• It's easy to sign up and post! Register with a working email address (we won't give it to others, or spam you), or through Facebook, Twitter, or a Microsoft ID. Google and LinkedIn coming soon. 🙂

Oak Park, IL in Spring, 2006 (Lots of pics)

mendelman

Unfrozen Caveman Planner
Moderator
Messages
11,238
Likes
7
Points
27
#1
Here are some photos from spring 2006.

A new 3-flat being built among several old 2-flats.




You can't go wrong with the vernacular Chicago building stock.






























The continential divide.....ahhhhh.






Metra commuter rail station in downtown Oak Park.
























Back where we started.
 
Last edited:

jsk1983

Cyburbian
Messages
2,434
Likes
0
Points
0
#3
Great pictures. Suburbia doesn't get much better than this. Of course this is more urban than many American cities. I was in Oak Park a couple weeks ago, but was too tired to do much exploring. Is there than one downtown/business district or did I just miss part (I was in the area around the Oak Park stop on the Green Line.
 

nrschmid

Cyburbian
Messages
2,854
Likes
0
Points
0
#4
Great pics. Still despise the new library: wish they kept that big old metal building from my childhood.
 

mendelman

Unfrozen Caveman Planner
Moderator
Messages
11,238
Likes
7
Points
27
#5
DP said:
Out of curiosity, why no FLlW buildings?
Because I wasn't in the area with the main concentration of such buildings and also there are probably a gazillion such photos on the internets as it is. Why take more?
jsk1983 said:
Is there than one downtown/business district or did I just miss part
Well, the Green Line runs through the two part of downtown, but there are at least six more commercial districts in the village - Roosevelt Rd, Madison Ave, Harrison St., Chicago Ave, Lake St., and North Ave.
nrschmid said:
Still despise the new library: wish they kept that big old metal building from my childhood.
Don't be a hater. ;) The interior is gorgeous and they have a great collection. Plus, being right next to Scoville Park is a great location.
 

nrschmid

Cyburbian
Messages
2,854
Likes
0
Points
0
#6
I agree the building is better, just have a lot of fond memories of the big old metal building (sort of like a kid's attachment to a toy or a blanket), went to preschool-kindergarten at first baptist on the north side of scoville.
 
Messages
31
Likes
0
Points
0
#7
I absolutely LOVE Oak Park! I went to high school at Fenwick and hung out in Oak Park all the time. By far one of my favorite suburbs anywhere! the pictures really show its urban qualities not found in more traditional suburbs.
 
Messages
31
Likes
0
Points
0
#9
No. but when you think of suburbs, you don't think of two rapid transit lines, a commuter rail line, a highway, multiple dense business districts, overall high population density (relatively), urban housing stock (2 and 3 flats, multiple-unit apartments), diverse population. Is Oak Park more urban than Park Forest? ...yes, I would say so.
 

njm

Cyburbian
Messages
322
Likes
0
Points
0
#10
Well, according to Hemingway, it may be more similar than you think

Oak Park was a mainly Protestant, upper middle-class suburb of Chicago that Hemingway would later refer to as a town of "wide lawns and narrow minds." Only ten miles from the big city, Oak Park was really much farther away philosophically. It was basically a conservative town that tried to isolate itself from Chicago's liberal seediness. Hemingway was raised with the conservative Midwestern values of strong religion, hard work, physical fitness and self determination; if one adhered to these parameters, he was taught, he would be ensured of success in whatever field he chose.
-from The Hemingway Resource Center
 

mendelman

Unfrozen Caveman Planner
Moderator
Messages
11,238
Likes
7
Points
27
#12
Well, according to Hemingway, it may be more similar than you think


-from The Hemingway Resource Center
Yes, perhaps....in 1920. :r:

It is much more diverse place now (and since the 1970s) and the bastion of "liberal" that 52% of the country demonizes. ;)
Northsider said:
No. but when you think of suburbs, you don't think of two rapid transit lines, a commuter rail line, a highway, multiple dense business districts, overall high population density (relatively), urban housing stock (2 and 3 flats, multiple-unit apartments), diverse population. Is Oak Park more urban than Park Forest? ...yes, I would say so.
Yes, it is much more urban than a typical present day suburb, but I was mainly ribbing you about using the word traditional in reference to suburbs that are decades younger than Oak Park.
 
Messages
31
Likes
0
Points
0
#13
Yes, it is much more urban than a typical present day suburb, but I was mainly ribbing you about using the word traditional in reference to suburbs that are decades younger than Oak Park.
I understand what you mean. By "traditional" I simply meant "typical" suburbs most commonly found today: low density, commercial strip development, no/low transit access, etc
 

Streck

Cyburbian
Messages
601
Likes
0
Points
0
#14
No Frank Lloyd Wright houses in the Oak Park thread? He really showed an interest in setbacks, landscaping, and urban livability in his housing.
 
Top