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Mixed Use Zoning

Niyojak

Member
Messages
18
Points
1
I am looking for use classes permitted in low income residential settlements where mixed use residential-commercial zoning is to be done in an existing scheme. I would appreciate a practical example suitable for caribbean society. May post urls.
 

Rem

Cyburbian
Messages
1,523
Points
23
I'm not sure if I understand your request Niyojak, or whether the following is suited to the Caribbean but have a look here. The LEP is the statutory instrument and the DCP the design control guideline. The 3(1) and 3(2) zones are intended for mixed uses. Sections 3.3, 3.4 and 3.5 of the DCP probably give the most descriptive information.
 

Niyojak

Member
Messages
18
Points
1
Thanks. But I am looking for Uses which are not in residential land use classifications, that can be allowed in a Low income residential settlements which were developed purely residential without making provisions for any other use. Over a period of time due to natural process some non-residential uses have cropped up. So my concern is what uses could be permitted and what should be dis-allowed.
 

Rem

Cyburbian
Messages
1,523
Points
23
I see. I've never had to address the problem you describe, but was wondering whether it might be more useful for you to describe acceptable uses from the point of view of what you don't want - a prohibition list rather than permissable list. This could leave the door open for uses that you didn't contemplate when compiling the list. We have a definition of a 'home industry' in our older intruments that tries to exclude activities that might annoy the neighbours. It reads:

"home industry" means an industry carried on in a building (other than a dwelling-house or a dwelling in a residential flat building) under the following circumstances:
(a) the building does not occupy a floor space exceeding 50 square metres and is erected within the curtilage of the dwelling-house or residential flat building occupied by the person carrying on the industry oron adjoining land owned by that person; and
(b) the industry does not-
(i) interferes with the amentiy of the locality by reason of the emission of noise, vibration, smell, fumes, smoke, vapour, steam, soot, ash, dust, waste water, waste products or grit, oil or otherwise; or
(ii) involves exposure to view from any adjacent premises or from any public place of any unsightly matter; or
(iii) require the provision of any essential service main of a greater capacity than that available in the locality.
 

Niyojak

Member
Messages
18
Points
1
Yes. I suppose that is what is required to be done. It is a very peculiar situation where corrective measures are asked to be developed to amaend the past mistake. I'm greatful.
 
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