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No Need To GTC: It's Toledo

ofos

Vintage Cyburbian
Messages
8,278
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28
Although this thread is well past it's half-life and decomposing at an increasing rate, does anyone else (Bear, perhaps?) remember a place called the Peppermint Lounge? It was the 60's and the twist was the dance du jour. Underage Michigan students would drive to Toledo to party and drink 3.2% Buckeye beer.
 

Bear Up North

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
9,323
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31
Although this thread is well past it's half-life and decomposing at an increasing rate, does anyone else (Bear, perhaps?) remember a place called the Peppermint Lounge? It was the 60's and the twist was the dance du jour. Underage Michigan students would drive to Toledo to party and drink 3.2% Buckeye beer.

Yes, this Bear remembers The Peppermint Lounge. Hard to believe.....a bar in this area that I didn't get my bruinish paws in to. If I remember correctly, it eventually morphed into a country bar.....and it COULD BE the country bar that is referenced in the song "You Picked A Fine Time To Leave Me, Lucille" (Kenny Rogers).

Same Topic, Slightly: 3.2 beer was popular for Michigan folks. Buckeye beer was atrocious.

Bear
 

ofos

Vintage Cyburbian
Messages
8,278
Points
28
Yes, this Bear remembers The Peppermint Lounge. Hard to believe.....a bar in this area that I didn't get my bruinish paws in to. If I remember correctly, it eventually morphed into a country bar.....and it COULD BE the country bar that is referenced in the song "You Picked A Fine Time To Leave Me, Lucille" (Kenny Rogers).

Same Topic, Slightly: 3.2 beer was popular for Michigan folks. Buckeye beer was atrocious.

Bear

Historical Note: 3.2 was only popular because the drinking age in Michigan was 21 but you could drink 3.2 in OH at 18. No argument about the quality of Buckeye, 3.2 or full strength. Probably the worst beer I had ever experienced until I had Pearl Light here in Texas.
 

Super Amputee Cat

Cyburbian
Messages
2,502
Points
35
Just guessing.....the Auburndale neighborhood was closer to and adjacent to Monroe Street, numerous abandoned storefronts and warehouses. Auburndale was also a traditional grid pattern, for the most part. Parkside seemed to morph (as one moves west) into a neighborhood with larger homes, grand boulevards, and the presence of a huge Catholic plot of land.....Calvary Cemetery, Gesu Church and school, and the former CYO (Catholic Youth Organizations) playing fields. Correct me if wrong.....was the neighborhood between Parkside Boulevard and Upton Avenue called "Westmoreland"?

Bear

No actually I mean Parkside Addition - nothing to to with Parkside Blvd. It's not even next to the park.

Platted around 1915, Parkside is bounded by Upton, Oakwood, Calumet and W. Bancroft and includes the interior streets of Joffre and Parkdale. It was originally in Washington Twp and annexed to Toledo around 1923. The population was all white in 1960 but the first blacks began moving in about 1961. By 1970 the neighborhood was predominantly black.
 

Bear Up North

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
9,323
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31
Port Of Toledo

When the St. Lawrence Seaway first opened, giving the ports of the Great Lakes access to the oceans of the world, Toledo's port enjoyed a considerable jump in tonnage shipped. The port was already the world's largest shipper of coal, loading thousands of tons from the huge KING COAL docks at the mouth of the Maumee River (adjacent-to Maumee Bay, Lake Erie) and sending it to electrical-generating plans throughout the lakes.

Toledo used the Seaway access as a wedge to significantly increase the types of cargo that was inbound and outbound. For a few years, the Port of Toledo was the 9th largest port in the USA.

Fast-forward to the present-day. Toledo is still a shipper of coal, the huge grain elevators lining the Maumee River still provide grain storage for the shiploads that are outbound, and the general cargo docks enjoy "good" years and struggle through" bad years.

This year has been relatively good for general cargo. Even though imports are down (primarily from Germany, usually construction materials) because of the housing slump, the port is enjoying the importing of many shiploads of large metal pipes, being sent to the heartland for construction of a major natural gas line. The huge steel pipes are loaded on railcars for shipment west.

The port has also become a transfer station of sorts. Taconite pellets from iron ore miles in Minnesota (not from the YooPee, dang!) are shipped in the huge lake ships and stored in Toledo. From those storage piles the taconite pellets are loaded onto ocean ships, bound for China. The "Red Commies Who Found Capitalism" need the iron pellets for their working-overtime steel mills.

For those not in the know.....the locks and the Welland Canal are not big enough to allow lake freighters through. That is why the transfer to ocean ships.

Awhile back, the Port of Toledo was also being considered for a huge wind turbine components site. Giant parts from overseas would have been unloaded at the port, additional work and processing would have taken place, and the final assemblies would have been shipped to wind turbine farms in development around the country.

Toledo was not chosen. To my knowledge, warm-weather ports were chosen. That is the big drawback to shipments from and to Great Lakes' ports.....winter weather.

Bear
 

tinkerbelle

Member
Messages
12
Points
1
I didn't read the whole topic, but during the summers I spend time with relatives in Toledo and I've never gotten a chance to really explore the city. I've been to the Old West End and to the areas around Franklin Park Mall and Maumee Country Day School (which is basically sprawl though I LOVE Franklin Park Mall). I also got lost once in an area under a large bridge near downtown Toledo with a large Latino population. I have NO idea what part of town I was in though. What other areas of the city are worth exploring? I've heard that the East and North sides are to be avoided (are they really that bad :-c or better yet what areas of Cleveland do they compare to?)
 

Bear Up North

Cyburbian Emeritus
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9,323
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31
tinkerbelle.....The bridge you were under was most likely the Anthony Wayne Bridge, named for General "Mad" Anthony Wayne, a military man with a ton of influence in the Maumee River valley (from Fort Wayne, IN downstream to Toledo, OH). That area has a mix of old housing stock, apartments, some industry, railroad yards, grain elevators. It is known as "the old south end" and it does have a large number of Latinos.

If you move toward downtown Toledo from that under-the-bridge location you will slide into an area of old warehouses that have been converted to lofts, the Maumee Bay Brewing Company, a few other restaurants and taverns, and the world headquarters (built on the river) of Owens-Corning. You know them by the Pink Panther used in their advertisements.

About a dozen or so years ago there were brand new condominiums standing where Owens-Corning is now. Because Toledo can be a "fun" town, politically, those condos were moved (just like you move a house) onto big barges and floated to somewhere around Sandusky, OH. The Owens-Corning building is an ultra-modern and somewhat strange structure. When OC moved into that building they abandoned their 30-story tower in the center of downtown Toledo's grid street pattern. That building remains an empty 30-story skyscraper.

You mentioned that you have been through the old west end.....what a beautiful neighborhood. Considered one of the largest collections of Victorian residences in the states.

North Toledo can be tough. Because Toledo is much smaller than Cleveland, driving through seemingly tough neighborhoods only take a few minutes. East Toledo is very independent.....the folks on that side of the river tend to disassociate themselves from the west side of the river.

