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Natural Disasters and YOU!

What natural disaster have you experienced?

  • Hurricane

    Votes: 6 12.8%
  • Tornado

    Votes: 15 31.9%
  • Earthquake

    Votes: 6 12.8%
  • Volcano

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Flood

    Votes: 4 8.5%
  • Other

    Votes: 4 8.5%
  • Multiple Disasters

    Votes: 12 25.5%

  • Total voters
    47
  • Poll closed .

Zoning Goddess

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AIB my son, who this week had to pick a natural disaster for a school report. I am so proud, he picked Pompeii/Vesuvius (I am a closet archaeologist). In the meantime, I am reading a book about Florida hurricanes and wondering how Cyburbians have fared in natural disasters in their areas. I have been thru umpteen hurricanes, was a couple miles from a string of tornadoes that killed dozens just 6 years ago around here. My dad worked the Keys after a tornado in the '30's and reported picking up bodies from the sea with pitchforks. Hey, it's a Florida thing.

Which natural disasters have you/family experienced and how have you fared?

Mod Edit (nerudite): Added 'other' option.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

nerudite

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6,544
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I wanted to pick more than one, because I've been through a few things (couldn't figure out how to do that when editing a poll though). I have been around for tropical storms (not quite hurricanes), have been through tornado warnings (as of last year), lived through tons of earthquakes (San Fernando 1971, the Northridge quake, Loma Prieta from several miles away, and the list goes on), been evacuated for wildfires, had troubles with mudslides and have seen a waterspout in Hawaii. Oh yeah, and I got snowed in once during a blizzard in Tahoe.
 

Trail Nazi

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2,779
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24
Well, in the past year living here in this great Commonwealth called Virginia, both PG and I have experienced a blizzard, hurricane, and an earthquake. Although, the earthquake was very slight.

For me, snow is a natural disaster that I would prefer to avoid. Been through a number of tropical storms and hurricanes. I love them. Had the wildfire thing too. Don't really burrning things.
 

Cardinal

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I would also like to pick more than one option. I was around for hurricane Hugo in '89. I have been through seven tornados. I was called to duty for the floods of '92. I have been in Montana and Colorado when forest fires have raged these past few years. I have been in a couple minor earthquakes. There was the great Chicago blizzard of '67, and then again in about 1980. Add in sandstorms in the Saudi desert. I have survived them all. If there is a god, he has very poor aim.
 

Suburb Repairman

moderator in moderation
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I've been blessed with going through all of the listed disasters except for a volcano. Our family was the host house for many a huricane party when I was younger and lived near the coast. I've been through a couple of tornadoes when we lived up in North Texas (but not hit). We were hit pretty hard with the flooding in the Texas Hill Country back in 1998 and ended up with 5 feet of water in the house (we are NOT in the floodplain, our french drain failed). I went with my Dad on a business trip to San Francisco once and got to experience like a 4.9 earthquake, which has played a major role in me never wanting to live in Cali. I can handle anything else, but that whole ground-moving thing really bothers me 8-! !
 

JNA

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Growing up and family is still on a sand bar barrier island in NJ it was hurricanes.
When at Snowbird, UT spent time in the basement because of avalanches.

When in Breckenridge, Co I was on stand-by for body recovery after an avalanche.
tested for and qualified to be hired as professional ski patrol - went to grad school instead.
very knowledgeable about urban/wildland interface fire.

Now in IN I have experienced
earthquake - 5.0 M June 18, 2002;
flooding on the Ohio River 1997;
tornado - many watches and warnings - some sleepless nights - trained as a weather spotter.
 

Richmond Jake

You can't fight in here. This is the War Room!
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I rode out the Loma Prieta 'quake when I was in California. Fortunately, not too much damage to our house (the after shocks, which we could actually hear before we felt, were the most disturbing). I also worked in the EOC for the nearly annual county flooding.

OT: ZG, did you receive my response?
 

AubieTurtle

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894
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Being that I grew up in central Alabama, I've been through more tornado warnings than I can count. There were a couple of close calls but luckily nothing worse than fallen trees.

Most of the hurricanes I've been through were somewhat weakened by the time they made it up to Montgomery, though I was in Mobile for a pretty big one.

