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New York University 🇺🇸 New York University (NYU) thread

johnk

Member
Messages
1
Points
0
Hi,

I'm a rising senior at NYU's Gallatin School of Individualized Study, where my concentration involves the relationship of people with the built environment through history, and representations of urban form in film and literature. I'm wondering whether my interdisciplinary, liberal arts program makes me a strong or weak candidate for the MUP programs at MIT, Harvard, Columbia, Berkeley, and UCLA. My GPA is around a 3.75 right now, and will likely be a bit higher by the time I apply in January. I have taken a good amount of social science and urban design studies courses, which have helped me form my concentration. Some of my more relevant courses for MUP prep have been:

Shaping the Urban Environment
Economics Principles I
Cities, Communities, and Urban Life
Cities in Global Context
Urban Design and The Law
Black Urban Studies
Modern Architecture: 1914-Present

I would have taken practical courses in architecture/planning, but NYU has nothing to offer in those areas.While I am interested in looking at cities from the perspectives I've studied as an undergrad, I want to merge that with the more practical skills I would gain in an MUP program, and potentially enter a Ph.D program after an MUP program.

Do I have a decent shot at any of these schools?
 

DetroitPlanner

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
6,241
Points
27
I can't say much about those specific schools but a liberal arts program with strong links to geographic, economic, or political classes is a definite asset.
 

IHeartFlorida

Member
Messages
2
Points
0
Anyone else beginning Master's studies at NYU in spring? I'm moving up there from Florida in January...excited about the program and the city. I'd love to meet anyone else that might be starting such an adventure...
 

urbangrit

Member
Messages
6
Points
0
Hey!

I'm certainly thinking about it. I got an extension for the replying deadline because I'm waiting on word from Rutgers. I really enjoyed my visit to NYU though. Great area, some interesting on-campus opportunities, and the ability to take more technical classes at NYU Poly all got me interested. I'm a transportation guy, btw. I'm trying to decide between NYU, Hunter, and potentially Rutgers at the moment.

What are you looking to specialize in?
What drew you to the program?
What other programs did you look at?
 

IHeartFlorida

Member
Messages
2
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0
I'm going to be specializing in housing policy. I also applied (and was accepted) to Hunter and Florida State here in FL. My goal was always to attend grad school in NYC, so that played a major role in my choice of NYU. Their faculty, particularly Ms. Gould-Ellen, also contributed to the choice. NYU's location and collection of distinguished professorial staff made it the most attractive school, in my opinion.
 

pburgois

Member
Messages
3
Points
0
Just out of curiosity what was the deadline on accepting or turning down the offer at Hunter? Thanks.
 

urbangrit

Member
Messages
6
Points
0
Originally, it was November 19th. I got an extension to December 3rd though.
Are you on the waiting list? If so, I can try to hurry up.. ha. I'm having difficulty deciding though.
 

pburgois

Member
Messages
3
Points
0
Yeah, I'm on the waiting list. I was just trying to figure out, however roughly, what the timeline looks like.
 

jeanne

Member
Messages
1
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0
Do you need to take the GRE . I am a great writer, but I stink in MAth and in taking these types of tests. I do great in school work. I started a Master's Degree in Social Work at a private college. I have received A's in all the classes. I do not care to complete this degree though. I don't love. it. Rye
 

Shlomit

Member
Messages
3
Points
0
Hi all,
I'm starting in the MUP program in NYU this fall. I've heard that the best thing about NYU is the network it provides and the assistance to find jobs, which is a great and important thing. After reviewing the alumni careers, it seems like they are not planners as I know it, but all sorts of managers and administrators. I wanted to know weather the great opportunities NYU provides are in fields I'm not interested in. What kind of a job should I expect after graduating?

In terms of education- It feels like the program lacks practical courses that are needed for planners, it just covers the theory. After having a few conversations with city planners I realized they all have an undergraduate degree in architecture, and they told me that that is what they are looking for in a city planner. I don't have any background in architecture- is the education I get from NYU enough to qualify me as an actual planner, even if I don't have any background in architecture? Do you think it's possible to take some additional courses while or after the degree in order to get the knowledge that's needed for planning? If so, where can I find such courses? Is taking such courses considered on par with the NYU main program by employers that want people with more design background (assuming the institution has comparable reputation)?

