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No Need To GTC: It's Toledo

DetroitPlanner

Cyburbian Emeritus
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6,238
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27
Holy Toledo thats a big addition onto the mall!

I went down to Toledo to check out the scene over the weekend. I went to Franklin Park Mall and holy smokes is the new wing huge! I could hardly recognize the mall any more.

One thing that Toledo should be thankful for is if there is only going to be one successful mall in the toledo area that it is located within its limits. I still can't figure out why Southwyck is so dead, but Northtowne and is it Northwood? were built too far out into the sticks assuming more population growth than ever happened. I suppose the opening of Frenchtown in Monroe killed em off.

First the downtowns died
Then the neighborhood shopping zones
Now the major malls are drying up or becoming lifestyle centers

its an interesting thing to watch.
 

Super Amputee Cat

Cyburbian
Messages
2,502
Points
35
DetroitPlanner said:
I went down to Toledo to check out the scene over the weekend. I went to Franklin Park Mall and holy smokes is the new wing huge! I could hardly recognize the mall any more.

One thing that Toledo should be thankful for is if there is only going to be one successful mall in the toledo area that it is located within its limits. I still can't figure out why Southwyck is so dead, but Northtowne and is it Northwood? were built too far out into the sticks assuming more population growth than ever happened. I suppose the opening of Frenchtown in Monroe killed em off.

First the downtowns died
Then the neighborhood shopping zones
Now the major malls are drying up or becoming lifestyle centers

its an interesting thing to watch.


Well, "interesting" isn't the word I would use.

As you stated, the only good thing about Franklin Park Mall is that it is in the corporated limits of Toledo, not some goddamn suburb. So when all those shopaholics flock in from Sylvania and Bedford in their big SUVs to buy up all that flashy, overpriced clothing and f-me pumps - and carry it around in those huge shopping feedbags with the twine handles - at least the City of Toledo gets the sales tax. That aside, the place serves no worthy purpose whatsoever other than as a mecca of worship for the comsumerist zombie monoculture.

If you live in West Toledo you can't even see a movie anymore without going to the mall. National Amusements closed down three (3!) freestanding 1960s - 1980s cinemas when the new ones were built inside the mall. They even tore down one that was less than 20 years old, not for another building, but for a parking lagoon for those behemoth SUVs.
 

Bear Up North

Cyburbian Emeritus
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If you are a regular reader of this "Toledo" thread you probably noticed that today, Wednesday, 11-9-05, there is an article on the Cyburbia front page link to Planetizen......discussing the fact that Toledo ranks fifth (5th!) in the states in "unwired-access" to the internet. The findings were so suprising that those who did the survey had to recheck their data.

Hah !

Bear
 

DetroitPlanner

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
6,238
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Bear Up North said:
Toledo ranks fifth (5th!) in the states in "unwired-access" to the internet. The findings were so suprising that those who did the survey had to recheck their data.

I'd hardly find this surprising. Toledo does have a good mix of high-paying jobs, college students, and truckers (Corner of I-75 and I-89/I-90). I just find it amusing that all of these folks from the yuppielands think that old industrial cities are technological and cultural backwaters. While its true these places are no longer growing by eaps and bounds due to industrial ties, there is still a lot of wealth that was made in these areas and contributed back to the areas that help with today's wireless boom (U of T, Medical College of Ohio).
 

Bear Up North

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More Good & More Bad

Ahhh, Toledo, we hardly know thee......or do we?.....

Good.....The University of Toledo and the Medical University of Ohio (located just a few miles apart) are in initial talks that would merge the two (2) schools. Many universities in this here US of A have medical schools as part of their offering.....and these schools tend to be leaders in research, graduate programs, funding, etc.

A merger of these two (2) insitutions would create Ohio's third-largest university, behind only Ohio State University and the University of Cincinnati. And because consolidation would have a positive effect on overhead costs, it would bode well for future growth.

Here's hoping it comes to fruition.

Bad.....Toledo is on the verge of having the largest skyscraper in the world to be the recipient of a payoff on an insurance policy that pays if a building's owner can't meet the payments. Owens-Illinois' 30-story glass tower in downtown Toledo is losing its' main tenant, O-I, to a new suburban world headquarters. Unless the owners meet a balloon payment (by finding new tenants) this will be a first.

Not the kind of "firsts" that you like your community to be associated with. :-c

Bear
 

Bear Up North

Cyburbian Emeritus
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Some Good News

Toledo's Ford Motor Company stamping plant (800 employees in a suburban plant) and Toledo's large General Motors Corporation plant (2000 employees?) are both sitting a little LESS off the edge of their respective seats. Both plants are considered well-managed and productive and will not be part of recent closings that these large auto companies have planned.

Toledo's reputation as a "supplier park" for the automobile industry also continues to grow. This week three (3) more companies, each employing nearly 100 people, announced plans to move into the metro area.

With so much bad news in the manufacturing sector, it is nice to hear some good news.

Bear
 

Bear Up North

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Toledo News Continues

Interesting that with all of the news of automotive company plant closings, Toledo is considered the top candidate for a new GM plant. This plant will be an addition to the current (large) GM transmission plan on Alexis Road in north central Toledo, neat the Michigan state line. The addition will not increase the number of employees, because of the manufacturing efficiencies that new technology will provide.

The GM announcement.....with Toledo considered the best candidate....is expected soon.
_____

The merger of the University of Toledo and the Medical University of Ohio is moving at a fast pace. Most observers think that this is a great move for the community (and taxpayers). Eliminated will be a lot of organizational overhead and the upside includes a much-larger public presence, more research funding, and an expected higher ranking in university/college rankings.

It will become Ohio's third largest university.....only Ohio State University and the University of Cincinnati will be bigger.
_____

Toledo's new mayor gives his "State of the city" address tonight. This guy was mayor back in the late 1990's and was a very-loud cheerleader for the city and the area. He was also quite abrasive and continually was in the news, often for the "wrong reasons".

Toledo Express Airport, located about fifteen (15) miles outside of the corporate limits of Toledo, had a number of nearby private residences that fell within the airport's noise zone. As the government was purchasing those homes and moving the folks out, the mayor suggested that the abandoned homes (many only about 20 years old) be used for housing for the hearing-impaired. :-c

Neat way to make the national news.

He's back.

Bear
 

DetroitPlanner

Cyburbian Emeritus
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Now if we can only clear the parking lots throught the greater region of SUV's, we Western Lake Erieans would be in even better shape.

Note to other Cyburbians, if you're in the market for an SUV now is the time to buy one, there are tens of thousands sitting around Detroit and Toledo waiting for a good home.
 

Bear Up North

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No Superbowl Reservations

Toledo hotel owners are singing the blues. We are just a little more than a week away from a Superbowl in Detroit (with my fave Pittsburgh Steelers :) ) and all of the "promised" hotel reservations have not happened.

Two (2) years ago, the local Toledo hotel folks were asked to block out about 7,500 rooms for the Superbowl. Because of Toledo's proximity to Detroit, about fifty (50) miles, it appeared that Toledo would reap an economic windfall from the visitors.

