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On a lighter note...help me pick a puppy

SW MI Planner

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I am trying to convince the new hubbie that we need a puppy. I know everyone is biased toward their own pooch breed, but help me out...

Here's what I am looking for:
*A midsize dog, one that can be a comfortable lap dog but I can also take out on a walk without the fear of it being eaten by large squirrels. Maybe between 20-40 pounds (??)
*An indoor dog for an average size house. We have a large fenced in back yard for lots of exercise
*One that is good with children
*One that is fairly trainable / obediant.
*Somewhat energetic - not lazy not hyper
*Don't want a super shedder - not super short hair, not long hair
*Not big on schnauzers (no offense to anyone that has one)

I think thats about it. Any suggestions?

I wanted a dalmation and call it Chief (Chad's a fulltime prof. firefighter), but thought that would be too much a cliche :) Plus, I heard they are kind of hyper and not the best around kids. I do like Brittany Spaniels, so they may be an option.




 

PlannerGirl

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Cockers are great with kids and easy to train. Your right stay away from dalmations-major problems there, hearing, back, shedding, aggression, not good with kids, destructive as all hell.

why not check out your local dog pound or rescue groups? a rescue grayhound would be great-a bit larger but likes small spaces, calm, great with kids etc.

D-the dog nut
 

BKM

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I would get a good ol' mixed breed. Its pretty heartbreaking to visit a local shelter.

I would suggest basenjis, but they are pretty strange dogs. If your husband is more of a cat person, a basenji would be pretty good, as they are very cat-like. 20-25 pounds, very little shedding or doggy odor, and a good indoor dog. Check out Basenji Rescue and Transport

However, they are not tractable at all and can be destructive if bored. They are weird dogs that are not for everybody. I have to admit, my plump Tasha is a love, though.

GOOD LUCK!
 

el Guapo

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IMHO -

Lower your expectations of finding the perfect puppy, purchase Dogs for Dummies and get a pound puppy. Your rescued dog will spend his or her whole life thanking you. And enjoy.

Don't forget to crate train and get a Halti!

Good luck! :)
 

PlannerGirl

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Im with Guap
my first dog "oreo" was a pound puppy, he has a few issues but hes GREAT a cocker i think springer mix-smart, small, shedding is not too bad etc. and just as Guap says he WORSHIPS me, i saved his little doggie life and he knows it. to think there were an easy 70 dogs there that day-by the odds he is the ONLY one that lived. it breaks my heart-all the dogs were great *lots of Dalmations, it was a few months after 101 came out and folks realized the chrismas puppy was a BAD idea*

dogs are NOT disposable-be ready to offer up 12-15 years (if your lucky) of your life to care for this love with legs.

its like having a baby in the house for the rest of its life.

My beagle (id not recomend you get a beagle) was from an old farmer-dumb ass dog

i got a rott from rottie rescue-the best damn dog i have ever had but i could not bring her with me when i moved to NoVa.

bottom line check the pound and rescue groups and dont "impluse" pick spend time with the animal. each one is diffrent than the others.

good luck and we want pictures :)

here are my boys-note the blank look on the beagle-thats NORMAL for him. totaly empty up there.
 

BKM

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Just curious, PlannerGirl

PlannerGirl: Why NOT a beagle?

(My mom needs/is thinking about getting a dog, now that she is widowed. A beagle would be a great size and temperment for her, imo)
 

mike gurnee

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I go for the pound as well. Pure breds are often so in-bred that you end up with the worst traits. I had 2 cockers that were adorable, but they could not wag their tails without leaving a puddle.
 

PlannerGirl

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the hardest dog to house break-average 2 years
they are just down right nasty-they RATHER sleep in their own waste than not-ie crates dont work well *sigh*

high strung for the first 3 years of their lives *read needs lots of room to run and lots of walks.

prone to "roaming" ie gets out and stays gone for long periods

prone to costly ear infections

prone to be barkers from hell (read VERY long and LOUD)

rather piss in house than outside

now of course your milage my vary but i was warned about beagles, from folks that had them-but i got one anyway-too damn cute. ill never have another when mine goes to rainbow bridge. i love the little shit to death but no more

their hair has little barbs on it that when they shead, and mine does a lot, the hair is pretty well attached to whatever it gets on.

Yup they are sweet
yup they are snuggly
yup they are cute as buttons

but the hassle is too much for the benifits i think-for me
 

Jeff

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We have a Rhodesian Ridgeback we got from the SPCA, he meets all your requirements you have listed. You want him?

