'lieve

Cyburbian
Messages
212
Points
9
Slightly off-topic (since none of my hate-the-job experiences involved planning, and I can't add much to the good advice already here),
Welcome, thoedani!
 

el Guapo

Capitalist
Messages
5,983
Points
29
10 Years Later...

I love the problem solving and working with the vast majority of people I encounter, but I have come to the conclusion that the cards are stacked against us, no one has our back, no one really gives a shit if we do the job correctly or not. The planning professional crap-to-reward ratio is just too high the higher you climb the ladder of crap.

Maybe I'll fell better in the morning, but this has been building for years. Have you ever been in a room full of developers, engineers, applicants, your fellow planners and elected officials and asked yourself, "Is there anyone in this room that wouldn't screw me over professionally for a nickle?"
I had forgotten that I made the post above. I found it when I was trying to determine the last time I posted on Cyburbia.

Here is a short update: So I quit that old planner/department head life. In December of 2010 I gave my employer five months notice, moved, began law school, divorced my wife, and I started a GIS business while in law school. I structured the business so it eliminated the things I hated about being a planner and working with the public in general. In 2014 I passed the bar and now provide geospatial services to attorneys and businesses. I'm now what people call 'happy' and I control my destiny - completely. Along the way I dropped 40 lbs because my life didn't suck anymore. I also have REALLY enjoyed being single. Since 2010 my politics moved from being a skeptical moderate conservative to very skeptical libertarian.

So, here's my unsolicited advice: If your life sucks - do something about it.

While it took me 10 years, and about $500,000 to fix my life, I'd say it was worth it.
 

Michele Zone

BANNED
Messages
7,657
Points
28
I had forgotten that I made the post above. I found it when I was trying to determine the last time I posted on Cyburbia.

Here is a short update: So I quit that old planner/department head life. In December of 2010 I gave my employer five months notice, moved, began law school, divorced my wife, and I started a GIS business while in law school. I structured the business so it eliminated the things I hated about being a planner and working with the public in general. In 2014 I passed the bar and now provide geospatial services to attorneys and businesses. I'm now what people call 'happy' and I control my destiny - completely. Along the way I dropped 40 lbs because my life didn't suck anymore. I also have REALLY enjoyed being single. Since 2010 my politics moved from being a skeptical moderate conservative to very skeptical libertarian.

So, here's my unsolicited advice: If your life sucks - do something about it.

While it took me 10 years, and about $500,000 to fix my life, I'd say it was worth it.
Thank you for the update.

Are you still in Kansas? Or did all these changes involve a geographic relocation as well? (I don't need specifics. I'm not looking for your home address.)
 

kjel

Super Moderator
Moderator
Messages
11,901
Points
31
I had forgotten that I made the post above. I found it when I was trying to determine the last time I posted on Cyburbia.

Here is a short update: So I quit that old planner/department head life. In December of 2010 I gave my employer five months notice, moved, began law school, divorced my wife, and I started a GIS business while in law school. I structured the business so it eliminated the things I hated about being a planner and working with the public in general. In 2014 I passed the bar and now provide geospatial services to attorneys and businesses. I'm now what people call 'happy' and I control my destiny - completely. Along the way I dropped 40 lbs because my life didn't suck anymore. I also have REALLY enjoyed being single. Since 2010 my politics moved from being a skeptical moderate conservative to very skeptical libertarian.

So, here's my unsolicited advice: If your life sucks - do something about it.

While it took me 10 years, and about $500,000 to fix my life, I'd say it was worth it.
Nice to see you check in eG. Glad to hear you are in a good space.
 

michaelskis

Cyburbian
Messages
19,104
Points
42
I had forgotten that I made the post above. I found it when I was trying to determine the last time I posted on Cyburbia.

Here is a short update: So I quit that old planner/department head life. In December of 2010 I gave my employer five months notice, moved, began law school, divorced my wife, and I started a GIS business while in law school. I structured the business so it eliminated the things I hated about being a planner and working with the public in general. In 2014 I passed the bar and now provide geospatial services to attorneys and businesses. I'm now what people call 'happy' and I control my destiny - completely. Along the way I dropped 40 lbs because my life didn't suck anymore. I also have REALLY enjoyed being single. Since 2010 my politics moved from being a skeptical moderate conservative to very skeptical libertarian.

So, here's my unsolicited advice: If your life sucks - do something about it.

While it took me 10 years, and about $500,000 to fix my life, I'd say it was worth it.
WOW... talk about super timely... although my relationship with my wife is super good right now.

As for politics, I am right there with you.
 

Suburb Repairman

moderator in moderation
Moderator
Messages
7,310
Points
30
I had forgotten that I made the post above. I found it when I was trying to determine the last time I posted on Cyburbia.

Here is a short update: So I quit that old planner/department head life. In December of 2010 I gave my employer five months notice, moved, began law school, divorced my wife, and I started a GIS business while in law school. I structured the business so it eliminated the things I hated about being a planner and working with the public in general. In 2014 I passed the bar and now provide geospatial services to attorneys and businesses. I'm now what people call 'happy' and I control my destiny - completely. Along the way I dropped 40 lbs because my life didn't suck anymore. I also have REALLY enjoyed being single. Since 2010 my politics moved from being a skeptical moderate conservative to very skeptical libertarian.

So, here's my unsolicited advice: If your life sucks - do something about it.

While it took me 10 years, and about $500,000 to fix my life, I'd say it was worth it.
Sounds like a great move for you!

Are you doing any specialized work in election districting? There is huge money in that for local governments with single-member districts. We just transitioned partly to single-member districts, and I could not believe what we paid an attorney with a geospatial team to do it given how relatively simple it is.
 

RandomPlanner

Cyburbian
Messages
1,519
Points
21
I had forgotten that I made the post above. I found it when I was trying to determine the last time I posted on Cyburbia.

Here is a short update: So I quit that old planner/department head life. In December of 2010 I gave my employer five months notice, moved, began law school, divorced my wife, and I started a GIS business while in law school. I structured the business so it eliminated the things I hated about being a planner and working with the public in general. In 2014 I passed the bar and now provide geospatial services to attorneys and businesses. I'm now what people call 'happy' and I control my destiny - completely. Along the way I dropped 40 lbs because my life didn't suck anymore. I also have REALLY enjoyed being single. Since 2010 my politics moved from being a skeptical moderate conservative to very skeptical libertarian.

So, here's my unsolicited advice: If your life sucks - do something about it.

While it took me 10 years, and about $500,000 to fix my life, I'd say it was worth it.
So glad to hear that you're in a better place, el Guapo.

I also am doing much better, switched jobs less than a year from hire date, and love my new job (most days)! Just goes to show you -- today's problems are not permanent. They will look very different when you've made it to the other side!
 
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