It ain't happening, baby.

What could change this is a "bus" load of Steeler fans hitting the Toledo hotel stock on Super Weekend. We shall see.

Bear
 

DetroitPlanner

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Bear Up North said:
Toledo hotel owners are singing the blues. We are just a little more than a week away from a Superbowl in Detroit (with my fave Pittsburgh Steelers :) ) and all of the "promised" hotel reservations have not happened.

Two (2) years ago, the local Toledo hotel folks were asked to block out about 7,500 rooms for the Superbowl. Because of Toledo's proximity to Detroit, about fifty (50) miles, it appeared that Toledo would reap an economic windfall from the visitors.

It ain't happening, baby.

What could change this is a "bus" load of Steeler fans hitting the Toledo hotel stock on Super Weekend. We shall see.

Bear

I'm sure that Steeler Fans will find you. We're all sold out up here, I've heard some folks are going to Frankenmuth, I'd much rather be in T-town.
 

Bear Up North

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Toledo Zoo & Detroit Zoo

The Detroit Zoo is in the news. It looks like funding for the Detroit Zoo is going to stop, possibly as soon as May, 2006. That zoo will close, the animals will be sold (over the course of a year), and one (1) of the largest metropolitan areas in the USA will not have a Zoo to be proud of.

In articles about the closing, the Toledo Zoo is used as an example of how to go down the funding trail in the right manner. Both zoos have attendance in the range of 1,000,000 per/year.....but Toledo is a small metro (600,000) compared to Detroit (4,000,000).

Other zoos that have run into financial problems have been looking at the way that Toledo arranged their income stream AND actual ownership.

Toledo's Zoo did receive some negative attention in the last year because of the unexpected deaths of some animals. A new Zoo Director has been hired, and if this means anything, it could be seen as a positive: The first thing she did was to say "No" to the expensive automobile that was a job perk.....she said, "Gimme a Jeep Liberty, instead." (Jeep Liberty is a Toledo-made product.)

This Bear has been to a few zoos across the country. Still think that Toledo's is the best. My grand-daughter (about 8 at the time of my visit) loved the Children's Zoo in Fort Wayne.

Polar Bear Exhibit
 

DetroitPlanner

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The Detroit City Council is playing games in a power trip. The present deal is to have the Zoological society run the Zoo, but the City will retain ownership. Over the past 15 years or so the City has given this zoo some major upgrades, including a new gorrilla area, a wonderful artric ring of life (polar bears will swim about you as you walk through a thick plastic tube), Amphibnianville, and mumerous other inprovements.

These were all done with the generousity of local charitable groups and large corporations. Should they close this due to something this stupid (it will save the City $5 million in its budget), my greatest fear is people will stop donating things to the City in general.

Toledo has a great little zoo. The Detroit zoo in comparison is way too big. I think thats why Toledo attracts so many from such a large area. They can easily get through the zoo with the kids in an afternoon, then hit the Libbey Glass outlet, or the Docks (maybe include a morning trip to the art museum). Toledo's zoo is a great asset to the City.
 

Bear Up North

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Toledo Needs To Stay Out Of The National News

Seems like every time that Toledo is in the news, it is for a not-so-pleasant reason. T-Town was in the news again this past week.....

Muslim Charity Tied To Extremists.....On Sunday the Federal Government padlocked the headquarters of a Toledo-based charity. The charity, Kind Hearts, had raised millions of dollars.....but the feds said that the group had ties to the Palestine organization called Hamas.

This raised the temperature of many of the 6000 Muslims in the Toledo area.

Three Residents Charged In Terror Plot.....Over the weekend, three (3) men were arrested by federal authorities. All three (3) had been living in Toledo. Two (2) were arrested at their Toledo homes or businesses. The other was arrested overseas. All of this came to light during a press conference held by the U.S. Attorney General.

They were accused of trying to make bombs so they could conduct a "holy war" against the United States.....or U. S. interests overseas. They even were supposedly testing their bomb-making skills on the 4th of July, so the explosions would not be considered unusual.
_____

OTOH.....the investigations into the alleged terrorists was helped by local Muslims. Good for them.

BTW.....a Muslim works for this Bear. I haven't had a chance to talk with him to catch his view.

Bear
 

BKM

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Bear Up North said:
This Bear has been to a few zoos across the country. Still think that Toledo's is the best. My grand-daughter (about 8 at the time of my visit) loved the Children's Zoo in Fort Wayne.

Polar Bear Exhibit

The Children's Zoo is pretty fun, if a little tired in parts.
 

Bear Up North

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More Toledo Ups & Downs

We Toledoans have an identity problem, don't we?

The news from NW Ohio just keeps coming, most is bad, some is good.....

Dana Corporation.....Traditionalists would love the world headquarters of automotive parts giant Dana Corporation. Set on slightly rolling terrain in Toledo's west side, it looks more like corporate for an insurance company, rather than HQ for one (1) of the world's largest producers of transmissions, axles, etc. The buuilding would make a great set as a southern mansion. (A BIG southern mansion.)

The company has really struggled during the recent hard times for automotive-related companies. Also, a huge accounting error forced the company to re-state earnings. On Friday, Dana Corporation closed at around $2 a share. About a year or so ago it was at $17. Banruptcy is being discussed in business conversations about Dana. :(

Shipbuilding.....Toledo has always had shipbuilding yards. The original (and very famous if you know the Great Lakes) Coast Guard Cutter Mackinaw was built in Toledo. Other major carriers were built and/or repaired at Toledo's yards. Even American Shipbuilding once had a huge facility on the Maumee River. (If you know baseball, you know New York Yankee owner George Stienbrenner.....American was his company.)

One (1) of the shipyards has been closesd for a number of years. About two (2) years ago a large Great Lakes ship repair corporation grabbed some tax incentives and announced plans to refurbish the yard, bringing back a number of high-paying jobs. That deal fell through.

This week, another group has announced similar plans.....so Toledo, located on the largest river that feeds the Great Lakes, will probably get another shipyard. :)

General Motors Investments.....With all of the bad news for General Motors, the Toledo GM faciliy, a huge GM Powertrain plant on the northwest side of town, appears to have won the battle for a huge tech investment. The plant will be getting a huge addition.....and the focus will be on the manufacture of 6-speed transmissions (better for fuel consumption). The plant is the winner because it always rank as number one (1) in productivity.....which says good things about the automation and tech investments in that facility and says great things about the workforce.

A New Arena, It's Location & The Marina District.....The central business district of Toledo is located on the west side of the Maumee River. In a stretch about a mile long on the east side of the river, there is a a undeveloped parcel of land. This stretch has the Toledo Sports Arena (just about the worst arena you could ever be in.....trust me on this!), a number of old buildings that are falling down, and an old Toledo Edison plant.

For the last few years the local administrations have been developing plans for what is called "The Marina District". Elaborate plans included small retail, apartments, river walks.....and discussions have been going on with Bass Pro (a large sportsmen/fishing retail chain). Original plans also included a new arena in this area, replacing the funky Sports Arena.

