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Music you didn't like then, but like now

Doohickie

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There's a lot of music that was around when I was a kid, music I heard but it wasn't my music. Some of it I really like now. A few examples:

The Carpenters. In my youth they were nothing more than saccharine pop. But I've come to realize that Karen Carpenter might just have had the best voice in pop music in the 20th century

R&B in general. 50 years ago in my family, we just didn't listen to that music in our house. My dad was kind of Archie Bunker-ish that way. A couple songs that stand out:
This version is 11:45 long!

Gladys Knight likes to sing about how messy and complicated love can be. Deep stuff.



In Midnight Train, I'm fascinated by the call-and-answer between Gladys Knight and the backing chorus. The Pips are tight, precise, whether they are answering Gladys's call, providing almost instrumental backing to her words, or emulating a train whistle. Gladys is all over the place, obviously torn between her world and her man's world, whether to stay with what she knows or follow him into uncertainty. She sounds like she's almost crying, wailing, but the Pips hold her together. It's amazing to me how powerfully this song communicates the complicated emotions.

Both of these songs are good examples, I think, of the sacrifices women make for their men.

Anyway, what music is there from back in the day, that you didn't like then, but you do now?
 

Super Amputee Cat

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Not so much that I didn't like as much as indifferent to...

A lot of stuff by the Doors. When I first got into rock in the early 1980s, they were a little too hardcore for me. I especially didn't care for The End. But after seeing Apocalypse Now, I like the song a lot more, but it's been years since I've heard it.

Bob Seger, Against The Wind. I can sure relate to that song now, especially the line "...wish I didn't know now what I didn't know then." That is the perhaps quintessential line for my life for over 12 years now.
 

Doohickie

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OMG yes Bob Seger. His live album in the 70s was one of my first album purchases, but as he evolved, he was ahead of me. Against the Wind was a little too grown up for me. I listen to it now and I absolutely love it.
 

Super Amputee Cat

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The Motels - Suddenly Last Summer.

I was meh about the song when it first came out in 1983, but after seeing the video a few years later it actually enhanced my enjoyment of it. Usually I avoid videos because the visuals are contrary to what I want to conjure up in my mind when I'm listening to the song. But this video was so strange and fascinating that I've loved the song ever since.
 

Maister

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There were songs that merely 'registered' back in the 80's that I enjoy now as pure nostalgia. It's not that the songs have gotten any better or that I recognize musicianship that I somehow missed back then, it's simply that my associations and memories with them has grown more bittersweet with the passage of time. Songs like "Total Eclipse of the Heart," "Gloria," or Peter Schillings "Major Tom" to name a few of the more ham-handed examples.
 

Whose Yur Planner

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Suddenly Last Summer has always been one of my favorites. I've loved the dark undertones of the music at the end of the song. They contrast well with the wistful synth pop in the song. Maister, hope you don't mean Gloria by U2. The last half of that song is perhaps one the best 2-2 1/2 minutes of music there is. Y'all are going to have to post the songs if you are going to mention them.

I gained an appreciate for Baroque as I got older that I didn't have when I was younger,
 

Super Amputee Cat

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Night Ranger Sister Christian

I thought this song was merely OK when I first heard it in the Spring of 1984. But over the years it has really grown on me. It's not overplayed, like a lot of other '80s hits on those insufferable '80s retro shows - the bandwagon that all the pop stations seem to be jumping on these days. It's probably been at least six months since I've heard it.
 

TOFB

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Disco blasting outside my dorm room while I was inside, listening to Weather Report, smoking pot, wet towel guarding the threshold. Ohio Players were good.
 

Doohickie

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The last half of that song is perhaps one the best 2-2 1/2 minutes of music there is.

The jazzy jam starting at about 1:30 of Angry Eyes and going for 5 full minutes is a thing of beauty. When this song was originally popular they only played the ~3 minute single version. The extended version is some really good musicking.
 

TOFB

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The jazzy jam starting at about 1:30 of Angry Eyes and going for 5 full minutes is a thing of beauty. When this song was originally popular they only played the ~3 minute single version. The extended version is some really good musicking.
Oh yes this is one of my faves.

One more plug for the greatest alto of all time; I rest my case. Now back to Wayne Shorter.

Superstar
 
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Doohickie

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This showed up as a suggested video.... the music starts just before 2 minutes in. Seeing John Denver sing it live with Mama Cass is just so..... well it touches my heart and brings a tear to my eye.... the song is just so friggin' sweet.

 

michaelskis

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There was a lot of the classic rock music from the late 60's into the early 70's that I never really appreciated until the past few years. Now I have a ton of CCR, Stevie Wonder, Chicago, and Tower of Power, songs on my phone. Sure I played them in pep band in College, but never really appreciated the depth of them until now.
 

HomerJ

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I never used to be that big a fan of some of the 90s alternative/pop music like Massive Attack and somehow find myself listening to that now. Must have something to do with some sort of nostalgia for the 90s since I've found myself listening to The Cranberries more as well.

Going in the opposite direction though; when I was younger I really liked Sublime. Maybe I'm just at a different point in my life now, I just don't seem to enjoy listening to them anymore.
 

SlaveToTheGrind

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Well, seeing as I was born in 1971 and had a brother six years older who was into Led Zeppelin and The Who and so am I. But my music heyday was in the 1980s and metal is my go to listening pleasure. I did have a friend introduce me to county (Garth) so I now also listen to some county and includes Johnny Cash (great music) and Chris LeDoux. That would have never happened in my younger days.
 
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