Both north and east Toledo have older housing stocks, some high-crime areas, gang problems, and comfortable and well-kept streets smack in the middle. East Toledo has a ton of industry, including a huge Sun Oil refinery, one of the largest flour mill elevators in the world, extensive brownlands (waiting for redevelopment), and the Port of Toledo's General Cargo facilities.

Do these neighborhoods compare to your Cleveland "hoods".....perhaps on occasion, but so much smaller geographically.

Next time you are in Toledo, check out the usual tourist items, including Tony Packo's (watch 1970s MASH for info on this), the highly-rated Toledo Museum of Art, the wonderful Toledo Zoo. Cruise around the-surrounded-by-Toledo little village of Ottawa Hills. Check out some of the mansions.

Toledo's parks are generally okay (Ottawa Park is great, but stay away at night). The metroparks, though, are incredible. Swan Creek and Wildwood are within the city limits, and a bunch more (including the huge Oak Openings Preserve) surround the area.

If you are in to history, check out Fort Meigs in Perrysburg (a suburb).....largest rebuilt wooden stockade in the country.....or wander over to the site of "The Battle Of Fallen Timbers". That battle here solidified the western expansion of a then-very-young USA.

(If you like or dislike shopping.....just south of the battle site they are building a large shopping center.)

Toledo has a mini-version of The Flats (Cleveland's famous riverside watering hole line-up).....in Toledo it is called "The Docks". Quite popular in the warmer months, not as popular in the colder months.

For real adventure, drive across the new Veteran's Skyway in Toledo (I-280). It just opened a few months ago and it is the largest single expenditure in Ohio highway funding history. (Finally, some state dollars came our way.)

If you are looking for an authentic Ohio State Buckeyes bar, go to Dale's Bar in the inner-ring suburb of Maumee. This Bear is a Michigan fan but I have been a regular at that "Buckeye" place since Richard Nixon was President.

Hope you enjoy Toledo the next time you are in town.

Bear
 

Bear Up North

Cyburbian Emeritus
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9,323
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31
Toledo Retail Update / Regional Co-Op

Metropolitan Toledo now has a second "lifestyle center" retail complex. It opened its' doors yesterday (10-3-07) to huge crowds. It is known as The Shops At Fallen Timbers. Not all of the retail venues are open, as construction continues.....but the eventual site will have about 85 stores in over one million square feet.

Evidently, the economy in the area is strong enough to support two new lifestyle centers. The other is only a few miles away, in the same southwestern suburbs portion of the Toledo metro.

The Fallen Timbers complex will also eventually have an office building park, movie theaters, and at least one new hotel. The site is just south of the area's only full cloverleaf interchange, the junction of I-475/US23 and US24.

The site has been in the news for about ten years. Originally, Toledo officials purchased land in this area as a possible site for a new Jeep Assembly Plant. To keep the proposed plant within Toledo corporate limits, they planned on an easement slice, cutting in and around the suburb of Maumee, OH. After numerous legal battles, the city of Toledo gave up on that plan.

The land was purchased by a businessman from Bryan, OH.....a small city about an hour west of Toledo. He eventually worked out a deal with one of the nation's largest shopping center developers and construction began.

Adjacent to the site is a historic battlefield, where "The Battle of Fallen Timbers" effectively changed the course of USA westward expansion.

Meanwhile, Toledo's huge (and very successful) Westfield Franklin Park Mall continues to expand. Retail watchers are having some fun seeing how all of this will turn-out, especially because what was once south Toledo's premier shopping destination, Southwyck Mall, is so close to death you cannot hear it breathing.
_____

Meanwhile.....Fedex has a large distribution center located in west Toledo. The property is somewhat landlocked, with no room for expansion.....and is not as close to an interstate highway as the owners would prefer.

For awhile, Toledo government officials played hardball in their attempts to force Fedex to stay within the corporate limits. When that battle failed, Toledo officials displayed a rare moment of regional cooperation, assisting with Fedex' detail planning for a new distribution center in Rossford, OH, a suburb with immediate access to I-75.
_____

Always fun to watch the events in my old home town.

Bear
 

Bear Up North

Cyburbian Emeritus
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9,323
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31
Toledo Randoms

Random 1 - Just-in-case-you-didn't-know Department.....the sandy soil in parts of NW Ohio and SE Michigan are great for growing Christmas trees. There are a good number of Christmas tree farms in the area. Good friends of mine have a Christmas tree farm in Deerfield, MI, about 25 miles northwest of Toledo.

Random 2 - One of the largest corporations in the world that is involved in retirement centers, Manor Care, is located in downtown Toledo. As of this writing it is the 4th largest Toledo corporation.....but that is expected to change this week, when a private equity firm assumes control.

Random 3 - Phoenix-based First Solar actually has its' roots in the Toledo area. Because of Toledo's long involvement with glass.....especially flat glass.....the technology for solar panels was oft-blessed with the technological know-how of some famous area inventors.

One of the largest manufacturing plants for solar panels is located in suburban Perrysburg.

Random 4 - Toledo is a wonderful location for distribution. The area is at the junction of two of the busiest interstate highways in the country (I-75 & I-80-90), is one of the largest ports on the Great Lakes, is the nation's 3rd largest rail center, and is very-centrally located for distribution to major population centers.

The area does have a signifiicant number of distribution centers and more are under construction or on the drawing board.

If you have contact with folks in your business community who may be making decisions regarding a new midwestern distribution facility.....take a strong look at the benefits to the Toledo area.

(Yes.....I understand that you will be pushing YOUR area first and foremost. But if you hear of "additional" centers, look toward the friendly areas of northwestern Ohio.)

Random 5 - Kind of interesting.....Toledo is a typical rust-belt city, with all of the problems that falling into that category bring. Yet.....the area is home to companies that will certainly make a difference in the future.....retirement homes (for our aging population).....solar panel technology.....high-tech high-throughput distribution (such as Walgreens DC).

Bear
 

Bear Up North

Cyburbian Emeritus
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9,323
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A Couple More Awards

A week or so ago, Toledo finished 3rd in a competition for "most liveable community", at the Global Liveable Community Awards held in London. Interesting.

You could argue that many (much more "liveable") communites did not even bother to enter the competition. The judging included scores for community sustainability, enhancement of landscape, heritage management, environmentally-sensitive practices, healthy lifestyles, and planning for the future.

First place went to Malmo, Sweden and second place went to Lyon, France.

Reading about Malmo, there are some interesting similarities.....and some major differences.

Malmo was primarily a typical factory town, with shipbuilding as the big component. As that industry moved away from Malmo, the city experienced very tough economic conditions.....including the highest unemployment in Sweden (in the 1980s and early 1990s).
Malmo's population dropped during the tough times but has surged of late.

Toledo has the same sort of industrial background, peaked in population in the 1970s (nearly 400,000) and now continues to lose citizens at a fast pace. Malmo now has 270,00 and Toledo now has 295,000.