A city-funded survey showed that the best place for a new arena was in the central business district, on the west side of the river, next to the new Fifth Third baseball stadium. So.....all the politicians argue about the status of the Marina District and the location of any new arena.

BTW.....also on the east side of the river is an area called "The Docks". This is a group of restaurants, located on the river, with great views of the west side of the river's skyline. The Docks have been quite successful.
_____

All of these Toledo topics are embedded in Cyburbia subject matter.....redevelopment of central business districts, maximizing natural assets (as in the Maumee River), funding for public arenas, large corporations with large money problems, the quest to bring in high-paying jobs to your area, etc.

Toledo (and the metro) seem to be a good study for a lot of these rustbelt town issues.

Bear
 

Bear Up North

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Update On Transmission Plant & Dana

Bear Up North said:
Dana Corporation.....Traditionalists would love the world headquarters of automotive parts giant Dana Corporation. Set on slightly rolling terrain in Toledo's west side, it looks more like corporate for an insurance company, rather than HQ for one (1) of the world's largest producers of transmissions, axles, etc. The buuilding would make a great set as a southern mansion. (A BIG southern mansion.)

The company has really struggled during the recent hard times for automotive-related companies. Also, a huge accounting error forced the company to re-state earnings. On Friday, Dana Corporation closed at around $2 a share. About a year or so ago it was at $17. Banruptcy is being discussed in business conversations about Dana. :(

General Motors Investments.....With all of the bad news for General Motors, the Toledo GM faciliy, a huge GM Powertrain plant on the northwest side of town, appears to have won the battle for a huge tech investment. The plant will be getting a huge addition.....and the focus will be on the manufacture of 6-speed transmissions (better for fuel consumption). The plant is the winner because it always rank as number one (1) in productivity.....which says good things about the automation and tech investments in that facility and says great things about the workforce.

Bear

What can you say about a business week like this in Toledo? More of the good and the bad.....

General Motors made it official that they were making the big dollar investment in northwest Toledo's Powertrain Plant. Lots of smiling faces over that news.

Later in the same week, Dana Corporation (a Toledo Fortune 500 Company), saw its' stock free-fall. On Friday, 3-3-06, they filed for bankruptcy protection.

Side Note: My Dad had a business relationship of sorts with the original company that eventually morphed into Dana Corporation. That company was called Spicer Transmission and they had a big plant on the west side of Toledo. In the 1940's and early 1950's my Dad was in business was another local guy, selling box lunches to Spicer employees.

Eventually my Dad grew tired of sharing the business and moved on. The other guy formed a company that grew to be one (1) of the largest food service organizations in the midwest.

Bear
 

Bear Up North

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Toledo In The News

Toledo continues its' trend of being in the news spotlight.....

Too bad the spotlight usually shows some ugly stuff. :-c

Catholic Priests.....If you saw the highly-acclaimed flick "Twist of Faith" you know it was all about a Toledo firefighter who tells the camera all about the sexual assualts on him (when he was a young boy) committed by a Toledo Roman Catholic priest. The movie won some awards.

Now, the national news media is here for the murder trial of Father Robinson. He has been charged with killing a nun, about 25 years ago, in a chapel at a hospital. The charge also (supposedly) involves ritual killings that a group of Toledo priests and laymen were involved in.

No Bass Pro.....The word on the street is that Bass Pro Shops are going to pass on the chance to locate a mega-store in Toledo, along the river in the area being developed that is known as "The Marina District".

They are still considering a Toledo-area location.....the highly-coveted retail site that is at the junction of I-80, I-90, and I-75. This area is known as "The Golden Triangle" because of its' proximity next to these major interstates. It is in Rossford (and Perrysburg Township).

Bear
 

DetroitPlanner

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Bear Up North said:
Toledo continues its' trend of being in the news spotlight.....

No Bass Pro.....The word on the street is that Bass Pro Shops are going to pass on the chance to locate a mega-store in Toledo, along the river in the area being developed that is known as "The Marina District".

They are still considering a Toledo-area location.....the highly-coveted retail site that is at the junction of I-80, I-90, and I-75. This area is known as "The Golden Triangle" because of its' proximity next to these major interstates. It is in Rossford (and Perrysburg Township).

Bear

That would surprise me, there is already one in the Detroit area, and a Cabellas 15 minutes N of Toledo. Now somewhere like Sandusky......
 

Bear Up North

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One of Toledo's inner-ring suburbs, Maumee, OH, was just named as one of the best places in America to raise a family. Three communities from Ohio made that list of 100 places.

This Bear lived in Maumee for a short time (1969), played basketball in Maumee all year long (inside and outside) for more than twenty-five years, and have enjoyed more than a fair share of adult beverages at Maumee taverns (including Dale's Bar, a favorite).

An ex-wife was from Maumee and a present-day bro-in-law now resides in Maumee. His wife commented just the other day that she was suprised that the racial makeup of the city was changing. (She was not being racist.....just making a comment.)

Maumee has been very successful in luring business away from central core city Toledo. Their huge industrial and business park (Arrowhead) has been a bright spot for the area, but not quite a favorite of Toledo leaders who watch their companies hit the road for the 'burbs.

Downtown Maumee is very nice. It is at the top of a hill (from the Maumee River valley) and has some nice buildings. Recently a community group worked to restore the old Maumee Theater, a small-town theater that had been closed for many years. The city actively promotes the "Spring Walleye Run" (thousands fish the Maumee River at Maumee when walleyes and white bass are spawning). In the Summer, the city has a big street festival that is starting to rival in size some of the other festivals in NW Ohio.

As mentioned in an "agri-business" thread, Maumee is world headquarters for a very successful company called The Anderson's. In addition to huge midwest grain elevators, the company has general stores, manufactures products made from grains (such as dog food, fertilizer, and now....Ethanol), and is one of the nation's largest owners of railcars.

Much of the housing stock in Maumee is right up that middle-class alley.....moderate homes, mostly small ranch-style homes and some great older homes near the downtown. Some of the homes that are perched on top of the hill that overlooks the Maumee River are beautiful. The area near the Ohio Turnpike interchange has many hotels, motels, restaurants, car dealers, strip centers, etc. The big interchange also is adjacent to a massive UPS hub that has its' own exit/entrance to the toll road.

The Lucas County Recreation Center (ball fields, county fairgrounds) is in Maumee. One of the newest hospitals in the area is in Maumee. A nice system of parks that hug the river is also in Maumee. These park areas include the remains of canal locks. (And these parks are filled with deer. They are everywhere....pretty to look at but almost at a nuisance level.)

All of these things do, indeed, make Maumee, OH, a nice place to raise a family. Good for them and their award. :)

Bear
 

BKM

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Bear Up North said:
One of Toledo's inner-ring suburbs, Maumee, OH, was just named as one of the best places in America to raise a family. Three communities from Ohio made that list of 100 places.

