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Ok, What do you call your soft drinks

What do you call your soft drinks?

  • Pop

    Votes: 15 42.9%
  • Soda

    Votes: 15 42.9%
  • Coke

    Votes: 5 14.3%

  • Total voters
    35
  • Poll closed .

giff57

Corn Burning Fool
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5,398
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32
Since the pop vs soda topic came up, here is a poll>
 

NHPlanner

Forums Administrator & Gallery Moderator
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38
Soda....but there are still a few holdouts (my dad included) that say tonic. :)
 

Chet

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
10,624
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34
Soda

And we drink from the bubbler - not the water fountain.
 

PlannerGirl

Cyburbian Plus
Messages
6,377
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29
I call it soda but my souther born family calls everything coke. Course they also use enough sugar in tea to make your spoon stand up!
 

pete-rock

Cyburbian
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1,551
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24
I see, bturk. And I guess you call it a stop-and-go light rather than a stoplight, too. You're such a cheesehead!
 

Chet

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pete-rock said:
I see, bturk. And I guess you call it a stop-and-go light rather than a stoplight, too. You're such a cheesehead!
Yah Hey.
 

kms

Cyburbian
Messages
5,847
Points
30
I call them coke; a holdover from my Kentucky family. My PA kids call them pop.
 

El Feo

Cyburbian
Messages
674
Points
19
"Coke" was pretty generic where I grew up. Like "kleenex." If anyone called it soda or pop, I automatically knew they were ferriners. If they talked longer and eventually called water fountains "bubblers," I could nail down their origin fairly quickly...
 

Dan

Dear Leader
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17,691
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Pop. Pronounced with a Buffalo accent, like "paa-hap."
 

nerudite

Cyburbian
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6,544
Points
30
Hmmmm....

Growing up I called it soda or Coke. Up here in Canada, I say pop so I don't sound so odd to the locals (although I probably do anyway).

Does anyone else call the grocery store the "market", or is that just an L.A. thing? Anywhere outside of So. Cal, and people just look at me funny...
 

GeogPlanner

Cyburbian
Messages
1,433
Points
25
Dan said:
Pop. Pronounced with a Buffalo accent, like "paa-hap."
our af2 rochester rivals like to come to albany for games and wave a sign that says "it's called pop." next year i bring them a soda sign.
 

Runner

Cyburbian
Messages
566
Points
17
Used to be "soda" when I was growing up just outside Boston. However, now that I live in Texas it has to be "coke". Down here if you asked for a soda they likely would wonder why you want a soda water.

Does anyone else call the grocery store the "market", or is that just an L.A. thing?
I have called it a "market" since I was growing up. Sometimes now we say "super market" or even just say the "H-E-B"



 

JNL

Cyburbian
Messages
2,449
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25
We call them soft drinks or by their individual names e.g. Coke, Sprite, Fanta...
 
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5,353
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31
We call soft drinks either by their brand name or "cold drinks." I never heard the term "pop" (referring to soft drinks) until my Yankee Bostonian cousins spent the summer down here.
 

Journeymouse

Cyburbian
Messages
443
Points
13
The 'polite' term has been soft drinks for as long as I can remember, although nobody but menu writers ever bothers to use it - I guess it takes too long to say. Generally, we (the people I know, anyway) refer to lemonade, orangeade, coke or pepsi (for all colas, depends on personal favourite) or what ever type/flavour we're talking about. IIRC, this was the habit in the South of England before it got to the North. In the North, particularly where I grew up, it used to be the habit to call it all pop when talking generally. Some adults/people over 30 still do. We only tend to get specific when we're actually buying it (e.g. Sprite, 7up, Fanta). Although some of the drinks are blended mixes so generic names don't apply, e.g. Lilt, and to make it more confusing many brand names have expanded to do several flavours under the same name (As you presumably know).

Here endeth the lesson (on eccentric English/British people)
 
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3,690
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27
It's:
Soda
IN line (not on line - as in "Standing in line")
a sub (not hero)
a pizza (not a pie)
 

JNL

Cyburbian
Messages
2,449
Points
25
I've never, ever heard it called pop in this country. People would think you were asking for someone's grandfather if you asked for pop!

Planasaurus, you are so modest (not!). I think you should keep your "cloths" on!
 

planasaurus

Cyburbian
Messages
215
Points
9
JNL said:


Planasaurus, you are so modest (not!). I think you should keep your "cloths" on!
Oh, that is from a song that plays on the radio non-stop over here (oops, I didn't see that I spelled it wrong!). Probably didn't make it over to NZ yet - or maybe people over there have better taste.
 

donk

Cyburbian
Messages
6,970
Points
30
somewhat related

Since I help to start this one on pop vs soda a related question about beer and the amounts it is sold in.

Is it a 2-4 (especially on Victoria Day)
A flat (24 beer)
A case (24 beer)
A case (12 beer)

Other ?
 

giff57

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Re: somewhat related

donk said:
Since I help to start this one on pop vs soda a related question about beer and the amounts it is sold in.

Is it a 2-4 (especially on Victoria Day)
A flat (24 beer)
A case (24 beer)
A case (12 beer)

Other ?

6 pack
12 pack
case
quart
40
tall boy
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
Messages
10,080
Points
34
I dream of a day when it won't be sold in these forms, but piped directly from the municipal brewery directly into our homes.

"Oh, you work for the city. What is it you do?"

"Brewmaster."