Big difference? Young people "dig" Malmo. It is considered a "hip" place to be, it has a youth-oriented culture, the citizens are almost-all avid bicyclists, the downtown area is filled with apartments.....on and on.

Another big advantage for Malmo.....it is now a bedroom suburb (even though it is its' own metro) of Copenhagen, Denmark. A huge bridge was built that links Malmo and Copenhagen.

Congratulations to Toledo for a nice effort.
_____

Waterville, OH, a bedroom suburb of Toledo, was recently placed on a list of (not excactly sure of title) "Best Small Towns To Raise A Family". It finished in the Top 10.

It is a nice little town, hugging the Maumee River.
_____

I am a regular Googler, but I cannot find a site that lists ALL of the different awards that cities receive. There are so many awards, contests, lists, etc.

Bear
 

craines

Cyburbian
Messages
578
Points
17
I entered into this late but my moms side of the family is from Toledo. My uncle, Charlie Browm (no kidding) was a prominent attorney there that live in Ottawa Hills ( i may be mistaken but it was a well to do area on the west end of town). I loved the area and my cool anuts and uncles still live there. Totally sweet architecture and what always struck me as interesting in that, at least in ottawa hills, there was no fencing seperating the lots.
 

Traveler

Member
Messages
1
Points
0
Lots of Potential but...........

Just spent the weekend downtown. Nice area at the Docks. Food pretty good - have been to this City several times.
Gut wrenching to see the empty buildings and stores.
Looks like some Leadership is required....
Just an outside observation. The City seems very clean and tidy. Some roads could be remedied....to prevent hurt to drivers of smaller vehicles. :)
Hope it gets back on track. The people we spoke with are all very concerned.

So- Toledoins: Go for it! You can do it.
 

Bear Up North

Cyburbian Emeritus
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31
More Toledo

Traveler.....Leadership is a tough find in Toledo, although there are occasional snippets. Many Toledo folks know (and brag about) the many assets BUT head on down the highway at the first opportunity. Not unlike many other places in the midwest and Great Lakes.

craines.....Ottawa Hills is a pretty classy place. When I was in Catholic grade school (Gesu) our parish included Ottawa Hills, so I knew a ton of those rich dudes. Good friends even had a bowling alley in their basement.

Ottawa Hills is still considered a prestigious address in this area. (Menioned before.....Tom Sholz, front man for the classic rock group Boston, was from OH. I used to play basketball with him, before he got rich and famous and before I got old and not rich and famous.)
_____

This past week, Dana Corporation, one of the few remaining Fortune 500 companies in the Toledo area, emerged from bankruptcy. They are now going to concentrate on auto and truck parts that are located UNDER the vehicle.....drive trains, trannies, axles, etc.

Bear
 

Bear Up North

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
9,323
Points
31
Building Solar Panels

The Metropolitan Toledo Area is becoming a center for the manufacture of solar panels. Even though (obviously) not a sun-belt location, metro Toledo now has three plants that will be manufacturing these panels. The attachment is related to our community being a center for glass manufacturing for about a century, a leader in research in the glass-related technoligies (of which solar panels can relate to), and the solar panel developments that have gone on at the University of Toledo.

Last year's fastest growing stock was First Solar. That Phoenix-based corporation has a plant in suburban Perrysburg. If you are on I-80/I-90 (Ohio Turnpike) you can see the new plant from the road.

Another corporation is going to be producing solar panels at a plant on Nebraska Avenue, in Toledo. And this week another corporation announced that they will be building solar panels at a relatively-new manufacturing plant in Perrysburg. That plant was originally built to manufacture components for television sets.

Bear
 

Bear Up North

Cyburbian Emeritus
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9,323
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The Land Of 50,000 Potholes

Not certain exactly how many street potholes our unusually tough winter has left us with. The numbers thrown around by Toledo officials and county officials certainly are in the tens-of-thousands.

For those of you who live in climates that don't enjoy the 4-season nature that we here in NW Ohio enjoy (and many other areas)......those street potholes occur when there is continual freezing and thawing, especially when accompanied-with moisture.

The streets and roads with potholes beat the hexx out of you when you motor your way to wherever you are headed. Some potholes can be 6 to 8 inches deep. Imagine hitting that with your front tire while you are going 45mph !!!

In Toledo, the mayor has declared "war" on potholes and had city crews working mucho-overtime to provide temporary patches.

Bear
 

Bear Up North

Cyburbian Emeritus
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31
Creekwalk

Toledo has just announced that they have entered into an agreement with a planning firm to develop a "riverwalk" along a small Toledo creek. Details.....

The California-based planning group, Tetra Tech, developed the San Antonio Riverwalk, developed similar projects in Memphis, Owensboro, and Kansas City, and is working on a major Los Angeles project. Sounds like Tetra Tech will eventually grab ownership of some Toledo properties, as part of the deal.

The proposed riverwalk.....actually a "creekwalk".....will include a waterfront promenade, retail, offices, and homes. As with all proposals, the drawing looked very good......but there are some realities that have to be faced.

Swan Creek enters the Maumee River in downtown Toledo. The final mile or so of the creek, upriver from the mouth, has been a favorite dumping ground for old washing machines, an occasional vehicle, once-in-a-while a body, and other assorted goodies. The water clarity has improved, though, thanks to tighter environmental restictions.

Many years ago I read in Michigan History Magazine that the original site for the University of Michigan was going to be at the mouth of Swan Creek. That was in a period before statehood and Michigan and Ohio were almost at war for what was called "The Toledo Strip".

Critics of this new plan argue that the deal has too many loopholes that would allow Tetra Tech to abandon the project. Because of Toledo's finicky weather, I would argue that a "creekwalk" may not be successful.

Bear
 

DetroitPlanner

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
6,238
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27
Bear,

Will they be doing the all that links Owens Corning/Portside with the zoo? I can see that being a great benefit as there would be great nodes along the way such as parks and the farmer's market. I looked into this and it looks like Tetra-Tech will be taking over the operations of the Market as part of the deal. The last time I was there, the Market was not doing so good. Lets hope that they can turn it around.

There are literally thousands of folk who walk along the Detroit Riverfront every day. I don't think cold will be much of a factor, though days with ice on the walk is a different story. Detroit has a similar type of project that will link our Eastern Market with the Waterfront/GM Headquarters. It is being built along a below grade railroad right of way. http://www.modeldmedia.com/features/dequindre.aspx
 

Bear Up North

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
9,323
Points
31
More Toledo News

This Bear was at a dinner banquet this past week and the keynote speaker was Lucas County Commissioner Tina Skeldon-Wozniak. Her presentation, co-presented with a construction company executive, focused on the now-under-construction Lucas County Arena. She proudly proclaimed that Toledo will be the smallest city with an entertainment "trifecta" in the central business district. That "trifecta" includes.....

