• Ongoing coronavirus / COVID-19 discussion: how is the pandemic affecting your community, workplace, and wellness? 🦠

    Working from home? So are we. Come join us! Cyburbia is a friendly big tent, where we share our experiences and thoughts about urban planning practice, planning adjacent topics, and whatever else comes to mind. No ads, no spam, no social distancing.

Parking Minimum width of loading zone

SW MI Planner

Cyburbian
Messages
3,196
Points
27
Does your ordinance, or another source, list what is the minimum recommended width of a loading zone? An applicant is requesting a revision to an approved site plan that would reduce the loading zone from 12.5 feet to 9.5 feet wide in order to make the building larger.

The initial site plan had a 12.5 ft wide loading zone that ran parallel to the building, and was seperated from a service drive by 4' curbed islands. (The service drive also runs parallel to building and loading zone).

They are proposing to reduce the loading zone to 9.5 wide and no separation between it and the service drive.

I maintain that the loading zone has to be maintained separated from the service drive and that by allowing only 9.5 wide delivery trucks would extend into the drive. Now just looking for back up material - recommended width of loading zones, standard delivery truck widths, etc.

Thanks!
 

Joe Iliff

Reformed City Planner
Messages
1,435
Points
29
Most of the ordinances I have researched in the past six months have had loading zone minimum widths of 10, 12, and 15 feet, with 12 probably being the most common. 9½ wouldn't necessarily be awful, depending on what kind of trucks are expected to load & unload, and how easy it is to maneuver into the space from the drive. Having the loading zone in the service drive, so that a loading/unloading truck blocks the drive, kind of defeats the purpose of the zone, which is to get the truck out of everyone else's way.
 

Chet

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
10,590
Points
34
9.5 isnt the end of the world, but i like to see 15. All depends on the geometry
 

mendelman

Unfrozen Caveman Planner
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
15,230
Points
59
We require 10 feet wide as a minimum.

It might be ok to grant a variance if it is adjacent to a drive aisle that is 24 feet wide or more.
 

DPP

Cyburbian
Messages
146
Points
6
Here's my 2 cents...

Our bylaw asks for:
3.1 metres x 9.2 metres, maintaining a minimum overhead clearance of 4.3 metres throughout.

in feet, that's approx. 10'-2" x 30'-2" with clearance of 14'-1"

Ask to see a sweep path for typical vehicles on site, to ensure trucks can actually get in and out of the stall. (include clearance on either side of the sweep (we ask for 2 feet). If they're only using small trucks or vans, then a narrower width might work. If a mistake is made though, and the stall is unusable, then loading will take place somewhere easier. Like on the road, or in the drive aisle, causing problems.


Make sure that when a truck is using the loading area, that trucks on the drive aisles aren't blocked.

A narrow aisle may be an issue also if the trucks load from the side and a clear aisle is needed to move product into and out of the truck from the side, especially if a forklift or similar is required at-grade. The architect or building owner may not have thought of this.

Is the development planning on using the loading stall as the garbage pickup area? If so, make sure garbage trucks have enough clearance, including overhead clearance... and make sure the stall is clear of loading vehicles when it's garbage pickup time.
 

Richmond Jake

You can't fight in here. This is the War Room!
Messages
18,300
Points
44
Our jurisdiction has no loading standards. I pointed this out when we were adopting our land development regulations but my observation fell on deaf ears. :-s :r:
 

solarstar

Cyburbian
Messages
207
Points
9
10'x20' for those businesses that only have box-truck type deliveries (UPS, Fed Ex, etc.) 12'x60' for trailer-type deliveries.
 

JW Plans

Member
Messages
1
Points
0
Are there any publications or sources regarding the width of loading zones you all used to determine your standards? 12' seems high, I'm wondering if there are any publications siting the need.
 

Gedunker

Moderating
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
11,780
Points
46
My ordinance requires 12'-0" minimum width. It makes sense to me as most trailers (including box trucks) are 108" wide (9'-0") and lateral clearance to open hinged doors would seem obvious.
 

Maister

Chairman of the bored
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
29,608
Points
73
My ordinance requires 12'-0" minimum width. It makes sense to me as most trailers (including box trucks) are 108" wide (9'-0") and lateral clearance to open hinged doors would seem obvious.
What he said.
 
Top