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Mixed-Use Nightmare

OfficialPlanner

Cyburbian
Messages
948
Points
24
bloor-dundassquare.jpg


Nuff' Said
 

Suburb Repairman

moderator in moderation
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
7,495
Points
38
Jeez, it looks like a 60s Era public housing project with an office building facade on the bottom. I guess mixed-use isn't always the pretty new town center with lofts above a Starbucks or Abercrombie.
 

Jeff

Cyburbian
Messages
4,159
Points
27
I don't think the concept is bad, but the architecture is absolutely horrible.
 

JNA

Cyburbian Plus
Messages
26,965
Points
71
Jeff said:
I don't think the concept is bad, but the architecture is absolutely horrible.

Could not have had said it any better.
 

tsc

Cyburbian
Messages
1,900
Points
23
Well,, it is nice that the residential units have a balcony. If they just used the same building material/colors... it wouldn't have been so bad... it is like they ran out of money at the street level...or it looks like a bad photo shop project...
 

donk

Cyburbian
Messages
6,961
Points
31
Chet said:
Wheres the starbucks?

Closest one I could find is about 2 km / 1.2 miles away.

If the building is where I think it is (from the file description), it is not really a starbucks kind of neighbourhood.

Now if it was a Tim's on the other hand. ;)

(EDIT)

Here is the location of starbucks within a 5 mile radius.
getmap.aspx


(/EDIT)
 
Last edited:

PlannerGirl

Cyburbian Plus
Messages
6,370
Points
29
Im sorry that is butt ugly, very drab and unintresting on the street level.

Sigh this is why folks get a negitive idea of "mixed use".
 

Dan

Dear Leader
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
19,548
Points
71
Screams 1970s Toronto.

The stores face the street, the housing density is high, and other non-residential uses are incorporated. That's a good thing.

You have to remember, though, that during Toronto's boom years of the 1970s, brutalism was a very popular architectural style. From http://www.ontarioarchitecture.com/Brutalist.htm

Brutalism was a response to the glass curtain wall that was overtaking institutional and commercial architecture in the 1960s. The style originated in England but was quickly introduced to Ontario as it afforded an attractive and relatively inexpensive solution to weather and climate control conditions in large buildings, as well as a finish that was less vulnerable to vandalism.

The 1960s and 1970s were years of great expansion in universities and public buildings, and this is where the Brutalist style is most often found. The development of béton brut, a concrete with no formal finish, was intrinsically linked to this style. When the formwork is lifted from the poured concrete, the rough, naturally textured surface is the final finish. The amount of texture on the surface is dependent upon the amount of texture on the formwork. The smooth texture of glass for windows and doors forms an attractive contrast. Most windows in Brutalist buildings do not open and the buildings are thoroughly climate- controlled. The design of the building is largely dependant on the shape and placement of the various room masses. Outlines are quite intricate and exterior walkways are emphasized.
The building may seem unattractive to our early 21st century eyes, but in 50 years folks will be screaming to preserve it.
 

Planderella

Cyburbian
Messages
5,344
Points
31
That actually looks like 3 separate buildings, sort of one behind the other with the picture taken on an angle.
 

BKM

Cyburbian
Messages
6,461
Points
29
Very blah, but not any worse than 100,000 other buildings spread throughout the more "successful" cities of the continent (i.e., those that actually support "urban" densities).
 

Tranplanner

maudit anglais
Messages
7,943
Points
39
I don't mind some brutalist structures. I think this one is my fav:

Bruttor.jpg


Robarts Library, University of Toronto

It actually looks better from the other side.
 

donk

Cyburbian
Messages
6,961
Points
31
Tranplanner said:
I don't mind some brutalist structures. I think this one is my fav:

Bruttor.jpg


Robarts Library, University of Toronto

It actually looks better from the other side.

AKA, the Peacock.
 

Niyojak

Member
Messages
18
Points
1
And I was thinking that "Mixed use" of architectural vocabulary is being talked about. I am thankful that cyburbiaites enlightened me about its use!!... frankly think about the architect (or his compulsinons!!) to do this. In a pluralistic society, every body is free to stand alone. No body is appreciated for any comments whatsoever.
 

Chet

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
10,589
Points
34
donk said:
Am I one of the few people who like brutalism?

I dont dislike it, but Id probably get depressed if I had to live with it 24-7
 
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