Lucas County Arena
Under construction.....on the site of what was one of this Bear's favorite Chinese restraurants (Golden Lily).....the nation's first "green" arena

Fifth Third Field
Opened about six years ago.....considered the "best" minor league baseball park by national publications.....always at or near capacity

Seagate Centre
Convention center that opened about twenty years ago.....a little small, so did not get bigger convention biz.....that should change with Arena opening

All three of these venues are in the same general area of CBD. Check out this link.....

http://www.lucascountyarena.com/

Toledo ain't so bad. (Can that be our new slogan? ;))

Bear
 

Bear Up North

Cyburbian Emeritus
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Bear, what will happen to the old arena? Will the City/County extend the riverwalk area?

The Toledo Sports Arena, built in 1948, has been removed from this earth. The building was a joke, although it was appropriate for minor-league hockey, primarily because of the small ice surface and the crowds virtually on-top of the skaters. This Bear attended many concerts in that facility. The acoustics were horrible, the ceilings were way too low (maybe 30-feet), creating line-of-sight issues with the concert stage.

The parcel that the Sports Arena sat on what will be part of the quite-impressive Marina District. That district, apparently using a combination of private developer and public funding, will eventually include more riverwalk areas, a small ampitheater, retail and (hopefully) housing. There is even discussion of establishing a mooring facility for cruise ships that ply the Great Lakes.

When all is said and done, Toledo's eastern side of the Maumee River (not the downtown side of the river) will include the Willis Boyer (a lake freighter, open for public tours), The Docks (six on-the-water restaurants, open since the late 1990s), and the Marina District. My guess is that this is about a 2-mile stretch of public access to the riverfront and riverfront attractions.

Attachment (link) is a couple years old. There have been some changes and construction continues.

Bear
http://www.toledoblade.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20051012/NEWS09/51012002
 

Bear Up North

Cyburbian Emeritus
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9,323
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31
NW Ohio Intermodal Center

Last night this Bear attended a special intermodal presentation. It was presented by one of the members of an investment group that purchased land adjacent to Toledo Express Airport. That purchase took place about a dozen years ago. The property has excellent potential for an intermodal center. And now local newspapers and one of the local talk radio stations have been pushing for area officials to start making the moves to make this staggering project a reality.

What Is An Intermodal Center?
An intermodal center is a large facility with railyards and highway access. Containers filled with products manufactured overseas are off-loaded from the trains and placed on special sets of wheels, creating a road-ready trailer.

Toledo Express Airport
Passenger service at Toledo Express Airport continues to plummet. It has lost 50% of its' passengers since 2001 and with the present state of the airline business it will continue to lose passenger traffic. However, Toledo Express (with very long runways) is home to the huge BAX Global distribution hub, creating more than 1000 jobs for area residents. BAX is now owned by a European company that specializes in intermodal logistics. Every day and night the area skies are filled with the huge jumbo freightliners going to-and-from BAX Global.

The airport's master plan calls for a parallel runway (also at 10,600 feet) and considerable development, south of the present airport. The areas to the south and west of Toledo Express are primarily forest land, so the facility is not boxed-in like so many other airports. If the airport experienced considerable growth there is plenty of acreage for warehousing and value-added services (such as a Foreign Trade Zone).

Also important to note that Toledo Express' air traffic controllers control only two airports.....Toledo Express and a small rural airport. This allows quick access to-and-from the skies, as compared to giant airports in Detroit and Chicago.

The Intermodal Property
The land in the proposal is directly across Airport Highway from the airport. It includes frontage on the Norfolk & Western Railroad's main line and is directly adjacent to the Swanton/Toledo Airport Ohio Turnpike Interchange. That link with I-80/I-90 would include a special access for the intermodal center, providing direct access to the nation's transportation network.

Some Demographics
I-80/I-90 is considered by most to be the nation's main east-west interstate. Just a short distance to the east is I-75, considered by most to be the nation's main north-south interstate. A huge percentage of the nation's manufacturing is located within a 2-day drive of the proposed center. A large percentage of the nation's population is located within a 2-day drive of the proposed center.

Moving The Container Trains
If the intermodal center was now functioning, railcars with double-stacked containers (double-stacked on special "low-boy" flat cars) would arrive via the adjacent-to-the-property tracks. Containers would be unloaded in Prince Rupert, BC or Vancouver, BC, both excellent ports and both at a much-shorter distance from Asian shipping ports than southern California ports. Canadian National Raiload would transport those containers across Canada and (most likely) enter the states through Michigan. Canadian National has a huge railyard in north Toledo that would be part of the logistical routing for the containers.

CN could also enter the U.S. through the northern plains and proceed to Chicago for sortation (including sortation to Toledo's Intermodal). Routing from southern California ports and routing through Chicago adds a number of days to the transit time, so the most efficient service is across Canada.

Nova Scotia Container Port
A huge container port is being built in Nova Scotia, capable of off-loading the world's newest and largest "super" container ships. CN will transport those containers to a number of distant locations, including across Canada and into the U.S. in Michigan. That routing, with another couple shipping days lopped-off, would follow the path through CN's Toledo Yard and over to the Intermodal Center.

In a world that needs to maximize logistic efficiencies, ocean ships that transport the St. Lawrence Seaway would be retrofitted to carry a number of containers in addition to their regular cargo. The best choice for those containers would be to unload at the largest port (in acreage) on the Great Lakes, Toledo. The Port of Toledo also has the largest cranes on the lakes.

Exports
Containers can be used to export products from the states and the NW Ohio area has a ready stockpile of regular exports: grains, hardwood lumber, and coal. "Back-hauling" is an efficient part of global trade and that efficiency could be grabbed with very few problems.

Alliance Global Logistics
The group that presented last night's program met with Ross Perot, JR......ten years ago! In those years, Perot's Alliance Global Logistics has transformed a declining-passenger airport (Ft. Worth) into a huge intermodal center with hundreds of companies and 27,000 employees. The data for Toledo Express and Alliance is very similar.

And the Toledo intermodal has the advantage of the nation's busiest interstates and the large Port of Toledo!

Ten years ago Ross Perot, JR said, "What are you waiting for?"

Politics
The comments and fireworks at last night's session underline the fact that the "powers" in Northwestern Ohio really struggle to get things done. Included in the political mix is the Mayor of Toledo.......with his head in the sand as he stalls on providing any kind of leadership for this important project.

Ultimately, the intermodal decision will be made by the railroad. With all of the obvious benefits to the proposed location it is hoped that local officials can get their act together and present their case......now!.

Personal Note
My distribution company gets most of its' containers via Vancouver via Detroit. We are bringing in 3-9 containers per/week.

Bear
 

Bear Up North

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lopsidedfrock......Great picture tour, bringing back a ton of memories. No doubt I have been in some of those homes.....I went to Gesu Catholic Elementary School for six years (in the mid-to-late 1950s). Old Orchard is in the Gesu district.

One of my first girlfriends, Linda, lived on Densmore Drive. Another great friend lived on Darlington Road.

In addition to your photo-spread, I enjoyed the comments on the urbanohio forum.

Bear
 

Bear Up North

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More Toledo News

Changes in the world of health care and automobile manufacturing are directly responsible for these latest news bits from metro Toledo.....