The only earthquake I've been through was the Northridge quake (6.8). That was pretty crazy. It damaged Cal State Northridge quite a bit but the students had a good sense of humor about... when the school reopened they handed out bumper stickers that said "CSUN: Not just back, better" but it didn't take long for some smart student to discover you could fold it to read "CSUN: just beer" :)

I've never had a house I lived in flood but I've seen the water get high enough on the Alabama River that some of the interstate exists were being used as boat launches.

Volcanos? Well, I haven't had the pleasure of that experience yet but who knows... they don't call this place Hotlanta for nothing.
 

PlannerGirl

Cyburbian Plus
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6,377
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Man I wish I could pick more than one
Flood
mudslides
ice storms
earth quakes
tornados (by far the thing that scares me the most)
hurricanes
blizzards
wildfires
oh yes and soon the brood X ;-)
 

Plannerbabs

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Nothing too exotic here, just floods (my car had water up to the tops of the wheel wells; when it got below the muffler, I got in, hoping to put it in the garage where it should have been, and it started right up, no problems :-D ), ice storms that knock power out for days, and countless tornado watches and warnings, including one that went a few miles southeast of my house and did millions of dollars of damage a few years ago.
 

mendelman

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Mostly just massive hailstorms and extremely large snowstorms.


I'm glad I don't haven't had to deal with earthquakes, hurricanes, tornadoes, etc.
 
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giff57

Corn Burning Fool
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Blizzards
Icestorms
Floods
Tornadoes

One close call with a tornado, the weather was pretty bad, but no warning was issued. I was looking out of this huge window when an office chair dropped from the sky and smashed on the sidewalk outside. It did not take long to figure out that the chair was once inside a building and that I should move. The building I was in was not hit but one was destroyed 1/2 block away.
 

NHPlanner

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I was at football camp my senior year of highschool when Hurricane Bob hit NH....not a fun day (though we didn't have to practice that day. ;-) )
 

boiker

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-a couple of 20" blizzards (i know, In Buffalo, 20" causes only minor problems ;-) )

-a couple tornados, as I am currently certified storm spotter and in college a frequent storm chaser.

-In '95, I experienced the three day stint of 125-135 degree heat indicies that killed 600 in Chicago.

-tiny 3.0 - 4.0 earthquake in Northern Illinois
 

Seabishop

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I've been lucky - just a few minor hurricanes here (Bob, Gloria). We do have the potential to get whacked though, the last really bad one was in the 50's, when a neighborhood in the city I work in was very seriously flooded leading to the great urban renewal of the 70's.

Maybe our New Orleans members know the details, but isn't the city expected to be in serious trouble if they get a bad hurricane?
 

pete-rock

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Probably the scariest natural disaster for me was the Plainfield (southwest 'burbs of Chicago) tornado in 1990. That tornado blew up a high school, destroyed many homes, killed about 20 people and had me shaking in my basement.

Also, the Chicago heat wave of 1995. A lot of Southerners dismiss this event, but I've been in Alabama and Georgia in July and August many times, and I've been to Phoenix and Vegas in the summer, too, but the heat and humidity in Chicago for that week in July was much worse. I remember it topping out at 106 degrees, with 80%-plus humidity. And this in a city where AC is not standard.
 

otterpop

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I grew up in south Louisiana, so I am well acquainted with hurricanes. I've also sat out a few tornado warnings when I lived in Mississippi. Few years ago I was in Helena when we had a minor earthquake. Man, I must be bad luck!
 

boiker

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[ot] Meteorologically speaking, the midwest can have some of the highest air moisture contents in the country. The reason is agricultural aspiration. Corn releases more moisture into the air daily than an open pool of water. Frequently, during the summer, the corn will aspire so much that the dewpoints (measure of moisture in the air) in the midwest will be 5-15 degrees higher than the gulf coast or southeast communities. In 1995, the dewpoint was between 82-85 degrees. A normal summertime gulf area dewpoint is in the 70-80 degree range, which is still exceptionally sticky and uncomfortable.

Like pete said, in Chicago it was 106... I was in the middle of a cornfield (LaSalle County) when that happened the air temp was 108, the dewpoint was 83 and the heat index was reportedly 130'ish during the afternoon hours.[/ot]
 
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Although there's been a couple of close calls, the last hurricane to hit N.O. was around 1965 (before my time). I've been through tropical storms and severe floods.
 

