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Architecture Mid-century modern houses

mendelman

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Mid-Century architecture has really grown on me over the past decade or so. This house hit the market in Metro Detroit and somebody posted some pictures of it on my Instagram feed. This has to be one of the cooler looking houses I've ever seen.
Someone spent some major bucks to design and build that house. It's awesome.

But they are/were always sited in isolation. Imagine a whole 1/2 acre lot neighborhood of these.
 

WSU MUP Student

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Someone spent some major bucks to design and build that house. It's awesome.

But they are/were always sited in isolation. Imagine a whole 1/2 acre lot neighborhood of these.
There is a neighborhood (well, one small dead-end street really) out near Kalamazoo called "The Acres" that was designed as a Frank Lloyd Wright Usonian neighborhood with 5 or 6 houses all on 1 acre lots. IIRC, it was intended to have 20+ Usonian style homes, all on 1 acre lots and built around some common areas but for whatever multitude of reasons, the neighborhood never finished building out and even now it's still a pretty rural area.

Closer to Detroit there is a neighborhood called Wabeek here in Bloomfield Hills where most of the houses are on smaller lots (1/2 acre or less) as well as some duplexes or attached condos. The neighborhood was primarily built out in phases in the 60s, 70s, and 80s and while there is a lot of traditional boring colonial houses of that era, there are quite a few MCM and International style houses mixed in there. And then smack dab in the middle of the neighborhood there is a massive 12,000 square foot 1920s Tudor mansion (it was the summer cottage for the original owner of the land). The whole neighborhood is about 700 acres with a few hundred homes built around a country club and two lakes with a wide variety of home prices and sizes. As a whole subdivision, it's definitely one of the more interesting ones that I've come across in Metro Detroit.
 

mendelman

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There is a neighborhood (well, one small dead-end street really) out near Kalamazoo called "The Acres" that was designed as a Frank Lloyd Wright Usonian neighborhood with 5 or 6 houses all on 1 acre lots. IIRC, it was intended to have 20+ Usonian style homes, all on 1 acre lots and built around some common areas but for whatever multitude of reasons, the neighborhood never finished building out and even now it's still a pretty rural area.

Closer to Detroit there is a neighborhood called Wabeek here in Bloomfield Hills where most of the houses are on smaller lots (1/2 acre or less) as well as some duplexes or attached condos. The neighborhood was primarily built out in phases in the 60s, 70s, and 80s and while there is a lot of traditional boring colonial houses of that era, there are quite a few MCM and International style houses mixed in there. And then smack dab in the middle of the neighborhood there is a massive 12,000 square foot 1920s Tudor mansion (it was the summer cottage for the original owner of the land). The whole neighborhood is about 700 acres with a few hundred homes built around a country club and two lakes with a wide variety of home prices and sizes. As a whole subdivision, it's definitely one of the more interesting ones that I've come across in Metro Detroit.
I'll have to find that neighborhood next time we're in that neck of the Metro Detroit woods. That part of the region is the epicenter for the confluence of 'cool' and wealthy households of the 1960s.
 

Maister

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Mid-Century architecture has really grown on me over the past decade or so. This house hit the market in Metro Detroit and somebody posted some pictures of it on my Instagram feed. This has to be one of the cooler looking houses I've ever seen.

View attachment 46938
Seems like this style of 'modern' residential design flourished for a few brief years with its' epicenter being some time in the early 1970's
 

michaelskis

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Mid-Century architecture has really grown on me over the past decade or so. This house hit the market in Metro Detroit and somebody posted some pictures of it on my Instagram feed. This has to be one of the cooler looking houses I've ever seen.
I am not a fan. I like the massing, general minimalist approach, and visual openness to the natural forested environment. However the furnishings, wasted space, and retro features are all turn offs for me. Perhaps if they swapped out the wood paneling with drywall and introduced steel elements to provide a nod to industrialism, it would establish the a better juxtaposition.

But then again, I live in a new craftsman wannabe at the end of a cul-de-sac in a suburban neighborhood, so what do I know.
 