Dana Corporation is the metro's largest Fortune 500 company. The giant automobile/truck parts manufacturer has announced that they are selling their huge (and quite palatial) headquarters building. The large colonial structure, set on a gently-rolling and wooded site in west Toledo, is now deemed "too ornate" for the struggling automobile parts business.

Dana recently built a tech center building in the inner-ring suburb of Maumee. They plan to move corporate to that facility, after some enhancements and additions. Their new address will list home as "Maumee, OH".

Years ago, corporate Toledo limits included Dana, Owens-Illinois, Libbey-Owens-Ford, Champion Spark Plug, Owens-Corning, Questor, and Sheller-Globe. Believe that at one time or another they were all Fortune 500 companies, headquartered in Toledo. Over the years consolidation, bancruptcy, and corporate flight took their tolls. From that list, after Dana's move to the suburbs, only Owens-Corning remains in corporate limits Toledo, in a sprawling and modern riverfront building on the edge of the downtown CBD. The other metro Fortune 500 company, Owens-Illinois, exited downtown Toledo a couple years ago, after building a new campus-style headquarters in outer-ring suburb Perrysburg.

The Dana property also originally included Dana Credit Corporation. When that entity went away (a number of years ago) their building, with a side entrance to the large estate-like property, waqs sold to a medical insurance group. The sale of the main buildings (and the front entrance) was to another large corporation, Healthcare REIT. That downtown Toledo corporation is one of the world's largest equity owners of healthcare properties and retirement properties. They will exit their CBD headquarters and occupy the Dana property.

For those who follow golf.....Dana's present complex is across Dorr Street from one of the world's most famous courses, Inverness. That beautiful golf course has been the home of a number of prestigious events, including some Opens, PGAs, and senior events. Older fans probably remember "Hinkle's Tree" from an Open years ago.....a golfer took a shortcut over another fairway to get to a green quicker. Overnight, the PGA and Inverness erected a tree, preventing a replay of that trick.

http://www.golftoday.co.uk/news/yeartodate/news03/hinkle.html

Bear
 

mosely74

Member
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New developments in Toledo

Here are some new developments in or around downtown Toledo. The new sports arena is well on its way (view a recent rendering at: http://i27.photobucket.com/albums/c198/DowntownZack/Toledo/toledo.jpg). It is believed that this exciting new development will be a catalyst for business and entertainment development in downtown Toledo. As the project nears completion, talk of an entertainment district which centers on the area are being discussed. The Toledo Blade has reported that some developers are rediscovering the potential of the long-abandoned Fiberglass Tower. Some proposals that have been submitted to the city include turning the abandoned skyscraper into a mixed use project of apartments and shops.

Tetra Tech, the developers behind the very successful Riverwalk project in San Antonio are seriously eyeing Swan Creek for a similar developments. The Erie Street market, which abuts Swan Creek, would be included in the deal and redeveloped. (here is a link to the article: http://www.toledoblade.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080425/NEWS16/804250347/-1/NEWS)

A new cruise terminal has been constructed on the west side of the Maumee River on the north end of downtown Toledo to accommodate large passenger ships. Jet Express (the speed boat-ferry that shuttles people top and from the Lake Erie Islands - notably Put-In-bay) has already conducted trial run from the terminal.

On the other side of the river, the Marina District project is also under construction. This development will contain docks, shops, lofts and an amphitheater. The project has hit a few snags since groundbreaking, but appears to still be a go.

Toledo has indeed experienced some set backs in recent decades, as most rust belt cities have. It's certainly time for a little good news and I think these recent developments serve as a reminder that Toledo may be down, but we are definitely not out! Here's to the future!
 

Bear Up North

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Bed & Breakfast

Yesterday, Katie and all the folks from her office, attended a business meeting that was held at one of Toledo's historic mansions. See link, below.

She loved the place, coming back with stories about the floors, the woodwork, the incredible built-in buffet. Katie did comment that it was not that comfortable for an all-day business meeting, though, because of folding chairs and warm rooms.

Now she is talking about refinishing our built-in buffet. When we purchased our home about a dozen years ago that buffet had been painted.....yes, painted.....with a milky brown color. She has always talked about refinishing it......yesterday's biz meeting may be the poke she needed.

The mansion is a bed and breakfast, also available for meetings. It is located in Toledo's historic "old west end", one of the largest collections of turn-of-the-century mansions in the states. Friends of mine used to own a very-similar mansion, on the same Toledo street but a bit farther north. When I first saw the picture I thought it was my friend's house.

http://www.mansionviewtoledo.com/

Bear
 

Bear Up North

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Job Cuts

Unfortunately, Toledo was in the national news again.....job loss related.

Last week, Chrysler Corporation announced that the 2nd Shift at Toledo's huge (and new) assembly plant was being cut. That puts more than 800 employees out of work. Those employees were manufacturing Jeeps and some Dodge trucks.

Today, a Toledo plant that cuts and distributes corrugated cardboard bit the dust. That closing will mean a job loss for nearly 100 employees.

Of course, any economist-wanna-be knows that for every 1000 job cuts you will have (at the least) another 1000 folks who lose their jobs......sooner or later.
_____

Personal note: I am always proud to report good news on this thread. I always feel bad when I have to report the bad news.

Bear
 

Bear Up North

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GM, The River & A Dead Mall

Few more Metro Toledo tidbits.....

General Motors Powertrain.....GM has a huge plant in northwest Toledo, employing thousands. Considered the most productive automobile parts plant in the United States. Currently in the middle of a major expansion. Locals are wondering what will happen if GM slides into bankruptcy.

The Marina District.....Toledo has torn down its' very old Sports Arena and a number of other structures that line the Maumee River's eastern bank, from the Martin Luther King Bridge downstream to the new I-280 signature skyway bridge. New infrastructure is being installed, including roads, water, etc. A boat marina has been completed and an adjacent tour/passenger boat terminal. The original plans, dubbed "The Marina District", called for retail, housing, night life, water-orientated businesses, etc. Toledo's Mayor attempted to convince Bass Pro to build a huge store at that site. (They chose suburban Rossford, adjacent to the Ohio Turnpike and I-75.)

The developer working with the city has also been involved in a very successful "lifestyle center" in outer-ring bedroom suburb, Perrysburg. Because of the state of our world's financial institutions, his credit line for the Maumee River project is now in doubt. Changes will probably be made to the plans, most likely downsizing changes. The attachment is most likely pre-horrible financial market.

http://www.360ipt.com/MarinaDistrict_OhToledo.htm

Southwyck Dead Mall.....Southwest Toledo's Southwyck Mall bit the dust earlier in the year. The same developer involved in the Marina Project is involved in a proposed rejuvenation of the area that includes the former big mall. The mall will be torn down, a boulevard will go through the property, and retail and housing will be plopped-in. However, the financial market mess has also put this project on a back burner that is now reading "maybe in 2011...".

Bear
 
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--> RETOOLING TOLEDO for a Promising Economic Future in the SOLAR POWER INDUSTRY <--

Libbey-Owens-Ford Glass Company grabbed by England's Pilkington.
Pilkington was mentioned once in this thread--here, in your initial post on February 16, 2004.

