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Millionaires in da Hood

Seabishop

Cyburbian
Messages
3,838
Points
25
I used to work in Brockton, MA which is a down on its luck city of about 90,000 which is has been struggling for decades with poverty, crime, etc. As evidence of its toughness, its 2 biggest celebrities are/were boxing champs Rocky Marciano and Marvin Hagler. When I was there I read an article about what Hagler is doing now that he’s retired. The writer followed him around his mansion on the Italian coast and described all his millionaire stuff. The difference between the 2 settings was pretty interesting.

I’m sure you’ve also seen Cribs on MTV where rock stars and rappers show off their 10 jaguars and 100 acre estates. There are a lot of super-wealthy entertainers and athletes who come from poor neighborhoods. I’m not saying they shouldn’t enjoy their wealth, but how many of them actually contribute something back to the hood other than shout-outs and occasional visits to the local elementary school?
 

Zoning Goddess

Cyburbian
Messages
13,853
Points
39
Tiger Woods has a foundation that awards scholarships to students to attend college, or even specialized summer camps or other type of training. The idea is for kids to work thru a four-step process to figure out what they most want to do, then learn about it and do a project. It's competitive and the students have to do a lot of research and do community service.
 

SGB

Cyburbian
Messages
3,387
Points
25
Seabishop said:
[BThere are a lot of super-wealthy entertainers and athletes who come from poor neighborhoods. I’m not saying they shouldn’t enjoy their wealth, but how many of them actually contribute something back to the hood other than shout-outs and occasional visits to the local elementary school? [/B]
I've often thought a lot about this very idea. Imagine the potential......

Has anyone heard anything about how Magic Johnson's movie theater investment in the neighborhood formerly known as SouthCentral Los Angeles is doing? Ok, so he only created service jobs; at least he added (presumably) to the tax base.
 

LouisvilleSlugger

Cyburbian
Messages
216
Points
9
Here in Louisville, KY..Ali is help to make the Ali Center a reality..former U. of L. football star, Lyles, has put money towards a shppoing center on the West side of town as has NBA player Derek Anderson. there are some other local celebs doing things around town especially in the more African-American neighborhoods of the West End.
 

El Feo

Cyburbian
Messages
674
Points
19
Slugger, you're right, and it's not just sports stars - lots of celebs with connections to da 'Ville pump money into the arts - Actors Theatre, The Louisville Symphony, the Kentucky Center for the Arts, etc. Also, didn't John Schnatter put up a lot of money for the new football stadium? I know he got a sweet corporate naming deal out of it, but he actually footed most of the bill for it if I recall correctly. For a town of its size, I think Louisville has a fair amount of philanthropy coming out of its native sons and daughters.
 

Repo Man

Cyburbian
Messages
2,550
Points
25
Why do people always look at black celebs and athletes who come from poor neighborhoods and expect them to give back? What about those who started off middle-class or well-to-do and became a celeb or famous athlete? Shouldn't they be held in the same regard or have the same "social responsibility?"
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
Messages
10,080
Points
34
Repo Man said:
Why do people always look at black celebs and athletes who come from poor neighborhoods and expect them to give back? What about those who started off middle-class or well-to-do and became a celeb or famous athlete? Shouldn't they be held in the same regard or have the same "social responsibility?"
Good point, Repo. Not just for minorities, but for all people who are successful, is it their "duty" to give because of their living conditions when they were a child? Do they "owe" something? If I become a celebrity planner and sign a deal with Nike or Pepsi, do I then have to give something back to the 'hood of middle-class Glenview, where I was raised? Such things should not be expected. When they do happen, they should be appreciated.
 

Seabishop

Cyburbian
Messages
3,838
Points
25
Repo Man said:
Why do people always look at black celebs and athletes who come from poor neighborhoods and expect them to give back? What about those who started off middle-class or well-to-do and became a celeb or famous athlete? Shouldn't they be held in the same regard or have the same "social responsibility?"
I think rappers are the obvious target because they flaunt their wealth more than anyone but constantly talk about how where they came from and how tough it was. My comment was focused on helping the old neighborhood specifically not just donating to charities etc. The fact is that Glendale, WI probably doesn't need as much help as Compton.

Its not my place to dictate social responsibility and I don't think the government should seize Marvin Hagler's assetts for Brockton's redevelopment. I do get the sense though that most celebrities drive away from the old neighborhood in their Jaguars and never look back.
 

Repo Man

Cyburbian
Messages
2,550
Points
25
Seabishop said:
I think rappers are the obvious target because they flaunt their wealth more than anyone but constantly talk about how where they came from and how tough it was. My comment was focused on helping the old neighborhood specifically not just donating to charities etc. The fact is that Glendale, WI probably doesn't need as much help as Compton.
Kato Kaelin hasn't given back to Glendale and I am furious! :)

I actually think that most celebs don't turn their back on their neighborhood. I am always hearing about rappers giving back to the community through scholarships, donations, setting up foundations, businesses, etc. My point was that it seems that Black celebs and athletes are always ripped if they turn their back on their community while white actors are given a pass.
 

pete-rock

Cyburbian
Messages
1,551
Points
24
It's unrealistic to expect that most teenage and twentysomething athletes and entertainers will have the same level of social responsibility that is not developed in others until much later in life. Particularly for athletes and entertainers; they usually have been so selfishly focused on their sport/craft, trying to ensure that they make it big, that the idea of giving back comes much later. Wait until they are 40+ and no longer performing, then see what they do.

One other thing: real big money in sports and entertainment didn't come until the late '70s and early '80s. The ones who have made their moneyand retired since then have typically "given back" (like Magic, for one), but there will be more of it in a few years.
 

prudence

Cyburbian
Messages
688
Points
20
Repo Man said:
...Black celebs and athletes are always ripped if they turn their back on their community while white actors are given a pass.
White actors are too busy going on Hardline to criticize the Republicans...they don't have time for charities and other social causes...

Well, I'm off to the Thelma and Louise / Bull Durham double at the local bijou...
 

Mastiff

Gunfighter
Messages
7,181
Points
30
Keith Jackson, (Former TE Philadelphia Eagles), does a great deal of youth work in the Little Rock area...
 
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