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Oh lets just sue to get money!

PlannerGirl

Cyburbian Plus
Messages
6,377
Points
29
http://www.cnn.com/2004/LAW/04/18/coors.suit.ap/index.html

Now is it just me or is this woman just shooting off a shotgun lawsuit hopeful to get something out of someone? Come no suing your dead sons gf and her mother becouse YOUR kid got drunk and drove (without a permit to do so) someones car into a tree killing themselves? OK I can see suing Coors though it doesn to speak well of your parenting but lay off the kid and her mother.

grrrrr
 

Gedunker

Moderating
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
11,487
Points
41
And he just happened to be driving 90mph when the tree jumped out and hit him.

Ahhhh, our litigious society |-)
 

SlaveToTheGrind

Cyburbian
Messages
1,445
Points
27
She is trying to blame the death of her son on anyone but who blame should fall - her son. The girlfriend may be partly respnsible since she did give him her keys. The judge will probably throw out the suit agains Coors and bring some verdict against the girlfriend.
 

Floridays

Cyburbian
Messages
769
Points
21
If ANY lawsuit is really feasible, it should be directed towards the parents who own the house in which the party took place. When I bartended in college, we had to be really careful in serving people who already were/became inebriated, because if anything happened after they left the bar, we could be held responsible for it.
Just like the woman I refused to serve because she was pregnant. Sorry, wasn't about to contribute to fetal alcohol syndrome!
 

Super Amputee Cat

Cyburbian
Messages
2,250
Points
30
Speaking of lawyers...

I can't figure out which is worse, ambulance chasing Trial Lawyers or Enron-type Corporate Lawyers. Certainly corporate lawyers are more dangerous by their sheer power and political influence, but trial lawyers are just like cockroaches...they are everywhere and multiplying fast.
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
Messages
10,080
Points
34
It sounds like SttG got it right. This woman is contending with her son's death by trying to make somebody else liable for it - a scapegoat to take out her anger on. I am sorry her son died, but she needs to accept that it was of his own actions.
 
Messages
3,690
Points
27
argh. stories like this make me insanely angry at the demise of personal responsibility in this country.

And this may be slightly OT, but is anyone else disturbed by this trend of extending childhood into young adulthood (18-24)? People moving back home and staying there indefinitely after college, etc, etc. I would support reducing the drinking age back to 18, if all indications of youth culture (ok - my only indication is MTV) didn't confirm my belief that most under 21year olds are idiots. Except Planning and Geography majors. Of course. :D
 

B'lieve

Cyburbian
Messages
219
Points
9
Floridays said:
If ANY lawsuit is really feasible, it should be directed towards the parents who own the house in which the party took place. When I bartended in college, we had to be really careful in serving people who already were/became inebriated, because if anything happened after they left the bar, we could be held responsible for it.
Just like the woman I refused to serve because she was pregnant. Sorry, wasn't about to contribute to fetal alcohol syndrome!
That was very wise. I used to work with a kid who had fetal alcohol syndrome. Essentially a four year old mind in an eight year old body.

The sad part is I'm seeing the same "nothing's ever my fault" mentality in some of my students. Thankfully only a few show it consistently, and they are still teenagers/preteens with a chance of growing out of it, but it's still sad and occasionally infuriating.
 

Wulf9

Member
Messages
923
Points
22
B'lieve said:
The sad part is I'm seeing the same "nothing's ever my fault" mentality in some of my students. Thankfully only a few show it consistently, and they are still teenagers/preteens with a chance of growing out of it, but it's still sad and occasionally infuriating.
Perhaps the "nothing's my fault" syndrome comes from looking at the behaviour of our national leaders and business leaders. You can't blame the kids when our national leaders are leading by the wrong example.
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
Messages
10,080
Points
34
Wulf9 said:
Perhaps the "nothing's my fault" syndrome comes from looking at the behaviour of our national leaders and business leaders. You can't blame the kids when our national leaders are leading by the wrong example.
No, I don't buy that. There are always good and bad role models. The kids (and adults) just need to choose the right ones.
 

Rumpy Tunanator

Cyburbian
Messages
4,473
Points
25
Downtown said:
And this may be slightly OT, but is anyone else disturbed by this trend of extending childhood into young adulthood (18-24)? People moving back home and staying there indefinitely after college, etc, etc.
Yes it disturbs me. Losers. As soon as they cut the line at 18, goodbye, don't come back.

I think the mommy should be suing her son for being an idiot. It all comes down to this. You are solely responsible for your own actions. You made the choice, you deal with, even if it gets you killed.
 

BKM

Cyburbian
Messages
6,463
Points
29
Downtown said:
argh. stories like this make me insanely angry at the demise of personal responsibility in this country.

And this may be slightly OT, but is anyone else disturbed by this trend of extending childhood into young adulthood (18-24)? People moving back home and staying there indefinitely after college, etc, etc. I would support reducing the drinking age back to 18, if all indications of youth culture (ok - my only indication is MTV) didn't confirm my belief that most under 21year olds are idiots. Except Planning and Geography majors. Of course. :D
But, that's quite typical of many cultures-the whole extended family thing. I read somewhere that Italians, if they don't get married after school, often live with their parents (and spend their money on Dolce &Gabanna and Prada :))

Plus, it partly reflects the major runup in housing costs in many metropolitan areas. How can we expect a kid raised in a 3000 square foot suburban villa to be psychologically capable of a shared rental with room mates at close quarters?

Not that I disagree with you, but when a small apartment is $1500 a month in many metros...
 

Habanero

Cyburbian
Messages
3,241
Points
27
I knew I had a place to live, but my parents made it painfully obvious if I was to live at home I was going to have the same rules as I always had butI had to pay rent, pull my weight with chores, etc... it wasn't like I got to live at home on easy street. I decided if I was going to pay for it I wanted my own place. I broke up with a guy because he thought it was a great idea to move back home when he was 25. :-# That's awful, grow the hell up, pay your bills, and don't be such a mooch.
 

Repo Man

Cyburbian
Messages
2,549
Points
25
….and the trial lawyers think we don’t need tort reform.

How does this lady know that he wasn’t doing shots at the party? How can you blame Coors. If they were serving Blatz at the party this guy would have drank it too. The girlfriend is an idiot for letting him drive her car while wasted, without a license, but it was the guy who ultimately made the stupid decision to drive at 90 mph.

Its like anytime something bad happens to people, they want to sue and make someone feel the pain for their loss. Sometimes you just have to accept the fact that your loved one made a stupid decision and that is why they died.
 
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