The company was never mentioned again, but its collaborative endeavors in the solar power industry may well bring a promising economic future to Toledo::)
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/02/business/02wind.html?pagewanted=4

Summary (my boldfing):
. . . IN Toledo, the declining auto industry has prompted a retooling. For more than a century, the city has been dominated by glass-making, but the problems of Detroit automakers have softened demand for car windows from its plants. . .

Now, Toledo is harnessing its glass-making skills to carve out a niche in solar power. At the center of the trend is a huge glass maker, Pilkington...

Half of Pilkington’s business is in the automotive industry. In the last two years, that business is down 30 percent in North America. But the solar division, started two years ago, is growing at a 40 percent clip annually.

Nearby, the University of Toledo aims to play the same enabling role in solar power that Stanford played at the dawn of the Internet. It has 15 faculty members researching solar power. By licensing the technologies spawned in its labs, the university encourages its academics to start businesses.

One company started by a professor, Xunlight, is developing thin and flexible solar cells. It has 65 employees and expects to have as many as 150 by the middle of next year.

“It’s a second opportunity,” says an assembly supervisor, Matt McGilvery, one of Xunlight’s early hires. . .

“The hope is that two years from now everything is smoking and that envelope will slide across the table,” he says. “The money that people are dumping into this tells me it’s a huge market.”
Bear, as this was published in New York- what is your "insider":) opinion?
 

Bear Up North

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More Toledo

Seana.....Yes, Pilkington, Xunlight, and First Solar are all getting good air play from their positive steps in the solar field. The University of Toledo is heavily involved, too. The school has three campuses, all relatively close to each other. The school has been purchasing property between the main campus (always listed in the Top 20 in scenic campuses) and the Scott Park campus, just a couple miles distant. Technology companies have already jumped into what is a virtual and a real "technology corridor".
_____

The Mayor of Toledo was required by law to release the latest municipal budget. That Saturday release included millions of dollars of cuts, including layoffs in most city divisions. Revenue is down, no surprise in a community that has lost so many jobs. Already there are locals with torches and pitchforks heading for city hall. :-c;)

BTW....."city hall" is in reality a tall office tower (22 floors and 1970s fugly) that includes state and city offices.
_____

Mentioned before.....Toledo will be one of the only cities in the states to have these three types of venues next to each other.....baseball park, convention center, all-purpose arena. The arena is under-construction, the others are done.

Playing minor league hockey in the arena will be the Toledo Walleye. Today brought the announcement that the arena football team will be called the Toledo Bullfrogs.
_____

Toledo has been oft-called "Frogtown". Seems the little jumpers were everywhere when the original settlers drained "The Great Black Swamp" and set-up show in the place eventually called "Toledo".

Bear
 
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The Economic Revitalization of Toledo thru its Raging Solar Power Industry

Seana.....Yes, Pilkington, Xunlight, and First Solar are all getting good air play from their positive steps in the solar field. The University of Toledo is heavily involved, too. The school has three campuses, all relatively close to each other. The school has been purchasing property between the main campus (always listed in the Top 20 in scenic campuses) and the Scott Park campus, just a couple miles distant. Technology companies have already jumped into what is a virtual and a real "technology corridor".
Bear, how would you feel about a separate thread with the title similar to the ^^above in the Planning and Built Environment section of Cyburbia?

Alternatively, do you think that it should be moved into an existing thread, such as Maister's Planning for new energy technology?

This being a planning website, this aspect of Toledo should be greatly expanded upon and critiqued by planners. Just my humble opinion.:) What say you, Bear?
 

Bear Up North

Cyburbian Emeritus
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The Toledo War

I have mentioned "The Toledo War" before.....possibly in this thread and possibly in other threads. Allow me to mention it again.

Reason for the re-mention? Glad you asked. A Christmas present from Katie was a book called "The Toledo War". Since Christmas Eve (gift-exchange time in our household) I have been reading the book. Being a NW Ohio resident and a bit of a history/geography buff, I already knew the basic details. However, this book dives into the real details......a ton of details.....all pertinent.

For those who don't know, in the late 1700s and early 1800s the map that was used by the newbie U.S. goverment to help with westward expansion had a major error.....Lake Michigan's bottom tip was placed many miles north of where it actually was. Government surveyors, determining the north boundary of Ohio (admitted to the Union in 1803) pronounced the state line to run from that bottom tip of Lake Michigan eastward to Lake Erie.

In the 1830s, Michigan was a territory that wanted to be a state. The state of Ohio and the territory of Michigan disagreed on the location of the state line. The disputed terriroty was called "The Toledo Strip". Michigan sent an armed militia to the disputed area and confronted Ohio-paid surveyors, at a farm just a few miles from my Swanton home. There was a minor skirmish that included a volley of musketfire. The Ohio contingent retreated to Perrysburg, OH, some miles distant.

There were some other minor skirmishes, but nobody was really hurt in this "War Between The States". (Michigan was really just a territory at this time.)

The President, ex-Presidents, and Congress all became participants in deciding the location of the state line. Because of the building tension about slavery, part of the agreement reached included allowing both Arkansas (slave state) and Michigan (free state) to both enter the union. Ohio was allowed to reclaim "The Toledo Strip", including the access to Lake Erie's best harbor, Maumee Bay. Michigan was awarded the western 2/3rds of the Upper Peninsula. (Michigan would learn to appreciate that "booby prize"......the YooPee was filled with iron ore, copper, and hardwoods for building an expanding country.)

Side-note: Two miles north of my Swanton home is a road called "Old State Line Road". Yep......it really was the state line once-upon-a-time.

Side-note 2: In downtown Toledo, at the mouth of Swan Creek as it joins the Maumee River, is a plot of land that originally was going to be the location for The University of Michigan. Once-upon-a-time.

"Toledo War" Linky>

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toledo_War

Bear
 

Bear Up North

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Toledo Population Change

The Census Bureau has changed the population estimate for Toledo. The updated population is 316,851. That is now the official estimate from the Bureau's population estimate tables from July 1, 2007. Toledo jumps ahead of three cities with this announcement. Here's how Toledo fits into the updated estimates.....

57. Toledo (316,851)
58. Bakersfield, CA (315,837)
59. Aurora, CO (311,794)
60. Pittsburgh, PA (311,218)

Toledo was ranked at number 60, with an original estimate of 295,029.

The change is the result of a push by Toledo's mayor and some other civic leaders, and the assistance of a Washington-based non-profit, Social Compact. Inc. The city's argument that spurred the new estimate included under-counting of mobile home park residents, group home residents, and some (possible) miscalculations related to building permits for single-family and multi-family.

Estimates in the increase in federal dollars due to the higher population are in the range of $15 million.
_____

This Bear is skeptical about the increase "holding" when the 2010 Census hits the pavement. I believe Toledo will drop into the 280,000 range......a guesstimate on my part, thinking about smaller family size, suburban flight (even with the housing cost issue), and a continuing parade of folks leaving the area around the Great Lakes.
_____

Toledo is a small metro, though. Cities such as Dayton and Grand Rapids have a much smaller central core city.....but they have suburbs that are more numerous and more heavily-populated than Toledo.