Maister

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There is a neighborhood (well, one small dead-end street really) out near Kalamazoo called "The Acres" that was designed as a Frank Lloyd Wright Usonian neighborhood with 5 or 6 houses all on 1 acre lots. IIRC, it was intended to have 20+ Usonian style homes, all on 1 acre lots and built around some common areas but for whatever multitude of reasons, the neighborhood never finished building out and even now it's still a pretty rural area.
Sounds like you're referring to a mini-neighborhood the locals call 'Parkwyn Village'
You can take a google spin through the neighborhood here:

It's fairly well wooded these days, but you can still see glimpses of the Wright inspired homes.
 

WSU MUP Student

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Sounds like you're referring to a mini-neighborhood the locals call 'Parkwyn Village'
You can take a google spin through the neighborhood here:

It's fairly well wooded these days, but you can still see glimpses of the Wright inspired homes.
I forgot about that one, but The Acres is a separate development further east in Galesburg. It was originally developed for some engineers from Upjohn but never built out as successfully as Parkwyn. There's no Google Streetview available for the road that the houses are now on, but you can sort of see them here: https://www.google.com/maps/place/Galesburg,+MI+49053/@42.2589299,-85.4121047,253a,35y,39.35t/data=!3m1!1e3!4m5!3m4!1s0x881790162597acf5:0xc32a4a998d61a7b3!8m2!3d42.2886529!4d-85.418056
 

Maister

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WSU MUP Student

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Here's a couple more near me:

This one pops up on the market on occasion but doesn't seem to actually sell (I'd be interested to know why). It popped up again a couple of weeks ago and says a sale is pending so who knows. It's a cool one when you drive or walk past but I have a feeling potential buyers are put off but the oddly sized lot and it's topography (plus, if you're going to pay that much in the city, you'd usually want to be closer to downtown):

This one was one of 39 model homes built back in the early '50s and then featured in a Better Homes and Garden spread in September 1953. The Zillow listing still has a copy of the Better Homes and Garden feature that you can read. I drive past this quite frequently and it seems like the people who bought it a few years back are continually doing some sort of work to it. When it hit the market a few years back I actually convinced my wife that we should go look at it but the fact that it was right on a corner of a major road meant it was probably going to be a hard sell for either of us.

 

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No, but this one is.



This home was built in MSM style, in 2008. I think WSU MUP Student knows its first owner (as I do also).
Yep. I used to bowl with them when there were here in Detroit. The pool was added after the house was built and had been given its LEED certification. I am not a LEED guy but I wonder how that would affect a LEED rating?

Further down the architectural rabbit hole - IIRC, the uncle of the original owner of that house from @Doohickie's previous post was noteworthy architecture and landscape photographer Balthazar Korab. Here's a gallery of some of his work: http://www.korabimage.com/balthazar-korab/famed-architects
 

Veloise

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Here's a couple more near me:

This one pops up on the market on occasion but doesn't seem to actually sell (I'd be interested to know why). It popped up again a couple of weeks ago and says a sale is pending so who knows. It's a cool one when you drive or walk past but I have a feeling potential buyers are put off but the oddly sized lot and it's topography (plus, if you're going to pay that much in the city, you'd usually want to be closer to downtown):

This one was one of 39 model homes built back in the early '50s and then featured in a Better Homes and Garden spread in September 1953. The Zillow listing still has a copy of the Better Homes and Garden feature that you can read. I drive past this quite frequently and it seems like the people who bought it a few years back are continually doing some sort of work to it. When it hit the market a few years back I actually convinced my wife that we should go look at it but the fact that it was right on a corner of a major road meant it was probably going to be a hard sell for either of us.

Kinross has such strange photos. That one BR with the closet and piece of furniture acting as window coverings ... the crazy little dog ... the toy vehicle collection ...
Here are a few pics from my parents' house. No, not LEED, not inviting, poorly designed for family living in many respects.
 

