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Old school drafting/mapping tools

JNA

Cyburbian Plus
Messages
24,417
Points
47
Are you old enough to remember drafting maps & charts using
 

Maister

Chairman of the bored
Messages
26,393
Points
52
Moderator note:

split from RTDNTOTO


I came into the field during a time of transition. In school, they were just starting to introduce computers, but still required classes in map making using mylar sheets, exacto-knives, and Rapidograph pens. Actually, I think being versed in old school drafting/mapping with its' emphasis on design elements and manual skills has made me a better map-maker.

Edit: I also recall using a dot planimeter to calculate areas during an internship
 

DVD

Cyburbian
Messages
13,313
Points
34
Not an old school mapper, but I learned drafting with the old T-squares and triangles and stuff.
 

Whose Yur Planner

Cyburbian
Messages
10,303
Points
31
I went to a school that emphasized policy (SPEA), not mapping/geography. Bottom line, I never had to do any mapping. At my first job, we had a draftsman. I remember his office in the back. We also had the mylar copy machines.
 

WSU MUP Student

Cyburbian
Messages
9,409
Points
29
I went to a school that emphasized policy (SPEA), not mapping/geography.
Me too. We had GIS available for an elective (it wasn't required for any of the concentrations) and the guy that taught it was much more of a data guy than a mapping guy. IIRC, @Maister and I went to the same grad school, but a couple of decades apart. I wonder how much the curriculum changed over that time...

At my office, we still have a lot of folks who like to remind us they learned how to make maps using mylar and exacto-knives and light tables and blah blah blah...

When planners retire we usually give them one of the old platometers/planimeters that are entirely analog, weigh a few pounds and nobody uses anymore. The supervisor on the planning side builds a nice little velvet-lined box for it and puts a plaque on it. Everytime we give one out, some of us like to yell out, "What is that!?!" and respond with things like "A mimeograph??" "An abacus?"
 

JNA

Cyburbian Plus
Messages
24,417
Points
47
I agree with Maister on
Actually, I think being versed in old school drafting/mapping with its' emphasis on design elements and manual skills has made me a better map-maker.
 

Whose Yur Planner

Cyburbian
Messages
10,303
Points
31
We have an an old drafting table in the office area. We use it as a work space. I latched onto it as a reminder of Planning's roots.
 

Planit

Cyburbian
Messages
11,442
Points
33
I learned on all the "old school" drafting tools. I co-oped during 2 of my summers in college (82 & 83) with a cartographic firm and we still used amberlith, zip-tape & zip-a-tone along with some advanced tools, but no computers.

I have a planimeter at home in a nice box, 2 Leroy letting kits, 2 sets of rapidiogrpahs, triangle, flex curves, et cetera ... in a nice storage box under the bed.
 

Gedunker

Moderating
Moderator
Messages
10,957
Points
31
I'm taking the office set of Dietzgen drafting tools with me when I retire here (or they boot me out - either way). I'm the only one left that ever used them and that even knows how to use them.;)
 

Fat Cat

Cyburbian
Messages
1,651
Points
19
I still have all of my old drafting tools. The City that I started out with required us to buy our own drafting equipment, tools etc. A salesman came through on a fairly regular basis to sell us equipment, including ink and lead for our pencils ( yes we had to buy our own pens, ink, pencils, lead for the pencils, erasers etc.) but they were generous in providing drafting tables, stools, mylar, paper, and lighting. :rolleyes: Naturally when I left I took them with me.
 

michaelskis

Cyburbian
Messages
19,114
Points
42
On my first day of my first job, they handed me a an electric eraser and stack of Mylar maps that had building footprints and property lines and told me to update the maps. Thinking they were joking I said "Sure... where is the computer with ArcView?"

I still have my grandfathers drafting board and t-square that he bought in the 50's.
 

WSU MUP Student

Cyburbian
Messages
9,409
Points
29
I have a wood box set of K&E french curves.
My neighbor is in his 90s and was an architect for decades. I was helping him move some stuff in his basement and he had a couple stacks of old boxes with "Keuffel and Esser" labels probably from the 1950s and 1960s. They were all different sizes so I imagine they are all different things - notebooks, slide rules, drafting kits, french curves, etc. Now I'm interested to know what's in there. Next time I'm over there I'll have to ask him about all his old stuff.
 

mendelman

Unfrozen Caveman Planner
Moderator
Messages
12,279
Points
37
So, old tools...like ArcGis 2.0?

I started my planning education in 2000 and professional career in 2002.

You old guys.....:giggle:
 

The Terminator

Cyburbian
Messages
1,594
Points
21
Began my education in 2009, and my "Career" in 2013 with my first field placement in Montreal that was very mapping heavy. I used ArcMap 10.2.

Never took or had to take any hand cartography courses, GIS, Sketchup, CAD and Illustrator were stressed instead. But it's something I would like to do for fun one day.
 

Doohickie

Cyburbian
Messages
1,464
Points
23
I drafted an entire concept design of a satellite on pencil and paper back in the 80s. Was not allowed to use CAD for that one.
 

estromberg

Cyburbian
Messages
167
Points
7
My boss is a PLS and collects old surveying instruments. The accuracy that old school surveyors were able to achieve with these tools is saimply stunning.
 

Doohickie

Cyburbian
Messages
1,464
Points
23
My architect friend who grew up in the area said that in Fort Worth, when you see streets offset like that, the root cause usually goes back to differences in the original ranch surveys in the area.

It's not uncommon for cities in the area to have border disputes (typically solved without resorting to arms ;) ) because of differences in surveys from back when.
 

Gedunker

Moderating
Moderator
Messages
10,957
Points
31
Oh, well, since an Architect told you, it must be true.:blueshirt:

Teasing. That appears to be a 20' or 25' off-set, and while it's possible old ranch surveys had those kinds of margins for error, I'd guess by the time people got around to platting real estate for sale, they had substantially closed that gap. I'm guessing it more likely that someone realized shorter lots = shorter blocks and shorter blocks = more lots and more lots = more $$$. 'Cause that's the American way.:usa:
 

Dan

Dear Leader
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
17,302
Points
52
During my New Mexico years, I used to see surveys with the Spanish vara as a unit of measurement. Yiumwou7ld think it's easy to convery varas to feet or meters or whatever, but it isn't. Every western state, along with Mexico, has a different vara length. If the surveyor was from Texas, you had to know whether they used Texas varas or New Mexico varas. If it was from the time when the city was part of Mexico, you used the Mexican vara. Before 1854, part of the city was in the US, while part was in Mexico, which also made a difference in vara length.
 

luckless pedestrian

Super Moderator
Moderator
Messages
11,042
Points
34
I started out my career drafting base maps, details and the like - I drafted 3 stops on the orange line in Boston in 1986!

I loved drafting and as I got better, I got to draw and color too on renderings.

I never learned GIS
 
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