Bear
 

Bear Up North

Cyburbian Emeritus
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Site Selection Kudos

The prestigious Site Selection magazine has again picked Ohio as the best state for attracting new and expanded corporate sites. Ohio has finished first the last three years.....and finished in the top spot in four out of six years. Here are the latest state rankings.....

1. Ohio
2. Texas
3. Michigan
4. Pennsylvania
5. North Carolina
6. New York
7. Virginia
8. Illinois
9. Kentucky
10. Indiana

Odd, Ohio and Michigan......the states hit the hardest with unemployment and plant closings in the last few years.....have exhibited a penchant for attracting new business. My guess.....when you are way down you fight even harder.

No surpise that Texas is on that list. Same with North Carolina. And look at all of the states that are on the Great Lakes! :)
_____

For metropolitan areas between 250,000 and 1,000,000.....Toledo finished third! :)

Here are the rankings for metros of that size.....

1. Dayton
2. Akron
3. Toledo
4. Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton
5. Des Moines
6. Grand Rapids
7. Greensboro-High Point (TIE)
7. Tulsa (TIE)
9. Younsgtown-Warren
10. Omaha
_____

Bear
 

Bear Up North

Cyburbian Emeritus
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All-American Budget Woes

Toledo's newest budget is showing a shortfall of "somewhere" between $15 million and $30 million. Officials continue to argue about the deficit's size. No argument with anybody, though, that decreased tax revenues (due to the recession) are the big reason.

The Mayor and all of the announced candidates are all in "argument mode", related to how to balance the budget. The usual......cut back in services, cut back in employee hours, renegotiate (or suspend!) union contracts, change trash service fees, lay-off employees.

Today, the Mayor is trying to prove that no city monies will be utilized to send officials to an awards ceremony. Toledo is a finalist in the "All-American City" pageant. (Toledo has won this award a few times.)

Bear
 

traceyk

Member
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0
Hi Bear and all--
I'm a new member and I have a question about downtown Toledo:

Back in the 80's my husband used to visit friends in Toledo and they would hang out at a sort of mall/galleria down by the river next to Promenade Park. Our son is attending UT in the fall and on a campus visit we decided to check it out. But it's empty. Anyone know what happened? It's a beautiful building and an interesting area.
Tracey
 

Bear Up North

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Hi Bear and all--
I'm a new member and I have a question about downtown Toledo:

Back in the 80's my husband used to visit friends in Toledo and they would hang out at a sort of mall/galleria down by the river next to Promenade Park. Our son is attending UT in the fall and on a campus visit we decided to check it out. But it's empty. Anyone know what happened? It's a beautiful building and an interesting area.
Tracey

Welcome to Cyburbia. :)

The building you mention is probably what is now known as the Toledo Science Center. Originally it was called Portside Festival Marketplace, developed by the Rouse Company. Nice to look at, fun to be in during warmer months.....something like this doesn't work in a rust-belt 4-season climate town. Portside died after a few years and a Center for Science and Industry (COSI) filled the space. Eventually funding ran out and it closed....after a few attempts at levy money.

Finally, a levy passed.....and in late 2009 the building will reopen as the Toledo Science Center.
_____

Hey, next time you are in the area, try the Mexican food at Loma Linda's, west of Toledo (by the airport). I might even be there!

Bear
 

Mud Princess

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Hey, next time you are in the area, try the Mexican food at Loma Linda's, west of Toledo (by the airport). I might even be there!

Bear

Wish I'd known about that one! I was at a beautiful recreational area called Oak Openings last week... We ended up stopping at a chain restaurant in suburban Sandusky for dinner on the way back to our hotel. I'll have to keep that in mind if I ever come out that way again. :)
 

Bear Up North

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Wish I'd known about that one! I was at a beautiful recreational area called Oak Openings last week... We ended up stopping at a chain restaurant in suburban Sandusky for dinner on the way back to our hotel. I'll have to keep that in mind if I ever come out that way again. :)

You were only a few miles from this Bear's place. Oak Openings is a beautiful place. It is a large forest preserve and its' southern boundary butts-up against the Maumee State Forest. Birders, butterfly enthusiasts, hikers, cross-country skiers, and a host of others all enjoy this huge preserve. The park has a great all-purpose trail that bicyclists use and that trail connects with one of the major rails-to-trails paths that are in the Toledo Metro.

See attached.

Bear

http://www.metroparkstoledo.com/metroparks/oakopenings/
 

Bear Up North

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Carty Finkbeiner

Toledo's Mayor, Carty Finkbeiner, announced today that he will not be a candidate in the upcoming election. I should also note that he is the subject of a re-call drive. His retirement (voluntarily or not so voluntarily) will end a long public career. Accomplishments would certainly include.....

Fought (with the help of State of Ohio financial aid) to keep the huge Jeep Assembly Plant in Toledo. The new facility replaced the oldest operating automobile assembly factory in the world. He also helped established the "supplier park" that rings the plant.

Has been a very vocal supporter of Toledo. Always looking for ways to publicize the positives of a large city that provides a strong example of "dying rustbelt city".

Negatives include.....

Did not get good press when he suggested that deaf people be moved to the houses adjacent to Toledo Express Airport.....houses that were being demolished because of their closeness to the airport flyways.

Un-invited National Guardsmen who were going to use the empty weekend streets of the CBD for an urban-uprising training exercise.

Supported a city employee who was issuing parking tickets to folks who parked in their own driveway. Their crime? Their driveways were not paved.

Bear
 

WSU MUP Student

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This past weekend I was in Toledo and actually got out of the car! I was in town for a wedding and related festivities. The wedding was at St. Stephens Catholic Church in the traditionally Hungarian "Birmingham" neighborhood. The church was nice enough from the outside, nothing too spectacular but the inside had recently been completely renovated and was absolutely gorgeous. I didn't take any pictures inside, but I will try to find some.

Across the street was the original Tony Packo's so of course I had to go over and have a few dogs between the wedding and the reception... I was not disappointed at all.

The reception was around the corner at the Toledo Maritime Center which looked to me to be a brand new building and marina in the shadows of a hulking abandoned electric plant (or maybe it was a steel mill?) and the brand new I-280 bridge over the Maumee River.

For my first trip to Toledo instead of just through Toledo, I was impressed with the bit that I got to see... now I may have to come back this summer for a Mud Hens game and another trip to Tony Packo's!
 

DetroitPlanner

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For my first trip to Toledo instead of just through Toledo, I was impressed with the bit that I got to see... now I may have to come back this summer for a Mud Hens game and another trip to Tony Packo's!

Next time you go to Tony's order the hungarian food instead, its much better in my opinion. I'm surprised you've not spent time there, the Glass City has a lot to offer. Besides the Mudhens, you can do the Art Museum (no City the size of Toledo has one that comes even close to it), the Zoo, or Maumee Bay State Park/Resort. Across the river from downtown is also a great dock area with waterfront restraunts and bars.
 