WSU MUP Student

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Kinross has such strange photos. That one BR with the closet and piece of furniture acting as window coverings ... the crazy little dog ... the toy vehicle collection ...
Here are a few pics from my parents' house. No, not LEED, not inviting, poorly designed for family living in many respects.
Every time I drive past your parents house, I glance over that way to see if there's a for sale sign as it would be interesting to see the interior (I'm really just interested in the big windows overlooking the ravine). I can never tell if the house is currently occupied or if somebody's just holding on to. When we were house shopping back in '09 we actually looked at a house right across Lahser on Riverview. It was a really nice house but had a tiny backyard with a very steep drop into the Rouge River almost directly off the patio and didn't seem very child-safe. FWIW, that neighborhood (Riverview, Normandale, Vernon, Woodhaven...) is one of my favorite to run through because it's so easy to get lost and so many individual streets actually connect out to all the main roads.

Zillow used to have better (more recent?) pics of the interior of the house on Kinross but I think they got removed last time it sold and it somehow reverted to some of the older pics instead of having no pictures at all. And I actually really did the toy vehicle collection.
 

Whose Yur Planner

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Mid-Century architecture has really grown on me over the past decade or so. This house hit the market in Metro Detroit and somebody posted some pictures of it on my Instagram feed. This has to be one of the cooler looking houses I've ever seen.

View attachment 46938

View attachment 46939

View attachment 46940
I'm prbably going to get branded as a heathen for this, but I'm just not a fan of mid century/minimalist look. Plus, it's terribly dated now and didn't age well.
 
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mendelman

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Plus, it's terrible dated now and didn't age well.
I'd have to disagree. In the wider culture and my personal opinion, this design period has certainly passed from outdated to retro-fashionable, especially if you have/find good original examples (housewares, furniture, decor, houses, etc.).

The same is happening currently in the classic car market with 1970s station wagons. Prices for original examples are selling at prices unheard of just 10 years ago - See here and here.
 
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Dan

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RJing today. Have to get ready for a wedding we're attending in NYC this weekend. It's a white tie midtown Manhattan affair, and I'm reminding myself to pick up my tux in an hour. We're treating this as a weekend-long "date night".

Mid-century architecture: When my wife and I were house hunting, we saw a "mid-century light" house on an exurban frontage lot. We passed on it. It never had any updates (like so many houses around here), the lot was too big for me to reasonably maintain, and it was across the street from "a spiritual center for meditation, healing and study" where large gatherings and day-long drum circles are common. When we were checking out the place, I saw an AICP certificate hanging in the den! The name on it was unfamiliar, though.

The bulk of mid-century architecture around here is in a well-off suburb that's populated mostly by university professors and administrators. There's a lot more 1970s/1980s shed/cedar contemporary architecture than 1950s/1950s mid-centuty.
 

Veloise

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Every time I drive past your parents house, I glance over that way to see if there's a for sale sign as it would be interesting to see the interior (I'm really just interested in the big windows overlooking the ravine). I can never tell if the house is currently occupied or if somebody's just holding on to. When we were house shopping back in '09 we actually looked at a house right across Lahser on Riverview. It was a really nice house but had a tiny backyard with a very steep drop into the Rouge River almost directly off the patio and didn't seem very child-safe. FWIW, that neighborhood (Riverview, Normandale, Vernon, Woodhaven...) is one of my favorite to run through because it's so easy to get lost and so many individual streets actually connect out to all the main roads.

Zillow used to have better (more recent?) pics of the interior of the house on Kinross but I think they got removed last time it sold and it somehow reverted to some of the older pics instead of having no pictures at all. And I actually really did the toy vehicle collection.
architect rendering

Pretty sure it's still unoccupied. Go peer in the windows. Wave to the folks next door, if DCDS hasn't managed to scoop up their home too.

Family room looking south


right after we moved in, 1969


Dining area, kitchen is to the left, patio and the slope to the right


Living room facing Hilltop


image003.jpg

Dining table 2002
11-02-4.JPG
Family room ceiling (a flat roof in Michigan, sheesh)
PC140015.JPG
Back with patio looking at dining room
sideyard.jpg
 
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kjel

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Doohickie

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I'm prbably going to get branded as a heathen for this, but I'm just a fan of mid century/minimalist look. Plus, it's terrible dated now and didn't age well.
There are sub-types within the MCM style. It seems like several of the examples cited here are MCM toward the brutalist end of the spectrum. There's one like that for sale a block away from me and I just don't like it. No windows at eye level on the front facade, just windows up high.