Just kidding
 
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Christine - I would also highly recommend the pound dog route. Both of our dogs came from the shelter, one from Greenville, One from Atlanta (the Sam's Club of SPCA's). Mutts are so much more healthy and even tempered IMO. Word of caution - if you do get a mutt puppy, be aware that the "full grown weight" estimates could be really off. Our first dog - a retreiver/chow mix was estimated to top off at 50 lbs and she's 85.

As for beagles - they are smelly, dumb as rocks and bark at everything.

These links might help, the first two are breed selectors, the last searches available pets across the country:
http://www.ivillage.com/pets/tools/breedselector/questions/dog/size
http://www.urbanhound.com/houndFinder/breedFinder.html
http://www.petfinder.org/
 

Chet

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Chesapeake Bay Retreivers are awesome dogs. Friends of life, and very protective of you and your home. Good with kids too.
 

El Feo

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Once again, I seem to be the contrarian on the beagle issue. They're the only dogs we had growing up, and ours were great - even tempered, smart as whips, cleac, easy to train (both housetrain and signal and voice commands), quiet, and very affectionate. They did like to cast, but all hunting dogs do, and as long as we kept them active by walking and playing with them (with four boys in the house, not hard) that seemed to quell their urges to pick up a scent and follow it for weeks.

However, I DO concur on the pound pup suggestions. My last dog, which I think was probably a, er, "beaglador" is the smartest dog I have ever know, easy to train, great around kids, and APPRECIATIVE.
 

Dan

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I think thats about it. Any suggestions?
Some people will say "go get a pound dog." While that option is admirable, it's tough finding a dog that might meet all of your requirements. A dog must be the right fit for your lifestyle and desires; you don't want to see it go back to doggie jail, after all. That's not to say you shouldn't look in shelters, but it might take a while if you're on a breed-specific waiting list.

My pups, Bailey and Guinness, are Portuguese Water Dogs. The breed definitely meets your qualifications ... low to non-shedding, very intelligent, loves children, easy to train, energetic but not hyper. The problem ... they're very rare, and very expensive. There's about 8,000 Porties in the US, and a pup will set you back about $1,500. I got Bailey during a time when my paychecks were much higher, and I could afford a rare breed 'yuppie puppy." Guinness is a rescue; I had connections in the Portie community (!), and I was damn lucky to come across him.

Guinness and Bailey. Guinness weighs about 50 pounds; Bailey about 45.



More typical Porties; most are black or black with white markings.



If I didn't get a Portie, I'd get a Soft-Coated Wheaten Terrier. Like PWDs, they're medium-sized, intelligent, affectionate, and they don't shed much. They're active, but probably the most sedentary and least aggressive and terrier-like of the terriers. They're still rare, but much more common than Porties; a good Wheaten pup will set you back about $800 to $1200.

SCWTs are about the same size at PWDs; they range between 40 and 60 pounds.



Because PWDs are SCWTs are non-shedding, they need frequent brushing and professional grooming. A good PWD haircut costs about $60, and it's needed every other month. White PWDs are more prone to matting than black PWDs. SCWTs are less prone to matting than PWDs.

If you can put up with a little bit of shedding, my #3 dog would be the Springer Spaniel. Again, the same traits at the PWD and Wheaten ... smart, medium-sized, loves kids, active but not hyper. They're relatively common; you shouldn't have a problem finding one. The Brittany Spaniel also seems like a good choice.

I wouldn't get a trendy hippie herding dog -- Australian Shepherd, Australian Cattle Dog, etc -- they're so intelligent, so focused and so active, they'll go nuts unless you have a task for them to do several hours a day. Great competition dogs, bit so-so as pets. Ever see 'em at a dog park ... they don't care about the other dogs, instead content to catch sone Phishhead's frisbee over and over and over and over and over again. I say this because, at dog parks, the Phishheads tend to get very upset when the other, more playful dogs cross the space where they're "training" their Australian something-or-another. Sheesh ...

Count me in the anti-Beagle camp. Really ... anti-hound. Yes, Beagles are sweet, but mentally they're a couple of beers short of a six-pack. Hard to train, prone to wander, and prone to excessive vocalization. Other hounds will have similar shortcomings; sighthounds less so, but look out at an unfenced dogpark!
 

SW MI Planner

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When you get it, DON'T name it; Boshintang or Gaegogi.
That was sick - I could have lost my lunch over that. The practice, I mean. But, I probably could have done without the skeleton pics right after lunch. The website mentions that some view it the same as killing cattle for food, but for crying loud, dogs are domesticated animals, not livestock.
 

statler

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Ok, I read the headline way to quick. I thought it said:

On a lighter note...help me kick a puppy.