Gedunker

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PlannerGirl said:
Man I wish I could pick more than one
Flood
mudslides
ice storms
earth quakes
tornados (by far the thing that scares me the most)
hurricanes
blizzards
wildfires
oh yes and soon the brood X ;-)

What she said, except the mudslides and wildfires. The earthquake was quite mild, although our city is in the "widespread damage" zone for the New Madrid fault line.

I hate cicadas, so the brood X arrival in 7 weeks is going to freak me out 8-!
 

tsc

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...you forgot Blizzard!! :-D

Blizzards, floods, hurricanes... and oh yes... a nasty heat wave when I was in Greece in 1988 (killed 500 people) and we ran out of water.
 
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31
Seabishop said:
Maybe our New Orleans members know the details, but isn't the city expected to be in serious trouble if they get a bad hurricane?

Yep....if anything above a Category 3 directly hits the city, it will be under water for weeks. There are only 2 ways out of the city and one route is prone to severe flooding - 12 foot dip under a railroad bridge. The best way to evacuate is to leave 2-3 days before the hurricane is predicted to hit, but in reality, not too many people can afford to do that. The last time we were threatened with a direct hit was back in '98 with Hurricane Georges. A lot of people tried to leave town that morning and were stuck in gridlock. My family decided to stay and ride out the storm. Fortunately, it turned at the spur of the moment and hit Mobile instead.
 

tsc

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the blizzard of 93 was pretty bad. I agree though...snow just piles up and northerners are really used to it. 93 was pretty wild though...since we got close to 30 inches all at once.
 

Mud Princess

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Oh yeah, I almost forgot about the Blizzard of 1993. My boss at the time freaked out because people were actually LATE to work!
 

ludes98

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tsc said:
the blizzard of 93 was pretty bad. I agree though...snow just piles up and northerners are really used to it. 93 was pretty wild though...since we got close to 30 inches all at once.

Well I was in a blizzard in 1982 in Colorado. I guess they can be natural disasters due to property damage and snow can cause carbon monoxide build up and death. Found this website with a summary of bad blizzards in Colorado. The Coloradoan. Most expensive storm in Colorado according to insurance claims: HAIL in Denver 1990.
 

Chet

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2 tornados
1 hurricane
1 minor earthquake
too many blizzards to remember the #
 

Dragon

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750
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Several Hurricanes
More Tropical Storms
A few tornados, and many warnings
And a few floods.

The weather hasn't run me off yet. I dread the heat/humidity combo in the summer more then a Hurricane any day.
 

giff57

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ludes98 said:
Where is NONE? I was in a blizzard but I wouldn't consider it a natural disaster.


Then it wasn't much of a blizzard now was it. ;-)
 

Gedunker

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We are coming up on the 20th anniversary of the Super Outbreak of 1974

April 3-4, 1974: Super Outbreak
There were an amazing 148 tornadoes over 13 states in the South and Midwest! This is the largest known outbreak for the United States. The deadliest tornado hit Xenia, Ohio, killing over 34 people and doing $100 million in damage. The total number of deaths was 350, and there was $600 million in damage.

Mrs. G was nine yrs old, playing at a neighbors when her mom hurriedly brought her home. She remembers the sky being deep green and the proverbial "freight train". The tornado passed about 1.5km south of her.
 

ilikefish0

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204
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Planderella said:
Yep....if anything above a Category 3 directly hits the city, it will be under water for weeks. There are only 2 ways out of the city and one route is prone to severe flooding - 12 foot dip under a railroad bridge. The best way to evacuate is to leave 2-3 days before the hurricane is predicted to hit, but in reality, not too many people can afford to do that. The last time we were threatened with a direct hit was back in '98 with Hurricane Georges. A lot of people tried to leave town that morning and were stuck in gridlock. My family decided to stay and ride out the storm. Fortunately, it turned at the spur of the moment and hit Mobile instead.

I wonder if they'll ever get the giant pumps working to drain that dip. Amazingly enough, since betsy, New orleans has escaped huricanes by near misses several times. Andrew, Georges, and several others have turned at the last minute and avoided the city. I do remember several floods, though--the worst was on may 8, 1995 (is the year right?). We had two feet of rain overnight, and that resulted in two feet of water in the house. Places that had never flooded before flooded in that storm. It was bizarre.
 
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ilikefish0 said:
I do remember several floods, though--the worst was on may 8, 1995 (is the year right?). We had two feet of rain overnight, and that resulted in two feet of water in the house. Places that had never flooded before flooded in that storm. It was bizarre.