Again... not very inviting.

But others like the one I posted earlier have a certain charm that hearkens back to that mid-century Jetson's vibe of being ultra-modern... but not too pretentious. Not sure if the distinction I'm trying to make is coming through; unfortunately I don't have the vocabulary to talk about the fine distinctions in my mind.

In the listing you can see my house in picture 17 of 17 (toward the right side of the frame).
 

Whose Yur Planner

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There are sub-types within the MCM style. It seems like several of the examples cited here are MCM toward the brutalist end of the spectrum. There's one like that for sale a block away from me and I just don't like it. No windows at eye level on the front facade, just windows up high.



Again... not very inviting.

But others like the one I posted earlier have a certain charm that hearkens back to that mid-century Jetson's vibe of being ultra-modern... but not too pretentious. Not sure if the distinction I'm trying to make is coming through; unfortunately I don't have the vocabulary to talk about the fine distinctions in my mind.

In the listing you can see my house in picture 17 of 17 (toward the right side of the frame).
We have several houses like this and several ones that are more Jetsonsish. I'm more a fan of either the New Orleans to Southern vernacular. At one time , I wanted A Frame house until my mother pointed out that I'm 6'4". A Frames don't quite work when you're tall.
 

Dan

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Back to mid-century architecture.

I grew up in a densely populated neighborhood at the far northeast end of the CIty of Buffalo. Most of it was platted into 30' to 40' wide lots in the late 1800s. About 80% of residential development took place between 1918 and 1929, with infill on most of the remaining lots in the late 1940s and ealry 1950s. Of the thousands of houses in Kensington, about 90% were Buffalo-style bungalows and two-flats, with some semi-bungalows, income bungalows, small four-squares, Dutch Colonials, small Cape Cods, and Colonial variants.

Really modern mid-century houses are uncommon in Buffalo. Ask anyone in Buffalo's preservation, architectural appreciation, or local history community how many mid-century modern houses there are on the East Side. They'll all say "one" -- the Robert T. Coles house at 321 Humboldt Parkway. (Coles was an African-American architect whose thinking on urbanism was decades ahead of his time, but that's for another post.) Anyhow, they're all wrong. The correct answer is "three". Here's the other two.

godfrey_01.JPG

godfrey_02.JPG

godfrey_03.JPG

This is 55 and 59 Godfrey Street in Kensington, the last lots developed in a part of Kensington platted in the 1920s as "Home Acres".

Nobody in Buffalo's preservation, history, or planning-adjacent community knows anything about the Godfrey Street MCM houses, much less even knows they exist. But I do. ;)

Roxie Gian ("Gianfranceschi" Americanized), a prominent shopping center developer in 1950s Buffalo, built Northtown Plaza (then called Falls Boulevard Shopping Center), Transittown Plaza, South Shore Plaza, Lockport Plaza, Payne Plaza, and about 30 Loblaws supermarkets. He also built 55 and 59 Godfrey Street in Kensington. 55 Godfrey was Gian's gift to his parents, who immigrated to Buffalo from Italy.

"Italians in Northeast Buffalo? I thought they all lived on the West Side then." Kensington was one of Buffalo's earliest "post-ethnic" neighborhoods, and it also had a broad range of income groups. There used to be a German-American plurality, but the area was ethnically mixed from the 1920s to the 1990s, when resegregation was in full swing.
 

Maister

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This is the Man Crush Monday houses thread? Hmm....
Yes, what exactly does MCM stand for? Mid Century.......meals? My Car's Make? Many Chewing Monkeys? There's potential for another split here maybe!
 

WSU MUP Student

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Hollin Hills in Alexandria, VA is a neighborhood full of MCM homes. I had the pleasure of staying in one a few years ago with a friend that was house sitting. Current listings https://www.poolebraunteam.com/popular-searches/hollin-hills-real-estate/?r=1-12&map_mode=grid
There are a lot of cool houses in those listings. Those remind me a lot of a couple neighborhoods around here that have a good number of MCM homes tucked away in some rolling hills and with mature trees. The Wabeek neighborhood I mentioned above is probably a bit too Brutalist for many peoples tastes and it looks like they've had some strict landscaping restrictions over the years so you never really got much softening of the lines with more mature trees and shrubs.