I think that may point to a disturbing dark side of my subconscious
 

Chet

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Re: pure love-

TexasPlanner said:
and a WHOLE lot of energy!!
I'll bet the poor boy is still seeing spots from that flash!

LOL
 

Habanero

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I think you may be right, as he ate his way to the top of the bed through the new down comforter, to find the pillows.
 

PlannerGirl

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Might be TMI

lol my beagle, Trooper, eats the rocks from the yard and the mortar from around the bricks of the house.

oh yha and hes a carpet muncher-stop laughing Mike

he picks at the seams of the carpet and EATS it-leading to a big hair ball in the tummy and 2am throw up parties *that sound is GROSS*

d
 

Chet

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Re: Might be TMI

PlannerGirl said:
he picks at the seams of the carpet and EATS it-leading to a big hair ball in the tummy and 2am throw up parties *that sound is GROSS*
d
Throw up parties? Is that another one of your fetishes? ;)
 

Mastiff

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Mastiff mix!
Mastiff mix!
Mastiff mix!

Best dog I ever had was a mastiff/pit bull mix. And had a friend with a lab/mastiff mix (too big for you). You'd love a mastiff, too, but too big for you.

Mastiff rescue is a cool group... I used to help out when I was in MO. See the link for the MCOA in your area:

http://www.mastiff.net/RESCUE.html
 
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Re: Might be TMI

PlannerGirl said:

he picks at the seams of the carpet and EATS it-leading to a big hair ball in the tummy and 2am throw up parties *that sound is GROSS*

d
I would much rather listen to a person throw up than a dog, any day! One of the worst, most gut wrenching (literally) sounds ever.
 

Habanero

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Re: Might be TMI

PlannerGirl said:
lol my beagle, Trooper, eats the rocks from the yard and the mortar from around the bricks of the house.

oh yha and hes a carpet muncher-stop laughing Mike

he picks at the seams of the carpet and EATS it-leading to a big hair ball in the tummy and 2am throw up parties *that sound is GROSS*

d
my dog is a carpet muncher too- since we have burber carpet he starts chewing it, and then pulls so it starts to run, and then just follows it around the room until he's done eating-
 

PlannerGirl

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lol so does it look like hes eating spigetti *i cant spell that word to save my life*???

and no bturk-it means Trooper wakes me up with a sound that any puppy parent would know, and then i get to chase him around as he leaves me yellow lummpy treats in the dark-before the other dog eats it

YUCK


as for the next dog id like to have-Irish Wolfhound
big gray things-sweet but aloof and quiet
 

Habanero

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it's spaghetti for sure! I totally know the dog mom sonar, I mean, I could hear my dog getting sick no matter where I was in the house. I run to him with a towel, hold him still, pull his big ears back, and make sure he throws up on the towel.

I'm worse with my cats, they get scooped up and ran to the nearest sink.

There is also the mandatory "drink water" period afterward too, I will not allow my dog to lick me after that. After the water he gets cuddled and usually hams it up like he's such a poor puppy..

Can anyone tell I HATE stains?
 
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Re: Dog mom sonar

Just the beginning part, the kind of burping hiccup - totally sends me sprinting through the house to make sure I can get her to the bathroom or kitchen (linoleum and tile flooring - so much easier to clean) in time. Rob's parents have it the worst though. Their one dog, Hooch, is a rabid poop eater (literally hovers over their other dog while she does her business). Wins the award for worst dog vomit ever.
 

PlannerGirl

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Ok yall did it-i snarfled all over my keyboard! sigh

one of my friends dog eats the cats...stuff from the litter box

talk about NASTY dog breath.

dogs do some STRANGE things
 

Habanero

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Ah yes.. kitty cookies. Hatcher loves them! We've had to place the litter box under the stairs to where he can't get to it butthe cats can.
 
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My parents live way out in the middle of nowhere, and they throw their kitty litter over the side of a hill. When the dogs come to visit grandma and grandpa, as soon as their let out of the car, they run right over the bank. blargh.

Christine - are you sure you want a dog? they really are so gross.
 

Habanero

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Oh yeah, at the ranch if you let any "city" dogs out there the first thing they do if find the largest pile of dung and roll around. It's gross!
 

Chet

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KMateja said:
Christine - are you sure you want a dog? they really are so gross.
Yeah, all that licking themselves all the time too! Jeez. If I could do that, I'd never leave the house!
 

