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Orlando - Worst place in the nation for pedestrian fatalities

Super Amputee Cat

Cyburbian
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28
Here's an anticle I read today on Yahoo

http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/usatoday/20021121/ts_usatoday/4641404

The report also had this to say about a particular road in Central Florida:

The report singles out a stretch of highway along Florida's west coast -- U.S. Highway 19 in Pasco County, north of St. Petersburg -- as the deadliest reported by any county in the nation in 2001.

A six-lane highway with a speed limit of 45 mph, ''it has few sidewalks or crosswalks and is lined by strip malls and big-box stores set far back from the street,'' the report says. ''While designed for access via automobile, people do walk on this street, and an average of 11 pedestrians die on this stretch of road each year.''


Sounds just like 1000 other no places in America doesn't it?

Highway departments downplay the findings, which should come as no surprise being that most are in bed with the rich contractors and fatcat politicians. I'm sure they are thinking about the horrors of their bloated levels of funding being reduced if dollars were to be siphoned-off to areas that would enhance alternative transportation.

After all, what's the life of a five year old girl impaled in the grille of a Lincoln Navigator in comparison to the billions of dollars that can be spent on pork-barrel project to "fix" roads that aren't broken or widen the 12 lane collector road to the mall.
 

PlannerGirl

Cyburbian Plus
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I have had family in Orlando for a few years now and I hate to drive or walk there. Esp the main drags where all the tourist stuff is-every year folks get smashed trying to go from the hotels across a 6 lane (i think) hwy to Universal at night.

Traffic is bad, many of the drivers have no idea where they are going (they are tourist themselves many dont speak english) you put a hotel across the street from a popular night spot, throw some beer and houston we have a problem.
 

Chet

Cyburbian Emeritus
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Folks just ahve to stop stepping out in front of that danged monorail!
 

Seabishop

Cyburbian
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Not to be morbid but its pretty amazing the way we all just accept all the driving deaths in this country. In the rare cases when some kid runs in front of a train everyone is shocked and wants the system shut down. If you actually think about highway driving as you're doing it you'll have a nervous breakdown.
 

Zoning Goddess

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PlannerGirl hit the nail on the head regarding the tourist areas. They were developed poorly and as tourism increases, the problems just get worse.

Central Florida as a whole is very active in trying to address pedestrian issues. But when you start from the bottom, it's gonna take a long time for the improvements to show.

I have been on the road (US 19) mentioned in the article many times. The problem there is compounded by the fact that the area is very much retirement-oriented, therefore huge numbers of elderly drivers and pedestrians. Not only walking, you're also taking your life in your hands when you drive there.
 

Floridays

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The article in our local paper yesterday stated that 5 of the most dangerous places for peds are in Florida. I've seen a crosswalk on a VERY busy arterial road that has no stoplight. No clue as to how these people make it across the street alive.

However, I've also seen a LOT of "jaywalking" around here, where people just dart out into the street (on bikes and on foot) despite the oncoming traffic.

It also doesn't help that we have some of the RUDEST drivers down here.
 

Cardinal

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Zoning Goddess said:
I have been on the road (US 19) mentioned in the article many times. The problem there is compounded by the fact that the area is very much retirement-oriented, therefore huge numbers of elderly drivers and pedestrians. Not only walking, you're also taking your life in your hands when you drive there.
I have also been on that stretch of highway. The whole Tampa - St. Pete area seems to be filled with these old people who should have stopped driving in the 1970's, still driving their Buicks twenty miles under the limit. Why? Because they are BLIND and have lost their REFLEXES! They think if they just drive slowly they will be okay and won't hit anyone or anything. They can't give up the car because then they could not get to bingo. Okay, so I am ranting a bit. These idiots really annoy me.

Let's add one more criticism to that stretch of road. There are more billboards per square foot than any other highway I have seen.
 

BKM

Cyburbian
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6,464
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I agree with you, Michael. The problem is, independence and adulthood in the US is totally associated with vehicle ownership and driving. Without a car, these folks would basically feel stranded. Even towns that provide jitney services-its not like owning your own car.

My father drove at least two years past the point of no return :( I remember hearing from my mom that once when they were visting my brother in Valparaiso, Indiana (Northwest part of the state), he got totally lost and ended up driving into some somewhat dangerous neighborhoods in Chicago (he somehow got turned around and went the exact opposite direction).
 

Dan

Dear Leader
Staff member
Moderator
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17,668
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Orlando doesn't have too many elderly people, but there are tons of ricers and aggressive rednecks. I doubt pedestrians are the greatest concern of speeding Honda Civics with fart pipes, along with Ford F-350s that have their back windows covered with Dale Earnhardt memorials.

During my tenure in Florida, I've experienced the following:

* Local officials justify the lack of sidewalks. "It's Florida, and it's humid. You'd be crazy to walk more than a few blocks when you're going to sweat like a pig doing so."

* Bus stops that are on streets without sidewalks.

* Entire cities that lack sidewalks along their major traffic corridors, such as "The Town Next Door." Businesses are opposed to sidewalks; there's no access control and most have continuous curb cuts, and they claim sidewalks would take away the easy in-out convenience their mainly truck-based traffic enjoys.

* One street withotu sidewalks that, for some reason, has a huge amount of handicapped scooter traffic on it.

* Regularly honked at when I slow down in school zones.
 
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