This is the Man Crush Monday houses thread? Hmm....
Yes, what exactly does MCM stand for? Mid Century.......meals? My Car's Make? Many Chewing Monkeys? There's potential for another split here maybe!
I thought I had inadvertently started a thread about houses for the Marine Corps Marathon?
 

Whose Yur Planner

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Back to mid-century architecture.

I grew up in a densely populated neighborhood at the far northeast end of the CIty of Buffalo. Most of it was platted into 30' to 40' wide lots in the late 1800s. About 80% of residential development took place between 1918 and 1929, with infill on most of the remaining lots in the late 1940s and ealry 1950s. Of the thousands of houses in Kensington, about 90% were Buffalo-style bungalows and two-flats, with some semi-bungalows, income bungalows, small four-squares, Dutch Colonials, small Cape Cods, and Colonial variants.

Really modern mid-century houses are uncommon in Buffalo. Ask anyone in Buffalo's preservation, architectural appreciation, or local history community how many mid-century modern houses there are on the East Side. They'll all say "one" -- the Robert T. Coles house at 321 Humboldt Parkway. (Robert T Coles was an African-American architecture whose thinking on urbanism was decades ahead of his time, but that's for another post.) Anyhow, they're all wrong. The correct answer is "three". Here's the other two.

View attachment 46975

View attachment 46977

View attachment 46976

This is 55 and 59 Godfrey Street in Kensington, the last lots developed in a part of Kensington platted in the 1920s as "Home Acres".

Nobody in Buffalo's preservation, history, or planning-adjacent community knows anything about the Godfrey MCM houses, much less even knows they exist. But I do. ;)

Roxie Gian ("Gianfranceschi" Americanized), a prominent shopping center developer in 1950s Buffalo, built Northtown Plaza (then called Falls Boulevard Shopping Center), Transittown Plaza, South Shore Plaza, Lockport Plaza, Payne Plaza, and about 30 Loblaws supermarkets. He also built 55 and 59 Godfrey Street in Kensingtin. 55 Godfrey was Gian's gift to his parents, who immigrated to Buffalo from Italy.

"Italians in Northeast Buffalo? I thought they all lived on the West Side then." Kensington was one of Buffalo's earliest "post-ethnic" neighborhoods, and it also had a broad range of income groups. There used to be a German-American plurality, but the area was ethnically mixed from the 1920s to the 1990s, when resegregation was in full swing.
The house in the third picture is down right ugly. The house in the first two pictures has a cobbled together look and feel to it. Like Picasso tried to design a house.
 

WSU MUP Student

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The house in the third picture is down right ugly. The house in the first two pictures has a cobbled together look and feel to it. Like Picasso tried to design a house.
At first glance, I thought the house in the first two pictures was originally a small ranch house that got a 2nd floor addition at some point and the owners decided to make it a little more interesting than what the owners did to this place:

1571406004040.png

This one further up the street isn't much better:
1571406402951.png

This particular neighborhood is pretty nice but everytime I run or drive past those two houses they really irk me (especially that top house). I don't think it's particularly easy to add a natural looking 2nd floor addition to most ranch houses from the '50s and '60s but that one on the top looks like they didn't even try.
 

kjel

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There are a lot of cool houses in those listings. Those remind me a lot of a couple neighborhoods around here that have a good number of MCM homes tucked away in some rolling hills and with mature trees. The Wabeek neighborhood I mentioned above is probably a bit too Brutalist for many peoples tastes and it looks like they've had some strict landscaping restrictions over the years so you never really got much softening of the lines with more mature trees and shrubs.
The one that I stayed in was very similar to 2201 Paul Spring Road (Page 2). It was definitely one of the cooler digs I've stayed in and was actually pretty family friendly in design.
 