This Bear lived in Maumee for a short time (1969), played basketball in Maumee all year long (inside and outside) for more than twenty-five years, and have enjoyed more than a fair share of adult beverages at Maumee taverns (including Dale's Bar, a favorite).

An ex-wife was from Maumee and a present-day bro-in-law now resides in Maumee. His wife commented just the other day that she was suprised that the racial makeup of the city was changing. (She was not being racist.....just making a comment.)

Maumee has been very successful in luring business away from central core city Toledo. Their huge industrial and business park (Arrowhead) has been a bright spot for the area, but not quite a favorite of Toledo leaders who watch their companies hit the road for the 'burbs.

Downtown Maumee is very nice. It is at the top of a hill (from the Maumee River valley) and has some nice buildings. Recently a community group worked to restore the old Maumee Theater, a small-town theater that had been closed for many years. The city actively promotes the "Spring Walleye Run" (thousands fish the Maumee River at Maumee when walleyes and white bass are spawning). In the Summer, the city has a big street festival that is starting to rival in size some of the other festivals in NW Ohio.

As mentioned in an "agri-business" thread, Maumee is world headquarters for a very successful company called The Anderson's. In addition to huge midwest grain elevators, the company has general stores, manufactures products made from grains (such as dog food, fertilizer, and now....Ethanol), and is one of the nation's largest owners of railcars.

Much of the housing stock in Maumee is right up that middle-class alley.....moderate homes, mostly small ranch-style homes and some great older homes near the downtown. Some of the homes that are perched on top of the hill that overlooks the Maumee River are beautiful. The area near the Ohio Turnpike interchange has many hotels, motels, restaurants, car dealers, strip centers, etc. The big interchange also is adjacent to a massive UPS hub that has its' own exit/entrance to the toll road.

The Lucas County Recreation Center (ball fields, county fairgrounds) is in Maumee. One of the newest hospitals in the area is in Maumee. A nice system of parks that hug the river is also in Maumee. These park areas include the remains of canal locks. (And these parks are filled with deer. They are everywhere....pretty to look at but almost at a nuisance level.)

All of these things do, indeed, make Maumee, OH, a nice place to raise a family. Good for them and their award. :)

Bear


I was surprised how nice Maumee was. I also really liked the old part of Perrysburg (the main street and the original grid). Some of the McMansions in Perrysburg and nearby are annoying, but, overall a lovely area.
 

Bear Up North

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BKM said:
I was surprised how nice Maumee was. I also really liked the old part of Perrysburg (the main street and the original grid). Some of the McMansions in Perrysburg and nearby are annoying, but, overall a lovely area.

Back in the 1970's, this Bear lived on Fifth Street, grid-pattern, Perrysburg, OH. The tiny house was built in the 1800's and it was not insulated. The walls were so funky that when it snowed and the wind blew we would have little piles of snow inside of the house, along the wall.

That house is now really nice (not from my efforts) and is part of the historical district feel that you get in Perrysburg's core. Downtown Perrysburg is quite attractive. Some of the dive bars that used to be in the downtown area are long gone :-c and have been replaced by nice little shops. When Piatt's Bakery was still in business a regular visitor was Bob Hope (with relatives in the area). President Reagan did a whistlestop in downtown Perrysburg, during one of his campaigns for the presidency. (The train tracks are still utilized, but not often.)

The physical relationships to Maumee? The two Toledo suburbs face each other across the Maumee River. Downtown Maumee's main street, Conant Street, leads directly down the hill to the bridge that crosses the river. Downtown Perrysburg is about one mile northeast of that bridge.

Perrysburg, Perrysburg Township, and Rossford are vibrant and fast-growing suburbs. The new folks in these 'burbs are not from the "outside world", though.....they are residents from Toledo (primarily). Perrysburg has two very large sprawl areas. One is along US 20, east of the I-75 interchange. Throw out the name of just about any big box and it is along this stretch. Wally World is in the process of developing their site plan. The other sprawl area is on Ohio 25. That heavy-traffic area adjacent to I-475/US 23 has a new Lifestyle Center, new office and commerce parks, and the new world headquarters for Fortune 500 corporation Owens-Illinois is almost completed. (O-I is leaving behind a 30-story skyscraper in downtown Toledo.)

The southern boundaries of Perrysburg, along the river, include some of the biggest new houses that I have ever seen. Many of these were built on the site of a Catholic Seminary that closed (and sold the land to developers). For years I played basketball at that seminary. The northern boundaries of Perrysburg, along the river, have huge estates that have been re-developed into McMansion sites. An example would be the XXXX Estate, which used to be hundreds of acres, including a huge mansion on the river. The mansion remains but now a gated community is on a large portion of that land.

BTW.....Maumee and Perrysburg don't just share the Maumee River valley view. They have an intense high school sports rivalry. Maumee Panthers versus Perrysburg Yellow Jackets.

Bear
 

Bear Up North

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Maumee Award

Maumee, OH.....a Toledo suburb oft-mentioned in this thread.....was one of a handful of USA cities to by awarded as an "All American City", in competition that just finished in mid-June, 2006.

Congrats to the folks in that fine community. Get up the signs. :)

Bear
 

Bear Up North

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Toledo's Mayor Out Of Control? & Water

Yeah, Toledo made the national news again. This time for a shouting match (almost turning into a push and shove affair) between the Chief of Police and Hizoner The Mayor. The Chief was relieved of his top badge duties (back to being a Captain) and the Mayor placed the former Chief back in the top chair. (He had kicked this guy down about a half year ago.)

They were arguing about the gang problem in Toledo. Others who have been interviewed indicate that Toledo's Mayor is out of control.....continually shouting at subordinates, demanding that people promote the city with the enthusiasm that he promotes it with. This morning he took all of his managers on another bus tour, going through certain areas of the city and pointing out the problems and issues. He is so enthusiastic he actually jumped out of the bus and re-stacked old garbage cans in their proper place.

While I admire his enthusiasm, a good leader doesn't slide back to shouting and intimidation to the extent that this guy does. A quickie poll on a local TV station today asked the question, "Is he out of control?" The responses.....90% said "yes". (Responders certainly were the pixxed off folks but that number is very high.)
_____

A week ago, the severe flooding in northwest Ohio, including Toledo, made national news. However, the flooding here pales in comparison to the news on the wires from the eastern U.S.

Toledo's damage estimate was that 3% of the houses were damaged. Most of that damage was in the form of flooded basements. There were a few houses that sustained major damage above the ground, including some that moved off of their foundations.

Bear
 

Bear Up North

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Messages
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Interesting

Very strange way for Toledo to again make the national news.....

Last night a 17-year old boy was shot in the buttocks.....on Boody Street, in south Toledo. :-c
_____

Hickory Farms of Ohio was founded in Toledo, back about 1957. In the late 1970's the headquarters was moved to suburban Maumee. Most of you probably remember when Hickory Farms stores were in malls all over the country. As malls went out of favor, HF morphed from full stores to aisle kiosks.....and now is mainly a catalog and holiday season store.

