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New APA Publication - The Practicing Planner

Repo Man

Cyburbian
Messages
2,549
Points
25
The APA has released a new online quarterly called "The Praticing Planner." Has anybody read this yet? I glanced at some of the articles but I haven't had a chance to fully check it out. From what I understand it is only available to those with their AICP certification. Has anyone without their AICP tried to look at it yet? I think that if they are blocking access to those without their AICP, it is extremely unfair. It is like they are trying to say that if you don't have your AICP you aren't a real planner and you shouldn't have access to these articles. That is complete b.s. With every piece of junk mail and e-mail they send me, I get more and more annoyed with the APA.
 

el Guapo

Capitalist
Messages
5,995
Points
31
Who does not wear the AICP ribbon?



For a bit of irony check out the sign behind the boys. ;)
 

NHPlanner

A shadow of my former self
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
9,930
Points
40
jtfortin said:
I think that if they are blocking access to those without their AICP, it is extremely unfair. It is like they are trying to say that if you don't have your AICP you aren't a real planner and you shouldn't have access to these articles. That is complete b.s. With every piece of junk mail and e-mail they send me, I get more and more annoyed with the APA.
Yes, it is blocked for non-AICP members. The Practicing Planner is a replacement for another "only-AICP" publication called the Planners Casebook. It's one of the few additional benefits you get from being AICP. APA is trying to save money, so instead of mailing the Casebook, there's the Practicing Planner available on the web for AICP'ers. I can understand the frustration...but don't worry....you're not missing much.
 

H

Cyburbian
Messages
2,850
Points
24
I was just discussing the AICP over the weekend, and whether or not to take (spend the money for) the test. Is it worth it? What does it get me? I would rather spend the money on something more productive like a canoe trip. To follow in the Wendy's tradition…”Where’s the validity?!”

They seem to be a club that accepts almost anyone who can pay.

I have not seen the new magazine, but then according to them, I am not a “practicing planner”.

Ps. that is a great post El Guapo!
 

Repo Man

Cyburbian
Messages
2,549
Points
25
I have my AICP certification, so I can access it, I just think (after glancing at it) that anyone who pays APA dues should be able to read these articles. I have said it before: I think that the APA is far more concerned with selling stuff (conferences, books, seminars, etc) than providing members with things that will help them as professional planners. I saw a list of the recomended readings for the AICP exam and the total cost for all items was over 600 bucks. Not surprisingly, the readings were all "Planners Book Service" items. Look at the APA website, 90 percent of the content is them trying to sell stuff to members.
 
Messages
5,352
Points
31
Hmmm....since one of the AICP's code of ethics say something about helping other planners in the profession, perhaps one of the esteemed AICP members should share their members-only literature with those planners who are not so fortunate to be a member of the few but not-necessarily proud certified planners. ;)
 

Chet

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
10,623
Points
34
Funny, I can't see it but don't feel the pervasive sense of loss.
 

Mud Princess

Cyburbian
Messages
4,898
Points
27
jtfortin said:
I have said it before: I think that the APA is far more concerned with selling stuff (conferences, books, seminars, etc) than providing members with things that will help them as professional planners.
One of the many reasons why I let my membership run out last year. Spending almost 200 bucks a year brought me lots of junk mail, but not much else ... unless you count Planning magazine. You don't even get that much of a discount on conference registration.
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
Messages
10,080
Points
34
Huston said:
I was just discussing the AICP over the weekend, and whether or not to take (spend the money for) the test. Is it worth it? What does it get me? I would rather spend the money on something more productive like a canoe trip. To follow in the Wendy's tradition…”Where’s the validity?!”
I'm in the same boat. There are, unfortunately, too many people out there that want to see the credential when hiring. It does not mean that those four letters make someone a better planner, or the lack of them means that the person person in question can't plan. Employers use it as a screening mechanism, rather than looking at a person's career, talking to their references, or examining their past work. Damned shortcuts! Grrrr!

Note: I recently got a response from a consulting firm saying that while they were impressed with my qualifications as an economic / community developer, they were looking for someone with more of a planning background. I say this as I look up from my morning's work, trying to redesign a proposed subdivision to better fit into an infill neighborhood site. If the AICP planner who put it together was so good, why am I correcting his work? Better yet, if I don't have the qualifications, how is it I can identify the problems and come up with the solutions?
 
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