• Ongoing coronavirus / COVID-19 discussion: how is the pandemic affecting your community, workplace, and wellness? 🦠

    Working from home? So are we. Come join us! Cyburbia is a friendly big tent, where we share our experiences and thoughts about urban planning practice, planning adjacent topics, and whatever else comes to mind. No ads, no spam, no social distancing.

Parking studies, Part 2

Messages
13
Points
1
After reading the replies to my last posting, it was apparent that I wasn't terribly clear with what I am seeking some help on.

My wife would argue that this happens all the time . . .

I am interested in any studies that look at thetemporal nature of parking and interested if any parking standards have been developed based on the amount of time a parking stall is actually filled with a car. This would be based on use. So, what I am looking for is a breakdown of uses based on time; something like "each stall at a grocery store is used for X minutes, a stall at a fast food establishment is used for X minutes, etc."

I have looked through the ITE’s Parking Council and the APA/PAS reports. Neither really addresses my question.

Any suggestions on where else to look would be greatly appreciated.

If there aren't any such studies, I am thinking of conducting my own such study, which will be non-scientific and strongly biased to conclude exactly what I want. Was I born to be a city planner, or what?
 

ludes98

Cyburbian
Messages
1,264
Points
22
I understand what you are after PTP, but I think parking guidelines based on minutes of use still ignores future uses. The other thread had some good suggestions for how to reduce the seas of parking, but retain abilities to expand it for future uses. Once it gets constructed though, getting a new user to remove it seems...difficult.

That said, I am not seen any studies that look at minutes of parking space occupation based on its associated use. Good luck!
 

Tranplanner

maudit anglais
Messages
7,916
Points
36
I think I said in the previous thread that current parking standards are likely based at least in part on the parking turnover rates associated with various uses. You just need to find those studies I guess. I know they are out there, somewhere.
 

mike gurnee

Cyburbian
Messages
3,066
Points
31
I believe that such data exists, but don't know where. Developers for groceries and drug stores have mentioned that their industry parking standards call for wider stalls than our codes because of the nature of the business and relatively high turnover. Perhaps the Urban Land Institute can help.
 

ludes98

Cyburbian
Messages
1,264
Points
22
mike gurnee said:
Developers for groceries and drug stores have mentioned that their industry parking standards call for wider stalls than our codes because of the nature of the business and relatively high turnover.
I forgot to mention the users! I know our clients do have this specific information, but they consider it essential to their business and would never release it.
 

jresta

Cyburbian
Messages
1,474
Points
23
I would try contacting Whole Foods Market and see if they will divulge their information. They have two stores in center city, one with a smallish surface lot (60 spaces?) and another with a zero lot line on all 4 sides with two floors of parking above it.

This is interesting to me b/c they got a variance for the parking requirement in both instances - they had their own numbers for what kind of auto trips they would generate and how long those customers would spend in the store, on average, and i must say that the lot is always full but you never have to hunt for a space there's always someone just pulling out. The garage on the other hand has much less traffic. Half of the spaces seem to be taken up by employees (they all park on the second level) while the first level might have half of the spaces empty.

But then they also must've had a lot of data on what their walk-up business was going to be like and what demographic was going to be walking up and for what - and who was going to be driving and for what.
 

ablarc

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
713
Points
20
If more of them did this and if they didn't have to get a variance to do the right thing, many damaged urban areas would heal up quickly. It should not, however be required, though it should perhaps be subsidized as a public utility, such as highways or public transit.
 

Wulf9

Member
Messages
923
Points
22
I know this doesn't answer the question, but it is a good way to address parking for changes of use and for reasonable mix of uses.

If parking is non-exclusive (like downtown parking), and there is a reasonable mix of uses, you can do with a lot less than most suburban requirements.

Also, if the nonexclusive parking is managed by the city, there are lots of ways to make parking more effective. Just be sure you provide the parking for cars, not revenue.
 

Streck

Cyburbian
Messages
610
Points
18
I wonder if city parking meter revenues would be a good source of information. If revenues are broken down by areas, zones, streets, etc. Also, some cities are deciding that parking is allowed for one hour in some places, two hours in others, etc. may be somewhat useful.

Why is the info needed?
 
Top