In addition to the national headquarters, HF has a huge distribution center in Maumee, in the same industrial park. Today they announced that they plan on building a new state-of-the-art distribution center in the Joliet, IL, area. This move is furthered by the fact that most of the products that HF uses comes from Wisconsin, Iowa, and Illinois.

Officials are not saying if Hickory Farms will keep the Maumee DC. They did promise to keep HQ in Maumee. (My Father was a good friend of the founder. Drinking buddies. :-o )
_____

Strange that metro Toledo is also home to world headquarters of another holiday food specialist.....Honey Baked Hams. No wonder we are one of America's fattest cities.....if the cheese and summer sausage don't get ya, the honey ham will. :-c :p
_____

And back to buttock wounds.....

A friend of mine (now retired) was the former Executive Director of the Toledo-Lucas County Safety Council (which morphed into the Safety Council of NW Ohio). At a safety convention, back in the 1970's (in Chicago), he was leaving a nightclub with some safety buddies and he was stabbed in the buttocks.

His rear-end plight made national news at that time.....which makes me believe that Toledo really is the "butt" of all jokes. ;)

We had a great time kidding him after that little episode.

Bear
 

Bear Up North

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Toledo Lounge In D.C.

"The (Toledo) Blade" had an interesting story in today's Sunday newspaper. The story focused on a very-successful tavern located in Washington, D.C. The name of this popular spot.....the Toledo Lounge.

It was opened about ten years ago by a pair of Toledo, OH, women, in a neighborhood that has become "trendy".....Adams Morgan. The tavern has been picked as one of Washington's "10 best".

The interior is filled with images of and about its' namesake city......University of Toledo pics, Muddy the Mud Hen (baseball team mascot) pic, seal of the City of Toledo, etc.

Article indicated that it is a tough place to get in to on weekends, because of crowds.

Interesting.

Bear Not So Trendy
 

Super Amputee Cat

Cyburbian
Messages
2,502
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I heard about this many years ago, but forgot all about visiting it when I was in DC in '03. Glad to hear it was still in business.
 

Bear Up North

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More Toledo Stuff

Owens-Illinois.....One of Toledo's oldest and largest Fortune 500 headquarters was located in downtown Toledo, in a 32-story glass-scraper built in the early 1980's. Today, the company.....with a shortened-name (OI) has moved to a campus-like setting, in suburban Perrysburg, OH. Today is the end of an era for the city.....although, most metropolitan folks are quite happy that the corporate headquarters stayed in the area. New owners of the handsome riverfront tower will try to fill it with smaller company digs.

Toledo's Other Fortune 500's.....As mentioned-often, Toledo once-upon-a-time was home to a significant number of Fortune 500 headquarters. Owens-Corning Fiberglass ("Pink Panther" logo :) ) vacated their 1960's 30-story tower a number of years ago and relocated a few blocks away, on the river, in a campus-like setting. No tower. The old building has been empty since.

Dana Corporation built a traditional campus-like set of buildings (looks like a college campus) out in west Toledo, across the road from world-famous Inverness Golf Course.

All the other Fortune 500 HQ's that were in Toledo are long gone.

Population Woes?.....Seems to me that you can simplify SOME of the logic behind the large cities that lost significant population, as reported this past week. Family size.....if you look at Toledo's 380,000 population in 1970 and divide by four you get 95,000 households. With smaller familes.....multiply that 95,000 households by 3.....the result is about what is now reported for Toledo.....285,000.

Yeah, over-simplification.....but.....size DOES matter.

Regional Government.....the Editor of a local (weekly) newspaper was covering for a vacationing local talk radio talk show dude. He was taking calls on the topic of regional government, un-gov, county government, etc. Lots of interesting and VERY PREDICTABLE responses.

My take.....Toledo will get the 'burbs to jump in.....except for maybe some small stuff, such as some shared services.

Bear
 

Super Amputee Cat

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Bear Up North said:
Owens-Illinois.....One of Toledo's oldest and largest Fortune 500 headquarters was located in downtown Toledo, in a 32-story glass-scraper built in the early 1980's. Today, the company.....with a shortened-name (OI) has moved to a campus-like setting, in suburban Perrysburg, OH. Today is the end of an era for the city.....although, most metropolitan folks are quite happy that the corporate headquarters stayed in the area. New owners of the handsome riverfront tower will try to fill it with smaller company digs.

Feck O-I. Sincerely. Elistist bastards. I'd rather have them move to Mexico than friggin' Perrysburg. Toledo will gain absolutely nothing from this move and only stand to lose more residents and sales tax dollars to Wood County, thus creating more sprawl and traffic congestion. At least that prick former mayer won't be able to say "No money, no comey" anymore.

Population Woes?.....Seems to me that you can simplify SOME of the logic behind the large cities that lost significant population, as reported this past week. Family size.....if you look at Toledo's 380,000 population in 1970 and divide by four you get 95,000 households. With smaller familes.....multiply that 95,000 households by 3.....the result is about what is now reported for Toledo.....285,000.

Yeah, over-simplification.....but.....size DOES matter.

In 1950 Toledo covered less than 40 square miles and had a population of 305,000. Now it covers 80 square miles (they doubled their size during the annexation frenzy of the 1950s and '60s) and has less people. So the density is less than half as much, yet the traffic congestion is worse than ever.

One wonders how bad Toledo would be off if they hadn't annexed all that land. I think it would have less than 150,000 people and a decaying infrastructure similar to Youngstown or Gary. They should have annexed the Hell out of Sylvania Township when they had the chance.

[/QUOTE]
 

DetroitPlanner

Cyburbian Emeritus
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Hey, at least the gas is cheap in Toledo

http://www.gasbuddy.com/GB_Price_List.aspx

At the time of this posting, third cheapest in the nation, right behind Dayton and Des Moines. ($2.64/gallon)

I've wondered how this could be for the last several years your gas tax is higher than ours, we are in roughly the same place goegraphically, but Toledo Gas is nearly always less expensive than it is N of the State line. My hunch is it has to do with the # of refineries and proximinty to Findley, but I could be all wet.
 

Mitchell1971

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This old Bear is not an official planner, but I can tell you things about Ohio's 4th largest city (6th largest metro).....

In the early part of the 20th Century Toledo was in the Top 20 in population. It was growing fast. Automobile manufacturing and automobile parts manufacturing were natural follow-ups to Toledo's 19th Century position of "Wagon Capitol Of The World".

But, something happened. A lot of the jobs.....and the people.....flocked to Detroit or Chicago. Toledo stopped growing.

In the 1960's T-Town took on an aggressive annexation policy. Township after township was grabbed and Toledo's population started to shoot toward the 400,000 mark. The 1970's started a long demise in manufacturing jobs, which continues today.

Toledo was the smallest city with the most Fortune 500 Headquarters. It had about seven (7).....but most of those are gone. Champion Spark Plug, gobbled by Cooper Industries. Libbey-Owens-Ford Glass Company grabbed by England's Pilkington. Owens-Illinois grabbed by KKR, then sold back. Questor Corp. bought by who-the-heck remembers.

