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Mr. Bill says "Ohh, nooo!!! - the coastal erosion!"

SGB

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Mr. Bill Tapped to Help Save La. Swamps
 

Rumpy Tunanator

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The campaign will be launched next summer with Mr. Bill and a gang of "Estuarians" - Salty the Shrimp, Eddy the Eagle, and others - talking about the shrinking coast.

-That's a good set of characters;)
 

mendelman

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What would a campaign like this accomplish? If they are trying to tell the children about coastal erosion, what the heck can kids do about a natural shifting of coastlines which has occurred for eons.

I know, they'll use Mr. Bill, Eddy the Eagle, et al to tell kids how to properly fill a sand bag and build an artificial barrier island. :p ^o)

Seems like a waste of money.
 

giff57

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mendelman said:
What would a campaign like this accomplish? If they are trying to tell the children about coastal erosion, what the heck can kids do about a natural shifting of coastlines which has occurred for eons.

I know, they'll use Mr. Bill, Eddy the Eagle, et al to tell kids how to properly fill a sand bag and build an artificial barrier island. :p ^o)

Seems like a waste of money.


Ahh, but that is a very old environmental tactic. It works extremely well for recycling. The kids learn something is bad, and they nag the parents into compliance. Also, they figure that when these kids grow up, they will have a good base of followers.
 

mendelman

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giff57 said:
Ahh, but that is a very old environmental tactic. It works extremely well for recycling. The kids learn something is bad, and they nag the parents into compliance. Also, they figure that when these kids grow up, they will have a good base of followers.

True, but recycling is something kids can do now.

How are they going to nag their parents into preventing/stopping the erosion of the land mass?

as for making future followers, I guess, but only if the kids come to understand whether this erosion is more naturally occurring, or because of increased human impacts/runoff.
 
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Dan

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Aound these parts, coastal erosion isn't considered an indicator of an impeding environmental disaster.

The Great Lakes are extremely young in geologic terms; maybe about 15,000 years old at the most. There are high bluffs along much of the south shore (or north coast, as it's called here in Ohio) of Lake Erie. Those bluffs are continually eroding, and expensive homes are constantly in danger of falling into the lake. However, erosion is part of the process of beach-building. As the bluffs erode, sand is added to the shoreline. When there is enough sand to absorb the energy of the pounding water, erosion will stop. There isn't much sand in the soil here, though, so Lake Erie still has a ways to go before it's finished, so to speak.

It's not global warming. It's not pollution. It's not George Bush, much as I hate to say it. It's geology, plain and simple. Erosion is a threat to expensive real estate, but bigger threats are pollution, invasive species, and illegal offshore sand dredging.
 
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