Old school drafting/mapping tools

Messages
1,169
Likes
12
Points
21
#21
My architect friend who grew up in the area said that in Fort Worth, when you see streets offset like that, the root cause usually goes back to differences in the original ranch surveys in the area.

It's not uncommon for cities in the area to have border disputes (typically solved without resorting to arms ;) ) because of differences in surveys from back when.
 

Gedunker

Moderating
Moderator
Messages
10,852
Likes
10
Points
31
#22
Oh, well, since an Architect told you, it must be true.:blueshirt:

Teasing. That appears to be a 20' or 25' off-set, and while it's possible old ranch surveys had those kinds of margins for error, I'd guess by the time people got around to platting real estate for sale, they had substantially closed that gap. I'm guessing it more likely that someone realized shorter lots = shorter blocks and shorter blocks = more lots and more lots = more $$$. 'Cause that's the American way.:usa:
 

Dan

Dear Leader
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
16,854
Likes
69
Points
46
#23
During my New Mexico years, I used to see surveys with the Spanish vara as a unit of measurement. Yiumwou7ld think it's easy to convery varas to feet or meters or whatever, but it isn't. Every western state, along with Mexico, has a different vara length. If the surveyor was from Texas, you had to know whether they used Texas varas or New Mexico varas. If it was from the time when the city was part of Mexico, you used the Mexican vara. Before 1854, part of the city was in the US, while part was in Mexico, which also made a difference in vara length.
 

luckless pedestrian

Super Moderator
Moderator
Messages
10,733
Likes
10
Points
29
#24
I started out my career drafting base maps, details and the like - I drafted 3 stops on the orange line in Boston in 1986!

I loved drafting and as I got better, I got to draw and color too on renderings.

I never learned GIS
 
Top