Owens-Corning is still here, bankrupt filings and all. Toledo Scale is now in Columbus. Toledo still makes Jeeps.....for the Germans.

Many Toledo residents moved on, mostly to those places that a lot of "rust belt America" moved to.....south and southwest.

Those that stayed enjoyed the best and put-up-with the worst that a small metro can provide:

Toledo residents have very little sprawl to deal with. Central Avenue in west Toledo (and Sylvania Township), the south suburb of Perrysburg, Monroe Street at the area's only super regional mall. Thus, getting around is pretty quick and easy.
(Toledo has it's share of expressways that allow the residents relatively easy movement. Of course, they were designed with 1960's traffic projections and even a non-growing town has increasing vehicle traffic.)

There actually are some interesting things to do in T-Town, including one (1) of the Top 10 at museums in the U.S., the most-complete zoo in America, visiting Tony Packo's restaurant (you had to watch multiple episodes of Mash to understand).

Crime is consistent with a city of this size. A high percentage of folks own their own homes. Many areas of the actual city are very nice residential areas.

Probably the toughest issue that Toledo folks deal with is the image of the city: Nowhere-Ville. And people like me perpetuate that line with long, rambling internet posts.

More later about the (heh heh) "Glass Capitol Of The World".

Bear

I lived in Toledo for around 6 years (three of those in Waterville). I moved from Atlanta at 16. I moved to Chicago at 20 and came back at 21 until 23.

When I came back from Chicago I wanted to find as urban an area as I could and ended up living in what I was told was Old Town across from The Old West End. I lived at Boston Pl. My land lord wanted to sell me one of the houses he owned and re-habbed very nicely. The asking price: 35,000!! (It almost might make sense to move it to a vacant lot in Chicago-where I now live again--where it would easily fetch 500K to a million depending on neighborhood).

I was always dismayed by my friends attitudes toward their town. No one liked where they were. Most of them lived in the surrounding areas, and very few lived in the "downtown" area ("downtown" would in this sense be The Old West End"). I always remarked that the reason the city isn't any fun is because you don't live down here. They were still mystified that someone not mentally ill or borderline homeless would, by choice, live downtown.

I remember on one of my "walkabouts" in and around the city center I came across the Bakery Building and met the woman who, with her architect husband, were rehabbing the building and turning it into apts. They'd completed their condo and one other apt. with about 6 others in the process. There was a waiting list to get in!

Then on a return I'd learned the Macy's building was being rehabbed and actually got in to look around on a trip to Ann Arbor. The view from the roof deck was stupendous. The old Hillcrest was being rehabbed as well as a couple of other buildings too which was great news.

I don't know why, but I've always had a soft spot for these middle size and smaller, dense midwestern cities. I'm glad to see Toledo make a go of it and hope it continues successfully.

I think Toledo would do well to adopt something NYC did in the early 80's in places like the Lower East Side. They crafted "homesteading" programs which basically transferred title for $1 if they could prove resources to rehab and live there for 5 years.

I'm sure Toledo has enough buildings on the tax role to give away.

Anyway, I just found this site and am glad I did.
 

Bear Up North

Cyburbian Emeritus
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Toledo & Wind Power

Nice to see Toledo in the running for one of six planned wind energy test facilities. The location being pushed in Toledo is on the east side of the Maumee River, adjacent to the Port of Toledo facilities. Those facilities would provide direct water access for transporting of equipment, such as turbine blades that could be as long as 328 feet. The port has huge cranes that could handle these massive blades, easy access to the interstate highway system, and greenfield and brownfield sites just itching for new development.

Wind farms now have turbines that range from 132 feet (such as in nearby Bowling Green, OH) to 203 feet (offshore in Europe). The facility would test and help develop the know-how to push wind energy as a great future source for the power we need.

Another feather in Toledo's cap......the metro is home to one of the world's largest manufacturers of solar panels AND the University of Toledo has been very actively pursuing programs that run alongside renewable energy.
_____

A month or so ago it was proposed that Toledo build wind turbines in Maumee Bay, a normally-high-wind body of water at the western end of Lake Erie. This proposal would go hand-in-hand with the Department of Energy testing facilities that are mentioned above.
_____

Flyway issues.....there is a problem with the Maumee Bay proposal. The Ottawa National Wildlife Preserve is located along the shores of Lake Erie, about 20 miles east of Toledo. This is a natural landing spot for ducks and geese.....part of one of the main north-to-south flyways.

Bear
 

Bear Up North

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The Bridges Of Toledo

Because of its' location along the Maumee River, Toledo has a number of river crossings. There are a few railroad crossings, including a couple that have been abandoned. The vehicle crossings.....

Cherry Street / Martun Luther King
This is a traditional drawbridge. It is located on the edge of downtown Toledo. When you approach the bridge you are on a major west-side-of-the-river thouroghfare, Cherry Street. From the east-side-of-the-river you are on Main Street.

Craig Memorial Bridge
This might be the only drawbridge that is still part of the Interstate Highway System. This bridge, I-280, is a high-traffic-density bridge. It is going to be replaced, in less than a year, by.....

Veteran's Skyway
Not really sure of the name of this bridge. It is a cable-stayed crossing of the Maumee River. Another famous cable-stayed brridge would be the Sunshine Skyway (Tampa Bay). This new Toledo bridge (I-280) is Ohio's largest-ever single road construction project.

Noisy Bridge
When we were kids (1950's) there was a 2-lane bridge that crossed the river, south of the downtown area. It was offically called the Fawcett Street Bridge but we called it "the noisy bridge", because of the loud sound that a vehicle's tires made when using the mostly-grated route.

In the late 1950's, hurricane-force winds pushed a lake freighter into the bridge, knocking a portion of it down. The bridge was not repaired and was eventually torn down.

Maumee-Perrysburg Bridge
The southern metro suburbs of Maumee and Perrysburg have a brand new bridge that connects these communities.

Ohio Turnpike Bridge
I-80 / I-90 (The Ohio Turnpike) has a bridge that crosses the river, about 6 miles south of downtown Toledo. From this bridge the newbie-to-the-area can see the skyline of Toledo, the large homes that hug the hillsides of the river valley, and the numerous boats (in season) that play on the wide river.

Disalle Bridge
I-75 worms its' way through central Toledo, including crossing the river from suburban Rossford to an area just south of downtown Toledo. It was named for a former Toledoan who became an Ohio governor, Michael Disalle. It is not a drawbridge or a suspension ("high level") bridge. When it was built, grain elevators and huge sand storage areas were all closed, because the big lake freighters could not access them.

When you are crossing the Disalle Bridge you will see the grain elevators that were on the downriver portion.....some of the largest elevators in the midwest.

Anthony Wayne Bridge
Those of us from the area have always called it "The High-Level Bridge". Named for General "Mad" Anthony Wayne, it is Toledo's only suspension bridge. Like all suspension bridges, it is graceful and photogenic. But old warehouses are so close to the access ramps you could almost jump on to their roofs from the bridge. The west side of the bridge doesn't blend well into the street pattern, forcing westbound drivers to turn on cross streets.

