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Moving from Administration to Planning

Hawkeye66

Cyburbian
Messages
570
Points
20
Do you think this would be a difficult transition or change? I found planning to be my strength on the job. Land Use planning but also capital planning. Degrees were in admin and poli sci. I learned a lot over 20 years on the job. I just can't do admin anymore. The CV event I had convinced me to focus on what I like. I found after I came back from the leave that I had little desire to continue in administration. I dont care about money as long as its close.
 

Hink

OH....IO
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
15,452
Points
48
I would imagine the difficulty will be the questions of why. You likely could get interviews at a number of places, but the first question will be why. Why the lower pay, why the lower responsibility, why planning?

I want to move into administration, but am not willing to move outside of my geography of choice, so it will probably never happen. The few opportunities that I have had to move up and out of planning, the main questions are why. Your challenge likely won't be ability, but questions about motives and willingness to put in the work.

Good luck!
 

luckless pedestrian

Super Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
12,005
Points
48
I agree with hink but I think the answer has to be that you love that aspect of municipal/county/state government and then give a few tings about planning that you like and want to be doing more full time
 

Hawkeye66

Cyburbian
Messages
570
Points
20
How do you think it would be received if I said I want to focus on my strengths/what I like and want to reduce stress? Should I leave the stress part out?

I have two leads. One with an RPA and another with a private consulting firm. Is it unrealistic to expect that I might find joy and satisfaction in what I do?
 

luckless pedestrian

Super Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
12,005
Points
48
If you say you want to reduce stress by becoming the planner, we will laugh right out loud, right in the interview, so yes, don't say that

I think you should try it - if it's something that really is a goal, you should do it

Ask a lot of questions like:

What is a typical day like for someone in this postion?
What is the management style?
and ask to the interviewer - Why do you like working here?
 

Hawkeye66

Cyburbian
Messages
570
Points
20
If you say you want to reduce stress by becoming the planner, we will laugh right out loud, right in the interview, so yes, don't say that

I think you should try it - if it's something that really is a goal, you should do it

Ask a lot of questions like:

What is a typical day like for someone in this postion?
What is the management style?
and ask to the interviewer - Why do you like working here?
I realize its all relative, but trust me...the stress can't be worse than admin. Especially if there is no supervision.
 

MD Planner

Cyburbian
Messages
2,207
Points
31
It sounds to me that your issue is your workplace and not necessarily the job itself. To be honest, if you were looking to move from administration to planning and didn't have a LOT, and I mean a lot of tangible evidence that you can do serious planning work (since it's not really your education or background) I'd have to think long and hard about hiring you. And I don't know what you make right now but paying you close to the same amount would probably not happen either. Don't be afraid to look at another place. Not all administration jobs are that stressful.
 

Whose Yur Planner

Cyburbian
Messages
11,143
Points
37
Only if you are a minion will you escape management. if you get a PD gig, you're right back in it. Plus now you have to do both planning stuff and management. I have worn both hats for 22+years now. Make darn sure this is what you want to do.
 

Hawkeye66

Cyburbian
Messages
570
Points
20
It sounds to me that your issue is your workplace and not necessarily the job itself. To be honest, if you were looking to move from administration to planning and didn't have a LOT, and I mean a lot of tangible evidence that you can do serious planning work (since it's not really your education or background) I'd have to think long and hard about hiring you. And I don't know what you make right now but paying you close to the same amount would probably not happen either. Don't be afraid to look at another place. Not all administration jobs are that stressful.
Honestly its a bit of both. When my divorce happened 8 years ago I thought I would leave then and found people wouldn't pay me to do much else. I had a 5 year run in a job that was not too bad, then I took a new job that was closer to my kids. Brought back all the crap, plus some new crap.

I am giving interim administration on a full time basis serious consideration. You can speak freely and its more consulting really.
 
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