It could happen.
 

donk

Cyburbian
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6,970
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30
I dream of a day when it won't be sold in these forms, but piped directly from the municipal brewery directly into our homes.
so we would have the following taps in the kitchen

hot water
cold water
ale
pilsner
 

Tom R

Cyburbian
Messages
2,274
Points
25
beer

We used to measure out fishing trips by the expected amount of beer to be consumes.
i.e.
"How long will it take to get to Kelly's Station?"
"That's an easy 12 pack."
 

Zoning Goddess

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13,853
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On the "market" question. I grew up in Central Florida before the real Yankee invasion. We just went "to the Winn Dixie" - a generic term for any grocery store.
 

Tom R

Cyburbian
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2,274
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25
taps

donk said:


so we would have the following taps in the kitchen

hot water
cold water
ale
pilsner
At my brother's camp, they put an old refrigerator in an ajoining shed, drilled a hole in the wall and ran flexible tubing from the keg and the tap inside. Very convenient.
 

Jen

Cyburbian
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1,704
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25
It was always soda pop or just soda when I was growing up. But up here in Michigan everyone calls it pop.

And another term that seems to vary according to geography is that sweet hard candy on a stick. I've always called it a lollipop but around here everyone calls 'em suckers.
 
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3,690
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27
Is "suckers" a Great Lakes thing like euchre and pop? I never thought about it, but that's what we grew up calling them.
 

El Feo

Cyburbian
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674
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19
They were "suckers" in Kentucky, but that may just be one of those confused border state abberations (northern most southern state, or southern most northern state?)
 

Jen

Cyburbian
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1,704
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25
Another one, that strip of grass, between the sidewalk and road was called a "devils strip" by my parents. Weird! Anyone heard of that one before?

And I never encountered a "party store" until I moved up north.
7-11's filled that niche in my hometown.
 

Chet

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Suckers in Wisconsin too.

Maybe I should rephrase that...
 

Tom R

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strips

Jen said:
Another one, that strip of grass, between the sidewalk and road was called a "devils strip" by my parents. Weird! Anyone heard of that one before?

And I never encountered a "party store" until I moved up north.
7-11's filled that niche in my hometown.
They're called "Devil strips" in Ohio too. Haven't the foggiest why.
 

Tom R

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pops

I grew up with lollipops, but there were a few "suckers" around too.

Is your mother's sister your aunt (awnt) or aunt (ant)?
 

giff57

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Jen said:
Another one, that strip of grass, between the sidewalk and road was called a "devils strip" by my parents. Weird! Anyone heard of that one before?
We call that "the parking" here
 

statler

Cyburbian
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447
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14
Since we wandered from pop vs soda debate (it's soda by the way, anybody who says otherwise is wrong.), does anybody outside of New England call chocolate sprinkles on thier ice cream 'jimmies'?
 

El Feo

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674
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statler said:
Since we wandered from pop vs soda debate (it's soda by the way, anybody who says otherwise is wrong.), does anybody outside of New England call chocolate sprinkles on thier ice cream 'jimmies'?
Statler, that really screwed with me when I moved up here! Where I come from "jimmies" are something entirely different, and you don't want them on your ice cream.

As for the whole "awnt v. ant" debate, my wife and I have come to a compromise - by virtue of the fact that she's a New Englander, hers are "awnts," and mine in KY are "ants."
 
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El Feo said:


Statler, that really screwed with me when I moved up here! Where I come from "jimmies" are something entirely different, and you don't want them on your ice cream.

As for the whole "awnt v. ant" debate, my wife and I have come to a compromise - by virtue of the fact that she's a New Englander, hers are "awnts," and mine in KY are "ants."
"Jimmies" come in a variety of textures, sizes and flavors. ;)
 

Chet

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statler said:
Since we wandered from pop vs soda debate (it's soda by the way, anybody who says otherwise is wrong.), does anybody outside of New England call chocolate sprinkles on thier ice cream 'jimmies'?
Jimmies are also on frosted donuts around here.
 
Messages
54
Points
4
Sprinkles it is, but the crazy people at my local Dairy Queen seem to think they should be Jimmies. And I thought Buffalo was the eastern edge of Pop's domain, I guess I was wrong.

W-Pop Wooo! It's Dynamite. Anyone from New York remember those ads? Or what they were about?
 
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27
Yodan731 said:
Sprinkles it is, but the crazy people at my local Dairy Queen seem to think they should be Jimmies. And I thought Buffalo was the eastern edge of Pop's domain, I guess I was wrong.

W-Pop Wooo! It's Dynamite. Anyone from New York remember those ads? Or what they were about?
Hmmm.... don't remember W-pop. But my favorite Western NY beverage (aside from Visniaks Cherry Soda) is Wegman's "Mountain Woo", their mountain dew rip off. hee!
 

Terraplan

Cyburbian
Messages
23
Points
2
Here we either call it juice, but that makes no sense to me for things like coke - juice to me is fruit juice, or we call it simply cooldrink.

And instead of sprinkles we have toppings.
 

Dan

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Are strange local brands of pop common elsewhere in the country?

Last time I was in Buffalo, there were still some local pop brands ... Consumer's Beverage, Black Rock, and Visniak. Can't forget Aunt Rosie's Loganberry.



Hey, PlannerGirl, wanna' get some of dat dere winter padding on dere?

 
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Ok, I really enjoyed that in the listing of all the "native buffalo" foods that are going to be offered, "Pepsi Products" was included. OK, you can't get Weber's or Sahlen in DC, but no Pepsi, either?
 
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