If heading to the east, the bridge curves slightly near the base, and the road becomes a busy street, Woodville Road.

Years ago a friend of mine was returning from a fishing expedition. His boat was on a trailer and he went around that access curve a little too fast.....his boat slid off the trailer and onto the roadway. I was not there.....but we later all had some good chuckles.
_____

Hope you enjoyed your tour of the main bridges of Toledo, OH.

Bear
 

Bear Up North

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Toledo's Glass Pavilion

Interesting news.....

"Travel & Leisure Magazine" has named the new Toledo Musem Of Art's Glass Pavilion as BEST MUSEUM, in their March, 2007, issue. This new building, across Monroe Street from the main building, The Toledo Museum of Art, was designed by a pair of Japanese architects. In a bit of a backhanded compliment the magazine said, "This new building alone is a reason to go to Toledo, a place you might not otherwise visit."

Because of the Toledo Museum of Art's huge (and very famous) collection of glass, this glass-walled, curved-line facility is quite appropriate, and stunning.

In case you didn't know.....the Toledo Museum of Art is considered one of the best in the world.....and this across-the-street addition to its' campus is just another feather in a cap lined with color.

If any Cyburbians make it to Toledo to see the new facility (and perhaps the famous Toledo Zoo.....a U.S.A. top ten zoo.....or Tony Packo's famous restaurant) give me a buzz.

:)

Bear
 

Bear Up North

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DetroitPlanner.....Yes, the building you noticed that was under construction (across Monroe Street from the Museum) is the new Glass Pavilion. I did read a few more reviews, in national magazines and newspapers....all very positive about this structure and the impression it leaves on the visitor.
_____

Toledo's mayor is trying to do what so many other big city mayors try to do.....balance a budget that is ballooning. This week the mayor announced that the Fire Chief will not be replaced. The Fire Chief is retiring.....although retirement to him is taking the form of applying for the same position in Washington, DC, and in San Antonio, TX.

The Chief of Police will assume the Fire Chief duties.

When the news media heard this, they were wondering about the level of "fire" experience. His response was that he counts on key personnel to provide the expertise.....no matter if the business is fighting crime or fighting fires.

I agree. In most organizations, the person at the "top" doesn't have to know the minute details. That person has to have the ability to choose (and retain) high performers and those with detailed knowledge of the specific topic.

I don't agree with Toledo's mayor on many issues. This one I agree with.

Bear
 

Bear Up North

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From Monroe, MI To Swanton, OH

Katie and this Bear were in Monroe, MI late Saturday afternoon. For those of you who have never buzzed up or down I-75, originally called The Detroit-Toledo Expressway, here's a bit of a tour.....

Monroe, MI is more connected to Detroit than Toledo, although you reach the suburbs of either city in about the same time span. Monroe is the world headquarters of La-Z-Boy Corporation :-D and is also the site of numerous automobile parts manufacturing facilities and headquarters. Visible from I-75 are the towers of Enrico Fermi (a nuclear power plant that was "memorialized" in a 1970s book called "We Almost Lost Detroit") and the stacks of the world's largest single user of coal for the creation of electricity, Detroit Edison's Monroe Plant.

There is a nice little waterfront bar, on the Raisin River, just off the expressway. Be careful on the ramps.....1950s-style ramps, tight turns, etc.

Heading south toward Ohio (18 miles away) the terrain is flat and primarily swampland.....the western end of Lake Erie. For newbies looking to view the lake from I-75.....not gonna happen. The lake is about a mile from the expressway and the swampland eventually morphs to a tree line, blocking any view of the lake.

As you near the state line you buzz past the small city of Luna Pier. It is a lakefront community and in the past dozen or so years a number of new lakefront developments have been built. For years it was just a quiet 1920s-style resort community.

Toledo's largest suburb is actually Bedford Township, MI. However, this trip on I-75 routes you through Erie Township, MI.....a primarily rural splotch of real estate that has experienced very little growth. Bedford Township is six miles to the west. That rural-feel ends rather abruptly at the state line.....the sound barrier walls begin right at that point, on both sides of the expressway, protecting the residential developments of north Toledo from vehicle noise.

Those noise barrier walls will continue for a few miles, although industrial parks and railroad yards have no walls. The industrial parks are primarily new construction.....the small (aka union-free) companies that manufacture auto parts on a just-in-time basis for the huge Jeep complex that you will soon slide past.

Alexis Road is a primary exit.....a 1970s afterthought, when Alexis Road was extended from its' former terminus at Detroit Avenue. This Bear spent some fun teen years in a neighborhood just east of this location, the Shoreland neighborhood. I-75 crosses over the Ottawa River, considered one of the most-polluted rivers in the country. :-c

Ottawa River Road traffic merges into the expressway, the primary entrance for most of the residents of Point Place, Toledo's lakeside neighborhood. There is a huge train yard next to the expressway, shielding your view of the north Toledo landfill. I-75 curves west at this point and this industrial highway that had 6 total lanes of traffic splits into I-280 (South) with 4 lanes and I-75 (South) with 4 lanes.

At this junction is the huge new Daimler-Chrysler facilities, building the world-famous Jeep (and some other Dodge truck products). This huge state-of-the-art manufacturing plant replaced what was the oldest operating automobile manufacturing plant in the world, a couple miles south on I-75.

The Jeep complex and eminent domain both were newsworthy a couple years ago, as the United States Supreme Court was looking at the specifics of how Toledo handled the eminent domain issue.

From the junction we continue on I-75 as it winds its' way through north Toledo. From the expressway you can look south and see the skyline of downtown Toledo, a rather average collection of tall buildings. Residents of the area know that the skyline looks more spread out when viewed from the north. Most photo ops of the skyline are from the east, gathering in the Maumee River for a bottom frame effect.

That old auto factory mentioned above? As you motor past the remains you will see that the entire collection of old buildings is being torn down. Back in World War II that complex employed 35,000 workers who helped to build the arsenal that won the war.

Just past the old factory complex is another main junction, I-75 and I-475. If you stay on I-75 you will be on a 10-lane expressway that winds through the central city and past downtown Toledo. On this trip we merge onto I-475, now driving west.

Just past the junction we drive between the huge Toledo Hospital complex and the old DeVilbiss High School. If you are a reader of conservative humor (from the pages of Rolling Stone or Playboy) you may recognize the name of P.J. O'Rourke. He was a mid-1960s graduate of DeVilbiss. His writings have included many a memoir of growing-up in Toledo, how sprawl has affected the community, and why The Glass City is a nice place to raise a family. (The high school was closed, due to budget cuts and declining enrollment, about a dozen years ago.)