Jeff

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PlannerGirl said:


one of my friends dog eats the cats...stuff from the litter box
Or better known as "Litter Robbin' " in my house. The dog knows that he is doomed to sleep in the crate and not in bed when he does that, but he doesn't care. He can't get enough of those yummy treats.
 

SW MI Planner

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Ok, I read the headline way to quick. I thought it said:
On a lighter note...help me kick a puppy.
Is that related to the kitten killing (or whatever the heck it is) thing?! I don' t think I was around when that started and have really no clue what it means - not really sure if I *want* to know :)

Christine - are you sure you want a dog? they really are so gross.
Ummm.. I was this morning, now I'm not so sure!!! I definately won't show this thread to Chad...he'd use it proof why we shouldn't get a dog. However.....I think I have a way of having him relent. I started talking this morning about having a baby, and he said "We've only been married two weeks...let's get a puppy instead!!"
 

Mastiff

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bturk said:


Yeah, all that licking themselves all the time too! Jeez. If I could do that, I'd never leave the house!
Buy a dog! I'm sure he won't mind you doing that to him at all!
 

PlannerGirl

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lol someone wanna fill her in on what killing the kitty is off list-afterall she is newly married and hopefuly wont be needing such for a while ;-)


i did the same thing to my ex husband when we got married-
after sex, laying there all cuddled up he was a softy and id sweetly croon and i snuggled in closer

"honey, puppy...honey...pppuuuppyyyyy"

it was that or a baby-i got my first dog within a month of marriage, the next was 6 months later, the last one was a year and a half later (i learned not to have too many baby puppies in the house at the same time.

get him while he still has that screwy grin on his face and hes half asleep-if you play your cards right you wil get whatever you want (with in reason)

d
 
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I definitely definitely definitely recommend having a dog (especially a puppy) before having kids. all the cleaning up poop and vomit, and destructiveness, but when they look at you with those big eyes and give you a snuggle ... sigh. i wouldn't trade my two monkey dogs for anything.
 

Habanero

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I'd have to second getting a dog before making a baby. I've realized how much more time I'm going to need with a child. A dog is a big commitment, and I'm learning how to pick up after something else, other than James, and learning patience.

It's not like I can right hook a child, but I swear if Hatcher ever pees on me again he's going to get it.. he did it for the third time two days ago while I was making dinner. Ugh.
 

Cardinal

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Let me make a pitch for rescue organizations. You can get a dog after its "puppy years" that is already trained, and because of the care they get before being placed, you can know something of their disposition before adopting it.
 

BKM

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Recuse is a great source!

Michael Stumpf is right on.

I adopted Tasha, my basenji, through Basenji Rescue and Transport. Their volunteer visited me at home (the volunteer's dog pooped and peed on my carpet :( ), made very sure that I knew what I was in for :) and then hooked me up with her previous owners. I don't regret it at all. (Although a basenji and rain is NOT a good combination. She is not happy when wet. We actually had lightening and thunder 15 minutes ago-in California!!!!)
 

Bullwinkle

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I highly recommend a Springer Spaniel. I have a black-and-white field-bred Springer and he is great! A Springer meets all of your requirements, and they are great with kids.

I have had Brittany Spaniels, too, and they are DUMB. My Springer is much smarter than any Brittany that I have ever been around. Brittany's tend to be kind of hyper, too, unless they get to run around alot. (Insert Brittany Spears joke here.)

I also highly recommend working with a rescue organization for whichever breed you choose.

Here is a photo of my dog with my kids:
 

Journeymouse

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If it's any help, I grew up around collies (specifically border collies), beagles, cocker spaniels and wheaten terriers. The collies get my vote as they are (generally) super intelligent and sweet natured, but they should be worked some how because they can often get bored just being pets. Which leads to them being some of the most neurotic animals you'll ever meet (i.e. nuts). The beagles were social, but not terribly smart. The spaniels were very 'memememememememe'. the wheatens looked like sheep with fangs and tended to act like it.
 

PlannerGirl

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sheep with fangs? humm is that too scare off the lonely farm boys?

giggles that was an interesting mental picture this early

*goes back to her morning soda*
 

Chet

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Michael Stumpf said:
Let me make a pitch for rescue organizations. You can get a dog after its "puppy years" that is already trained, and because of the care they get before being placed, you can know something of their disposition before adopting it.
My first Keeshond came from a pet store. My second Keeshond came from a rescue down in Champaign Urbana. We let the pup pick out the other. We knew it was a match made in heaven when the two started humpin' each other. LOL

The feeling you get when an abused and lonely dog finally begins to trust you is awesome.
 
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