Thanks!
 

MacheteJames

Cyburbian
Messages
936
Points
20
After having a few conversations with city planners I realized they all have an undergraduate degree in architecture, and they told me that that is what they are looking for in a city planner. I don't have any background in architecture- is the education I get from NYU enough to qualify me as an actual planner, even if I don't have any background in architecture? Do you think it's possible to take some additional courses while or after the degree in order to get the knowledge that's needed for planning? If so, where can I find such courses? Is taking such courses considered on par with the NYU main program by employers that want people with more design background (assuming the institution has comparable reputation)?

Thanks!
I'm not sure which planners you spoke to, but I'd say that almost all the planners that I know personally, whether they be working for other communities or on the private sector, do not come from an architecture background. Most are planning school grads. Now, if the planners you talked to work on the Urban Design side of the field, then yes, an architectural background is much more common. For those of us on the policy end, that's not the case.
 

Aje68

Member
Messages
3
Points
0
I recently completed my undergraduate degree in accounting. My plan was to go for an M.S. in Accounting next year, and hopefully begin working in accounting with the next year. However, my family is trying to convince me not to go into accounting. They are pushing me to get into Real Estate Development. They want me to go to Columbia but I doubt I can get in to the program. I graduated undergrad with a degree in accounting, a 3.6 GPA, and 2 summer internships - one at a small accounting firm, and one at a Hedge fund. I also did not take the GMAT's. NYU is a much more realistic option for me. I really do not enjoy accounting and I likely would not last more than 2 years working in that field, but I really know very little about Real Estate and Development. It's a new territory for me. My mother has an estate that is worth a decent amount of money and she would like my brother and I to start our own real estate business.

I'm trying to learn more about development and I have a few questions about the NYU MSRED. With a decent GPA and no Real Estate work experience, do I have any chance getting into this program? Is it possible to begin the program in January and can the program be completed in less than 2 years(summer included)? The deadline for Fall application is August 1st and I don't think I can make a decision and get my application in on time. Just in general, how difficult and how much work has to be done for the program?

Any info you guys can give me would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.
 

John Black

Member
Messages
1
Points
0
am looking at applying to NYU Schack MSRE/MSRED for the Fall looking to get in to Acquisitions/Dispositions, I was wondering what backgrounds they look for? And is the acceptance rate that high?

I graduated UG in May with a 3.164 GPA and have just recently left a FT Risk Assurance gig at a Big 4 accounting firm to pursue Commercial Real Estate. my other work experience is in Market Research internship with a large book publisher, a PE summer analyst gig at a start up PE shop, and a project management internship with a big 3 PE shop (Think Bain Cap, Blackstone, KKR). Would this background be sufficient to apply without GMAT or should I look to get a 650+ on GMAT and apply for spring 2017. I am also sitting for CFA L1 in June.

Best regards
 

glutton

Cyburbian
Messages
428
Points
11
Did anyone apply to, visit, or graduate from NYU's Master's of Transportation Planning & Engineering program? I would love to hear your thoughts on that program or similar ones focusing on urban, multi-modal transportation!
 

Dan

Dear Leader
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
17,691
Points
57
Moved all (or most) of the NYU threads to a single thread, to make it easier for Google, Bing, and you to find it. :)

NYU vs Columbia / Pratt / Hunter / etc discussions are still in their own threads.
 
Messages
3
Points
0
Hi all,
I'm starting in the MUP program in NYU this fall. I've heard that the best thing about NYU is the network it provides and the assistance to find jobs, which is a great and important thing. After reviewing the alumni careers, it seems like they are not planners as I know it, but all sorts of managers and administrators. I wanted to know weather the great opportunities NYU provides are in fields I'm not interested in. What kind of a job should I expect after graduating?

In terms of education- It feels like the program lacks practical courses that are needed for planners, it just covers the theory. After having a few conversations with city planners I realized they all have an undergraduate degree in architecture, and they told me that that is what they are looking for in a city planner. I don't have any background in architecture- is the education I get from NYU enough to qualify me as an actual planner, even if I don't have any background in architecture? Do you think it's possible to take some additional courses while or after the degree in order to get the knowledge that's needed for planning? If so, where can I find such courses? Is taking such courses considered on par with the NYU main program by employers that want people with more design background (assuming the institution has comparable reputation)?