(Side-bar Bear historical note: When I-475 and I-75 were being built I was living in a duplex in the central city. The wife and I would ride our bicycles over to the traffic-free expressway and use it for a GIANT bike path. :-D )

As you motor west on I-475 you notice that the housing stock is changing from central city dwellings (very close to each other, multi-story, many apartment buildings) to 1940s brick bungalow style. I-475 is 6-lanes to 8-lanes wide in this area, although at Monroe Street the lanes are reduced. Monroe Street is one of the original sprawl avenues.....a testament to the way America embraced the automobile in the 1960s.

Just past the Monroe Street exit is another exit, Secor Road. This exit fed the traffic at what was the area's largest non-central-core shopping district, Westgate. The Westgate area included (and still includes) Westgate Shopping Center, a couple stand-alone department stores, a big box, an office park (with low-rise and high-rise structures), and numerous strip centers.

(Note: The center of the Westgate area still includes a full-service car wash. Think about it!)

As you fly past the Secor Road exit the sound barrier walls continue, including a barrier at Notre Dame high School. Obviously, the traffic gurus do not want the casual traveler to check out Katie Holmes' high school. ;)

Housing stock changes again.....now the back yards of 1960s ranch houses line the expressway and the sound barriers are now short mounds of dirt. A ton of traffic exits at Talmadge Road, most destined for the huge regional mall, Westfield Franklin Park.

West of Talmadge Road I-475 curves and drops into a shallow valley, surrounded by the forests of Wildwood Metro Park and the Camp Maikonda Boy Scout Reservation. Just past the tree line the road has a major junction, I-475 curves to the south and U.S. 23 is accessed by taking the northbound exit.

We curve south, joining the busy outerbelt that is I-475/U.S. 23. This 4-lane expressway was almost obsolete before it was finished.....very heavy traffic, limited exits/entrances. Much of metro Toledo's growth has been along or near this outerbelt.

On this trip we exit I-475 just a mile south of the junction, sliding onto U.S. 20 westbound, Central Avenue. This road, recently widened to 6-lanes to 8-lanes, is one of the busiest spawl avenues in the area. The sprawl continues for a couple of miles as you head west, finally disapating near Centennial Road.

The route to Swanton, OH (a bedroom suburb) is rural from this point. Central Avenue (U.S. 20) motors past golf courses, Secor Metro Park, and plenty of bountiful farm land. The Swanton-bound traveler will stay on Central Avenue for about 10 miles before turning south on one of the county roads.

Swanton, OH.....quiet and peaceful compared to the industrial city we just drove through.....is on the southern horizon.

Bear
 

Bear Up North

Cyburbian Emeritus
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Polar Bear Rant

The cute little polar bear in Germany was in the news again yesterday. The cuddly little guy is in the news all of the time. :)

Yet.....Toledo's incredible Zoo has three.....THREE !!!.....polar bear cubs.

Toledo's Zoo Director did not get on the national news and announce he will be killing the cubbies. Thus.....no attention.
_____

If you are residing in the midwest USA (or just traveling through) and you or your kids want to see three darling polar bear cubs.....check out the Toledo Zoo.

Bear
 

Bear Up North

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Veterans Skyway Bridge

Today was the formal dedication of the new Veterans Glass City Skway Bridge. This bridge will take the place of the drawbridge-style Craig Memorial Bridge, carrying I-280 traffic over the Maumee River, near downtown Toledo. (Not sure, but it might be the last drawbridge on the interstate system.)

The bridge will be open for traffic on Sunday. Tonight the celebration continues, including a light show. News report attached.

It is a nice-looking bridge. Taking some of the "wow" away is the location within a few hundred feet of the Craig Memorial Bridge.

This summer I will try to get some Bear-inspired photos.

http://www.toledoblade.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070621/NEWS11/70621001

Bear
 

lopsidedfrock

Member
Messages
23
Points
2
whoops

whoops
i wanted to do the walk across
oh well

question
how do you pronounce isha laye? i drive/ride my bike past it all the time.
 

Bear Up North

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question
how do you pronounce isha laye? i drive/ride my bike past it all the time.

When we were growing-up in our brick ranch at 3012 Isha Laye, we pronounced it as ISH AHHH LAY. The neighborhood had a large number of Jewish families and the older Jewish folks pronounced it EEEE SHAW LAY.

We moved to the neighborhood, platted as McKondin (not sure of spelling) Heights, in about 1954. Central Avenue, just to the north of us, was a 2-lane highway. The road on the north side of Central Avenue is called Orchard Trail. In the mid-1950s we walked the farm path that became Orchard Trail.....and it really had apple trees.

The neighborhood we moved from (at 1748 Macomber Street) eventually morphed into one of Toledo's tougher parts of town, with a big gang presence. Oddly enough, my first wife and this Bear also lived on Macomber Street, farther west (near Ottawa Park), in an apartment complex.

Bear
 

Bear Up North

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Toledo In The News Again

Toledo, OH, has been in the news again.....for a couple positive reasons.....

Combined Sewer Overflows.....Toledo is one of 740-plus cities in the USA that have combined stormwater-sanitary sewer overflows. Any time there is a heavy rain, the sewer system cannot handle the extra flow, so raw sewage is dumped into the rivers and streams. Most of these cities are the older cities of the country.....the newer cities stayed away from this combo.

Toledo has been getting good reviews from the EPA because voters decided in 2002 to modernize the sewer system. Five years late, good progress has been noted by the EPA.

Best Tasting City Water Effort.....Toledo finished in the top 5 in the USA in a recent "Best Tasting City Water" contest. St. Louis finished 1st.....Toledo, Anaheim, Long Beach, and Colorado Springs were all in the top 5.

Bear
 

DetroitPlanner

Cyburbian Emeritus
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Wow we've had major sewer separator projects going on in metro Detroit for quite some time now. Congrats on helping to clean up our lake Bear!
 

Super Amputee Cat

Cyburbian
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The neighborhood we moved from (at 1748 Macomber Street) eventually morphed into one of Toledo's tougher parts of town, with a big gang presence. Oddly enough, my first wife and this Bear also lived on Macomber Street, farther west (near Ottawa Park), in an apartment complex.

Bear

What's weird though is the the south side of Bancroft - between Upton and Clinton is very stable. High rates of home ownership and few neglected properties. I always wondered why the Auburndale neighborhood declined so fast while the neighborhood across Bancroft (known as Parkside) remains viable.
 

Bear Up North

Cyburbian Emeritus
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What's weird though is the the south side of Bancroft - between Upton and Clinton is very stable. High rates of home ownership and few neglected properties. I always wondered why the Auburndale neighborhood declined so fast while the neighborhood across Bancroft (known as Parkside) remains viable.

Just guessing.....the Auburndale neighborhood was closer to and adjacent to Monroe Street, numerous abandoned storefronts and warehouses. Auburndale was also a traditional grid pattern, for the most part. Parkside seemed to morph (as one moves west) into a neighborhood with larger homes, grand boulevards, and the presence of a huge Catholic plot of land.....Calvary Cemetery, Gesu Church and school, and the former CYO (Catholic Youth Organizations) playing fields. Correct me if wrong.....was the neighborhood between Parkside Boulevard and Upton Avenue called "Westmoreland"?

Bear
 
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