Yep! I remember that flood vividly. What saved me from getting caught in it and losing my car was that I stayed home from work that night so that I could study for my final exam the next morning. The city was shut down for a few days after that flood.
 

Dragon

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Planderella said:
Yep....if anything above a Category 3 directly hits the city, it will be under water for weeks. There are only 2 ways out of the city and one route is prone to severe flooding - 12 foot dip under a railroad bridge. The best way to evacuate is to leave 2-3 days before the hurricane is predicted to hit, but in reality, not too many people can afford to do that. The last time we were threatened with a direct hit was back in '98 with Hurricane Georges. A lot of people tried to leave town that morning and were stuck in gridlock. My family decided to stay and ride out the storm. Fortunately, it turned at the spur of the moment and hit Mobile instead.

George did a good number to the MS Gulf Coast as well.

Part of the evacuation route for New Orleans (I-59) puts you guys up here with us. Hurricane Party?
 

Big Easy King

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Planderella said:
Yep....if anything above a Category 3 directly hits the city, it will be under water for weeks. There are only 2 ways out of the city and one route is prone to severe flooding - 12 foot dip under a railroad bridge. The best way to evacuate is to leave 2-3 days before the hurricane is predicted to hit, but in reality, not too many people can afford to do that. The last time we were threatened with a direct hit was back in '98 with Hurricane Georges. A lot of people tried to leave town that morning and were stuck in gridlock. My family decided to stay and ride out the storm. Fortunately, it turned at the spur of the moment and hit Mobile instead.

New Orleans is so far below sea level that it would essentially become a soup bowl if a Category 3 or above hurricane would hit. It's only a matter of time before another big one hits like Camille did back in the late 1960s.
 

JNA

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ludes98 said:
Most expensive storm in Colorado according to insurance claims: HAIL in Denver 1990.

Forgot to add that to my list, I was at UCD that summer.
 

steveanne

Member
Messages
176
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7
Ice Storms and Blizzards in Rochester, NY... Yet schools never seemed to close.

2 Tornados in Edinboro, PA - scariest of the storms I've been in. ("Hey guys, come look out the window! You can see the wind!")

Dodged a hurricane in Orlando, FL (Hey, they closed down Disney and never even got a drop of rain!)

Flooding in Des Plaines, IL More of a nuissance than anything.
 

SkeLeton

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Hmmm.. natural disasters? none... that I remember... Here in Chile.. I haven't had nothing but a few ground shakes, but no earthquakes (well after 1960.. nobody wants one), floods are unusual where I live and although, floods are frequent in Santiago (concrete doesn't absorb water, dummies!), but not where I study or live.

Ok, maybe I could be forgetting the winters in the US where I believe in 1991 schools where closed for a few days... but that wasn't any disaster for a kid my age at that time :p
 

Rumpy Tunanator

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tsc said:
93 was pretty wild though...since we got close to 30 inches all at once.

That's not a blizzard, now this is a blizzard;)
 
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el Guapo said:
Mod Edit - added multiple disasters. I hope that was Ok. :)
It is okay with me if you will also change my vote form "earthquake" to "multiple disasters". Or not. Read on and judge for yourself if the earthquake is the only one that really counts:

We drove betwixt 2 blizzards crossing the country from Washington state to Georgia.

Our house was 3 blocks from the evacuated are of Manhattan, KS in the Great Flood of 93.

I was in Southern Cali for the 7.1 earthquake in, um, the fall of '99. It was surprisingly not very damaging. It happened out in the middle of nowhere (which is why I was in it :-D ) and there were some additional mitigating factors. On striking one that I remember is that a passenger train got derailed but there were no deaths, just a few relatively minor injuries. The reason: it would normally have been going a lot faster across the flat, empty expanse of the desert but it was scheduled behind a slower-moving freight car. If it had been going as fast as it normally would have travelled through there, people would have died.

I think there was one death attributed to that quake: someone died of a heart attack.