Thanks!
Great question, I still have the same concern.
 

glutton

Cyburbian
Messages
428
Points
11
@vroomvroom1597 : Mostly what I know about NYU is that it is a policy heavy school. That being said, you can probably see if you can take some cross-listed classes in their transportation planning and engineering department, or any other program. However, this will not prepare you to be an urban designer - for that you will need an Architecture or Landscape Arch background. Most land use planners work in zoning and development review, as well as some comprehensive planning. While it's nice have an understanding of architecture, civil engineering, or real estate, you don't need a full background in it. You just need one class's worth of basics.

Regarding the original concern about new york graduates not actually being planners, I can kind of vouch for that more generally. My program had a semester in NYC and honestly, most of them are not traditional planners. Some work in real estate, others in non-profits, and others in management/strategy consulting, sustainability, think tank/research, or international work. It's a a wide range. If you're looking for strictly land use, zoning, or traditional type of municipal planning, I think the smaller programs like Ball State University are better at that than the large programs that attract a lot of all-rounder and international type of students.

My other hunch is that when you graduate from some of the more expensive programs like NYU, you want to be able to earn enough to pay off your student debt. Working as a municipal land use planner (especially in NYC I've heard), won't really let you afford to do that. That's one reason why a lot of these East Coast graduates go on to do more planning-adjacent type of policy work rather than "actual" municipal planning jobs. That and maybe it's a prestige thing, idk...I feel like many people in these types of programs like thinking about cities and urban policy on a larger scale and want to write research reports or be project managers on massive infrastructure projects, but they don't really want to be caught in the day to day of rezoning a parcel, explaining fence setback requirements to a resident, moving bus stops, or running a public meeting in a church basement (like the typical Parks and Rec type of stuff).
 
Messages
3
Points
0
@vroomvroom1597 : Mostly what I know about NYU is that it is a policy heavy school. That being said, you can probably see if you can take some cross-listed classes in their transportation planning and engineering department, or any other program. However, this will not prepare you to be an urban designer - for that you will need an Architecture or Landscape Arch background. Most land use planners work in zoning and development review, as well as some comprehensive planning. While it's nice have an understanding of architecture, civil engineering, or real estate, you don't need a full background in it. You just need one class's worth of basics.

Regarding the original concern about new york graduates not actually being planners, I can kind of vouch for that more generally. My program had a semester in NYC and honestly, most of them are not traditional planners. Some work in real estate, others in non-profits, and others in management/strategy consulting, sustainability, think tank/research, or international work. It's a a wide range. If you're looking for strictly land use, zoning, or traditional type of municipal planning, I think the smaller programs like Ball State University are better at that than the large programs that attract a lot of all-rounder and international type of students.

My other hunch is that when you graduate from some of the more expensive programs like NYU, you want to be able to earn enough to pay off your student debt. Working as a municipal land use planner (especially in NYC I've heard), won't really let you afford to do that. That's one reason why a lot of these East Coast graduates go on to do more planning-adjacent type of policy work rather than "actual" municipal planning jobs. That and maybe it's a prestige thing, idk...I feel like many people in these types of programs like thinking about cities and urban policy on a larger scale and want to write research reports or be project managers on massive infrastructure projects, but they don't really want to be caught in the day to day of rezoning a parcel, explaining fence setback requirements to a resident, moving bus stops, or running a public meeting in a church basement (like the typical Parks and Rec type of stuff).
very helpful! thank you, I appreciate the feedback. my end goal is more aligned with running meetings from a church basement/community engagement so will definitely take your comments into consideration.
 

glutton

Cyburbian
Messages
428
Points
11
@vroomvroom1597 yeah in that case you would be well suited to really any program that stresses community planning, engagement, social justice, land use, and neighborhood planning. This could very well be NYU or any large program, but just consider if you'd be able to take on the debt/price tag it comes or not, or whether a smaller program will do just fine. The one nice thing about going with a larger, well-known program is that it gives you more options to do almost anything you want after graduation both locally and in other cities (or even later on in your career) whereas smaller programs are more limited in their connections and alumni base. But they're a lot cheaper so that's something to consider.

Good luck!
 
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