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New Tour Guide Out: Visit North Korea!

Would you visit North Korea, if given the chance?

  • Yes - It would be interesting to see and quite an experience, albeit a scary one.

    Votes: 5 20.8%
  • Yes - Once there I bet I could see what Ameica would be like under Glorious President Hillary.

    Votes: 1 4.2%
  • Yes - Once there I bet I could see what Ameica would be like under Glorious President Bush & Able Le

    Votes: 4 16.7%
  • Yes - Once there I could establish an APA outreach program with like minded planners - All hail the

    Votes: 1 4.2%
  • Undecided - First tell me about the nightlife and art scene. Is it open to fabulous tourists?

    Votes: 1 4.2%
  • Undecided - Would my WiFi Palm Manzingo work, and where are the Pyongyang Starbucks?

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Neutral - Maybe, but I'd be really cautious and careful.

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Neutral - I just dont know, or I have another opinion listed below.

    Votes: 2 8.3%
  • No - Not enough anal retentiveness there, I prefer Switzerland.

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • No - I'm afraid the Glorious Leader would enchant me.

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • No - I'd open my big mouth and spend the rest of my life as a Pyongyang labor camp princess.

    Votes: 3 12.5%
  • Other - I'm Canadian, if they had good beaches and cigars, I could overlook the slave labor camps li

    Votes: 1 4.2%
  • Other -I'm posing from there now!

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Other - I'm from the APA and we are watching you Cyburbia punks real careful like, got it?

    Votes: 6 25.0%

  • Total voters
    24

el Guapo

Capitalist
Messages
5,995
Points
31
Q. What is the antonym of Las Vegas?
A. Pyongyang

It's safe to say that no country in the world is more dangerous or more shrouded in mystery than North Korea, but some people would like to see it all the same. And yet, until last month, North Korea was just about the only country in the world without a travel guide. (There hasn't been one to hell since Dante.) While only about 3,000 Westerners a year manage to finagle a visa into--and, more important, out of--North Korea, everyone would benefit from the new Bradt Travel Guide's chapters on the country's rich history and on the psychology of a government that makes Saddam Hussein's regime look enlightened.

The guide, written by British journalist Robert Willoughby, sometimes twists itself into knots to be judicious, but when it comes to politics Mr. Willoughby can be quite candid: "Remember that this guide is only useful in the country if it's allowed in, so what I haven't explicitly written about I've included [Internet] links to." Among the best is the human-rights work of Norbert Vollertsen, a German doctor who was expelled from North Korea in 2001 and has just written a book on what he saw there (to be published next month by Encounter).

Even with its pulled punches, the book does a mind-bending job of describing the personality cult that surrounds the late dictator Kim Il Sung ("the Great Leader") and his son and successor Kim Jong Il ("the Dear Leader"). The guide laconically notes that tourists will "be asked to 'pay respect' to statues and shrines" of the two men. "Just do it" is its terse advice....
Read the rest at: http://www.opinionjournal.com/taste/?id=110004528

[Wanagas?]Pyongyang Pretty[/Wanagas?]
 

Bear Up North

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
9,329
Points
31
There was a special, a few weeks ago, on CNN. A reporter and a camerman spent some time in the DMZ, in the buildings (built as "temporary" buildings in the early 1950's) that the two (2) Koreas use to watch and talk with each other.

There was a small patch of concrete and stone between two (2) of the buildings. In the middle was a line. You could see the North Korean sentry, staring continually....an evil stare. The South Koreans did the same. Evidently, both countries assign their tallest (and strongest and toughest looking) soldiers to this sentry duty. Show of strength OR both countries out of touch with a world that needs to get better. (Lottsa other countries and peoples out of touch, in other places.)

I would go there, nervously. Heck, in my business I deal with crybaby employees all day long. I need a dividing line with a DMZ, too.

Bear
 

Zoning Goddess

Cyburbian
Messages
13,852
Points
39
Nah, I'd be the big-mouth labor camp princess, a clear demotion from goddess. Guess I'll just go someplace else where they don't like us Americans, like France.
 

nerudite

Cyburbian
Messages
6,544
Points
30
As long as I'd have a guide, I'd go. I went to Egypt right after several bombings in 1995... I felt completely safe with my police escort... even when I was 10 miles outside of Lybia in the middle of the Sahara Desert. Bring on the adventure!
 

Tranplanner

maudit anglais
Messages
7,903
Points
35
I agree with nerudite - I'd go if I had a good guide. Apparently they have a subway system that only runs when they want to impress foreign visitors.
 

BKM

Cyburbian
Messages
6,463
Points
29
Given limited time, and limited money, there are about 10,000 other places I would rather see first. I guess I'm not very adventurous, but I'd rather see an attractive, "successful" country. Send me to Italy or Holland instead!
 

SkeLeton

Cyburbian
Messages
4,853
Points
26
North Korea, along with countries like Cuba, Bolivia, Venezuela, Turkmenistan, Myanmar, China and other countries alike are the countries I'd never ever set a foot on. There are many reasons to avoid those countries; little to none civil liberties, corrupt goverments, etc...
 

donk

Cyburbian
Messages
6,970
Points
30
SkeLeton said:
There are many reasons to avoid those countries; little to none civil liberties, corrupt goverments, etc...
Guess you won't be visiting Canada or the US anytime soon either.
 

The Irish One

Member
Messages
2,267
Points
25
You can't go to North Korea without a 24 hour guide, no exceptions to the rule. If you are a citizen of the USA, forget about going, you'll never get a visa. You can only enter North Korea by train from China (I think). When you take the train you get to see the barren countryside where the people suffer endlessly for the sake of the loyal in Pyonyang.

When you enter Pyongyang you are expected to bow on hand and knee to a statue of Kim Il Sung and it is considered courteous to bring flowers to the statue.

Foreigners only stay at one hotel in North Korea (Pyonyang)and you are assigned a tour giude by the government, any straying without your tour guide will be a quick trip back to China and potentially lethal for the guide.

Bring your giude chocolate, liquor and cigarettes!

THE SUBWAY
Previous visitors have suspected the government to set up situations to impress the visitor. For instance, let's say you want to visit the subway, amazingly as you arrive there will be a crowd of handsomely dressed people getiing on and off the subway, all are busy, perfectly dressed and on their way.
 

JNA

Cyburbian Plus
Messages
25,576
Points
59
I agree with BKM!
I have only been to Canada, but only as child.

Have not been to all 50 states either yet,
so why would I want to go to NK,
when I haven't been to .....
 
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