Bear Up North

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The Influence Of The Lake

Geography and history nuts know that Toledo was an important shipping center in the 19th Century. Maumee Bay provides protection against the considerable variables of the western basin of Lake Erie. You probably also know that the Toledo CBD does not face the lake.....it is on the Maumee River, a few miles from the lake. Let's take a written tour, to give you a bit of a picture of the influence of Lake Erie (on Toledo).

The Mouth
The Maumee River (originating in Fort Wayne, IN) is the largest river that feeds the Great Lakes. At the mouth of the river, where it slips into Maumee Bay, it is an industrial giant. There is a huge electric powerplant, some of the largest coal-loading docks (and the loading equipment) in the world, a world seaport (with a couple of the tallest cranes on the lakes), large distribution warehouses, and huge rail yards that serve all of the above. Nested between these facilities are yacht clubs and a Toledo park (with small boat launching ramps).

Because the lake freighters and the ocean-going ships will move upstream a few miles (to Toledo's large group of grain elevators) the channel is continually being dreged. The muddy (and very polluted) dregsoil is placed on a huge man-made island that is in Maumee Bay, at the mouth of the river. If you do a Google Maps view you can see the very straight lines of the man-made island.

Cullen Park (that afore-mentioned boat-launching facility) has a rocky peninsula built into the bay, providing reasonable access for shore fishermen. Because of the shallowness of this area that catch is usually catfish or carp. At the point of the peninsula there is a small channel, just wide enough for a couple small boats, separating the Cullen Park peninsula from the man-made island.

If there have been heavier rains in the midwest, the Maumee River will fill with agricultural runoff, primarily farmer soil (with agri-chemicals). I have been on my boat fishing at the mouth where the runoff and the cleaner lake water join.....creating what looks to the observer as a "mud line". This creates great fishing because the hungry fishies hang around the edge of that mud line.

The Inner Bay
Going north from the Cullen Park peninsula, the large inner bay is not navigable for the lake freighters but is oft-filled with recreational craft. Small lakeside homes line the shore from Cullen Park to what is called "The Lost Peninsula of Michigan". These homes have their front doors facing the lake and their back doors facing the streets of Toledo's unique Point Place neighborhood.

This Bear's first home (until about age 2 weeks! :-c) was on a home that was on the lake, at the corner of 145th and Lakeside. The inner bay is shallow with a generally hard sandy bottom. Some areas have a mucky bottom. In the cold Winter months the inner bay will have dozens of ice sailboats sliding around.

The Islands
There are a number of islands that help to create Maumee Bay. These islands are in Michigan but straddle the state line. Experienced boaters know the channels between the islands and enjoy the protection they provide when the winds make venturing on the "big lake" a questionable move. Many of the islands have sand beaches and a hard sandy bottom just offshore, creating great places for boaters to camp and just hang-out.

On the lake-side of the islands is the big open water of the western basin of Lake Erie. On this side, on a calm day, hundreds of boaters will raft off of each other, stand in 3-feet deep clean water (about 100 yards from the island), drink alcohol, and party down. From here you can see tiny Turtle Island, a few miles out in the lake.

If you motor east from here, just a few miles, you will find what is considered the best fishing in the Great Lakes.....especially for walleye and yellow perch.

Note: Zebra mussells were introduced into the Great Lakes a number of years ago, by hitching a ride in the ballast tanks of ocean freighters. These little guys have helped make the lake look and feel pretty clean......but on many beach areas they hurt your feet (so wear sandals, or flops).

The Feeds
The Maumee River feeds Maumee Bay, and eventually that water gets into the big western basin of Lake Erie. Others feeds include the Ottawa River and Halfway Creek. These small streams are home to numerous yacht clubs, boat marinas, and water-recreation-oriented businesses. Toledo-area boaters will stay within the confines of the rivers and the bay, if the winds are strong and the big lake is rough. On calmer days, the big lake gets most of the boats.

Sloshing & Flooding
Take a shallow pan and fill it with water. Tip it slighty down to the right......this shows what happens to western Lake Erie (and Maumee Bay) when the winds are strong from the west. The water level drops so low that some of the shallower boat marinas have boats literally stuck ON the mud.....the water is sometimes completely gone!

Tip that pan slightly down to the left.....this shows what happens when the winds are strong from the east and (especially) the northeast. The water levels goes way up.....almost dangerously up.

Flooding in Point Place was a common occurence. New Orleans-style photos are the best way to describe it. Strong (and consistent) east or northeast winds would flood entire neighborhoods......and most of the Point Place homes are on or near the water. My Grandmother lived on the lake, on 145th Street. During a major flood in the early 1970s her basement was filled with water and the first floor had some water. The National Guard was called in to assist because conditions were so bad.

At that time, there was a small concrete breakwall that helped to protect against high water. But that breakwall (only about 3 feet high) was good enough to sit on but not good enough to protect from a high-water situation. After the major flooding in the 1970s a series of much-taller breakwalls was built, along with flood control gates. If my family would still be owners of my Grandmother's house we would not be able to see the lake from the living room. We would have to go upstairs to see Maumee Bay. It is a tall breakwall.

Weather
Like many Great Lakes' areas, Metro Toledo is significantly affected by our lake, Lake Erie. Lake-effect snowfall is a rarity, because of the location at the "wrong" or "right" (depends on how much you like snow) end of the lake. Temperature is another story, though. The warm lake waters in Autumn will keep areas near the lake much warmer on cold nights. The opposite will happen in Spring, when my area near Swanton (far from the lake) will be 50F and by the lake (that still has some ice) it will be 35F.
_____

Do a Google Maps and check out Maumee Bay. :)

Bear
 

Bear Up North

Cyburbian Emeritus
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44 Million $$ Budget Woes

Toledo, like many government units, is running on empty. The city has a projected deficit of $44 million. The new mayor, Mike Bell, has published (in the local rag, with campaign dollars, not public dollars) a long list of comments and suggestions for budget reductions. I belive that the list is honest, straightforward, and damn challenging. Mister Bell, with whom I have sat with at some other events, has a daunting task. Here are some samples from the long list.....

Examine a historical schedule showing the numbers of employees and City population.
Examine early or lump-sum retirement incentives.
Benchmark employee numbers vs. other cities.
Eliminate all or most of the vacant positions.
Work to renegotiate contract expenses.
Modify employee vehicle policy.
Control Worker's Comp costs.
Sell real estate and other assets.
Sell ads on garbage cans.
Increase the employee share of medical costs to 20%.
Reduce the number of paid holidays.

Bear
 

TerraSapient

Cyburbian
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Hey Bear-
I am from Toledo as well. Just finished my MA at UT in 2009 and moved back to Hawaii. I appreciate this thread a lot. Thanks for posting an insider's perspective about the how the city is doing. I'm especially interested to hear about the new mayor - Mike Bell and his goals, accomplishments, and/or shortcomings.

Thanks
 
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