For me, the Big Deal was that it occurred at the beginning of Midterms week and was followed by hundreds of aftershocks in the next couple of weeks, some of them up around 4.something on the Richter scale. I had enormus difficulty sleeping. Gee: you think maybe I can blame my A minus in Law that quarter on The Big Quake??? :-} (Probably not: I think I also made an A minus in the other required law class the next quarter, while taking fewer credit hours and not having any earthquakes. Law is just not my strong suite. :) )
 

GRID

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Zoning Goddess -- I also have such an interest in hurricanes and tornadoes. I study them a lot. I cannot believe your dad was in the 30's Keys storm! That was a rare Category 5! I'm sure you've seen the book "Storm of the Century" which was written on that hurricane.

With all my interest in natural disasters, I have only really been in multiple tornado warnings back where I grew up in Omaha, NE. In 1989, there actually was a small tornado that hit miles away (that I never saw). Being down in Florida, I am excited about hurricane season coming up.

I did feel a small quake when I was out in LA. And, I've been in some blizzards (including the 2nd worst blizzard to ever hit Denver, CO). In the early 90's, I experienced the great floods of the Midwest. That is about all.
 

Zoning Goddess

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GRID said:
Zoning Goddess -- I also have such an interest in hurricanes and tornadoes. I study them a lot. I cannot believe your dad was in the 30's Keys storm! That was a rare Category 5! I'm sure you've seen the book "Storm of the Century" which was written on that hurricane.

I just finished reading Neil Franks "Florida's Hurricane History" which details every hurricane known to have struck FL up thru Andrew. He's the director of the Nat Hurricane Center who I remember best, with his weirdly Marine haircut. Lots of good photos.

My dad was in college at Univ of FL when the Keys hurricane hit, and with his older brother and some fraternity brothers, headed to the Keys to volunteer. He never told us the story until a few years before he died. He thought it was too gruesome.
 

Bear Up North

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2005 Update

Re-opening an old thread in honor of soon-to-be-experienced springtime weather. In fact, some southerners have already had some severe storms. Just a matter of time before tornadoes hit and do the damage thing.

TORNADOES
Many years ago in suburban Milwaukee, WI, my dad said, "Hey, kids, look out the front door....it's a tornado." I don't really recall seeing a funnel or anything, just a lot of dark, swirling clouds. (Oh, almost forgot....a witchy-looking old lady on a bike, with a little dog in the bike's basket, was in the clouds.)

A couple twisters roared through metro Toledo back in 1965, killing about thirteen (13) people and destroying hundreds of homes. President Johnson flew into town and toured the wreckage, which was a neighborhood just north of mine. Did not get to see either tornado, although we heard the big road as they went over us.

On July 4th, I think 1968, a tornado did some limited damage to the Toledo area. I was at a bar with a friend and saw nothing. Same thing in summer of about 1988, and again I was at a bar and when the sirens went off we all raised our glasses and toasted the "gods of the storm". :-c

EARTHQUAKE
In the mid-1970's I was listening to a Detroit Tiger game on the radio and my window started to shake. The announcers on the radio said, "Hey, the booth is shaking." It was a northern Ohio earthquake that rattled windows.

BLIZZARD
I have been in blizzrd conditions in the Upper Peninsula....and still managed to join my friends at a local pub. NW Ohio had a big blizzard in 1978. A number of people died in the storm, becoming disoriented as they tried to move from one 91) form building to another. The army (national guard) was called out to help clear roads.

Not much else for this Bear, in the way of natural disasters. I am a bit nervous about my son and his family, moving to Portland, OR, this summer. Mount St. Helen's isn't the concern.....earthquakes are. Small concern, using the logical non-beer-drinking side of my brain.....but still a concern.

Totobear
 
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I've been snowed/iced in at home for up to a week at a time - but still wouldn't call that a natural disaster on par with a hurricane or tornado or tsunami. I think for me, magnitude of property damage is a major "natural disaster" indicator. Aside from utility pole damage. :)
 

Jaxspra

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Lots of tornado warnings but have never really seen one...
Also a flash flood, rained about 14 inches over a few hours a few years back...it was crazy what the water did to foundations of homes and buildings...I lost my car to the flood..otherwise nothing too exciting...
 

zman

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2 tornadoes (one in Denver and one in Memphis) Pretty scary to a little boy ZmanPLAN to hear the sirens...

I was a number of blizzards in Denver, including the one in 1982 (I don't remember though), the one in 97, and the one in '03 with four feet.

There was a slight earthquake south of Denver on Christmas in the mid 90s, but no big deal.

Fires are numerous in the mountains including a huge one near the family cabin two summers ago and then a fire south of Denver last year near my folks' house.
 
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