Maister

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I knew a former resident of Parkwyn Village and asked what he thought of the whole living in a cool-looking MCM house. His response was it'd be a lot cooler without all the roof leaks. Apparently, a not uncommon issue among flat and shallow pitched roofs.
 

Whose Yur Planner

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I knew a former resident of Parkwyn Village and asked what he thought of the whole living in a cool-looking MCM house. His response was it'd be a lot cooler without all the roof leaks. Apparently, a not uncommon issue among flat and shallow pitched roofs.
Wouldn't a flat or shallow pitched roof cause a problem in snow country?
 

Doohickie

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I knew a former resident of Parkwyn Village and asked what he thought of the whole living in a cool-looking MCM house. His response was it'd be a lot cooler without all the roof leaks. Apparently, a not uncommon issue among flat and shallow pitched roofs.
Flat roofs are fine if they're done right. Too many roofers don't know how to do it right (and don't want to admit it).
 

Veloise

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Wouldn't a flat or shallow pitched roof cause a problem in snow country?
Yes.

roof2.jpg ROOF6.JPG roof1.jpg

Due to the topography, you can't see the roof slope. After about the third time that a major ceiling and roof membrane repair was needed, my brother and I suggested adding a pitched roof with special gutters to channel the run-off to the interior drainage channels. Pops refused to consider this (probably because he didn't understand it).
trash 11-12-2.jpg
 

kjel

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Flat roofs are fine if they're done right. Too many roofers don't know how to do it right (and don't want to admit it).
I have a flat roof and that's fairly common in urban NJ where many homes are of the rowhome or brownstone type. The running joke is not if it will fail, but when. Most warranties on flat roofs are for 10 years.
 

Dan

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More MCM around Buffalo. I knew there would be a good reason for taking these photos years ago.

The bulk of custom one-off MCM houses in the Buffalo area are in Amherst.

These houses are on Lebrun Drive, the address to have in the 1950s and 1960s. Lebrun Drive is part of Amherst Estates, one of the first developments in suburban Buffalo for the Social Register crowd. Amherst Estates was platted in 1909, just past the city line, and the thousands of 30' and 35' lots in what would become the Kensington neighborhood.

P1120412.JPG

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There's a fair bit of MCM (relatively speaking) in the Park Club neighborhood.

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Also in the Park Club area, the most METAL cedar contemporary house ever.

P1120423.JPG

This very Californian MCM split, built in 1967, is in the Forest Heights Estates subdivision. It's surrounded by houses representing more typically Northeastern and suburban Buffalo vernacular styles of move-up housing from the era -- center hall Colonials, Northtown Neo-Meds, etc. (I called it the "Brady Bunch house.")

P1120427.JPG

Tonawanda is Buffalo's quintessential 1950s middle class boomburb. Unfortunately, MCM isn't as common there as one would think.

P1120452.JPG

P1120453.JPG

P1120422.JPG
 

Whose Yur Planner

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More MCM around Buffalo. I knew there would be a good reason for taking these photos years ago.

The bulk of custom one-off MCM houses in the Buffalo area are in Amherst.

These houses are on Lebrun Drive, the address to have in the 1950s and 1960s. Lebrun Drive is part of Amherst Estates, one of suburban Buffalo's earliest subdivisions for the Social Register crowd. Amherst Estates was platted in 1909, just across the city line, and the thousands of 30 and 35 foot lots of what would become the Kensington neighborhood.

View attachment 47014

View attachment 47016

There's a fair bit of MCM (relatively speaking) in the Park Club neighborhood.

View attachment 47017

View attachment 47018

View attachment 47019

View attachment 47020

Also in the Park Club area, the most METAL cedar contemporary house ever.

View attachment 47023

This very Californian MCM split, built in 1967, is in the Forest Heights Estates subdivision. It's surrounded by houses representing more typically Northeastern and suburban Buffalo vernacular styles of move-up housing from the era -- center hall Colonials, Northtown Neo-Meds, etc. (I called it the "Brady Bunch house.")

View attachment 47026

Tonawanda is Buffalo's quintessential 1950s middle class boomburb, but MCM isn't as common there as one would think.



View attachment 47022

View attachment 47025

View attachment 47021
Sorry Dan, but those are some ugly houses
 

WSU MUP Student

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Sorry Dan, but those are some ugly houses
Ha! I was thinking the opposite and was going to mention how many of those, especially in the Park Club and Labrun Drive areas, are pretty nice. I especially like the top 2 and they resemble some of the more common MCM homes in this neck of the woods. They aren't the flashiest or highest end MCM, but it seems like that was the style around here for builders who were churning out crappy post-war mass produced subdivisions but who also wanted to mix in a few more interesting or "modern" looking homes or at least add some modern elements to a regular ole ranch house.

Overall, I think these were attempts to be modern while still being more liveable and welcoming than homes like the one I started off the thread with.
 

Dan

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Sorry Dan, but those are some ugly houses
Like I said elsewhere, Buffalo is very conservative when it comes to new build residential architecture, despite the legacy of Wright, Sullivan, Richardson, etc. Local builders went all in on Staten Island-style neo-Med in the 1960s, and shed/cedar contemporary had a brief run in parts of Amherst through the 1970s, but MCM is still rare. A lot of the 1950s builder spec "MCM light" out there, especially in Tonawanda, got the "phony coloney" treatment in later years -- vinyl siding, fake shutters, and Bicentennial eagle over the garage door.

Even today, the Arts & Crafts/Craftsman revival trend noped past suburban Buffalo like an everywhere-else-in-America chain store with a cult following. Fast Casual multifamily is just now becoming a thing in the city proper, and there's very, very few new contemporary houses compared to peer metros. For the most part, it's still 1985 at the most recently developed edges of the suburban fringe.
 

WSU MUP Student

Cyburbian
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"1950s builder spec MCM light" seems to perfectly sum up the thought I was going for in my response to Whose Yur Planner's post.

There's definitely a lot of that around here in Metro Detroit too.

There is a neighborhood here named Bloomfield Village that was originally platted out in the 1920s. Like Dan's description of Lebrun drive, this would have been for the social register crowd who didn't want the hustle and bustle of the Grosse Pointes across town, the massive estate style lots of most of Bloomfield Hills at the time, or the small lots of Birmingham right next door. The subdivision is actually quite large at a few square miles and was developed in phases from the 1920s up into the 1950s. The Village is primarily large colonials and tudors but there is one chunk of land that must not have belonged to the original landowner and was developed separately and with different design standards (even today, the Village still has strict design "guidelines" on what can and cannot be done on a new build or remodel) and there are quite a few homes in there that are MCM or MCM light.

Some crappy photos from the neighborhood courtesy of the county's free property information.

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The houses above don't look particularly large but the smallest was about 3,500sqft with most being 4,500+. According to the metadata on the photos, most of the pictures were taken 15+ years ago. I run and drive through here a lot and it seems like there has been a lot of work done on these houses to clean them up and make some of the MCM features more prominent in the decade since we've lived nearby.

Here's one that's currently on the market:
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WSU MUP Student

Cyburbian
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9,759
Points
34
One more for today:

This one is down the street from my wife's aunt and uncle and is particularly special as it was the house that Minoru Yamasaki designed specifically for himself and his wife.

Minoru and Teruko Yamasaki House

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There were a bunch of pictures of the interior in the newspaper a few years ago but I cannot seem to find them now.
 

mendelman

Unfrozen Caveman Planner
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OMG I WANT THIS!!!! THIS IS WHAT I WANT!!!
Dittos. I love the onslaught of dramatic wall paper designs in the bathroom photos. Awesome!

This house needs to preserved inside and out as an example of pinnacle catalogue ~1959 interior design.
 

Luca

Cyburbian
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1,178
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I, too, am not instinctively a fan of this architectural style but I think that, generally, they still match contemporary lifestyles fairly well (programmatic suitability / utilitas)
In terms of ageing well or not, I think it's pretty well established that architectural styles go through a ife-cycle.
Some very old posters might recall my old tongue-in-cheek post about preference cycles.
By that standard, I would think that mid-century homes have already cycled through unfashionable / retrograde, past avant-garde / connected and are not entering aspirational (fashionable with ‘edgy’ media and trend-conscious public).
 
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