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Parks & Recreation Requirements

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5,352
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31
I'm working on a brownfields project that involves the redevelopment of the site into a park and recreational facility. Does anyone know of any good websites and/or references that may give me some direction in terms of dimensions for soccer fields, tennis courts, baseball diamonds (particularly the clover leaf design), etc. and recommended parking spaces for those uses? Thanks.
 

Bunabayashi

Cyburbian
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27
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2
Planderella said:
I'm working on a brownfields project that involves the redevelopment of the site into a park and recreational facility. Does anyone know of any good websites and/or references that may give me some direction in terms of dimensions for soccer fields, tennis courts, baseball diamonds (particularly the clover leaf design), etc. and recommended parking spaces for those uses? Thanks.
How are you remediating the impacted areas? Just curious,

Dave
 

giff57

Corn Burning Fool
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
5,436
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33
Planderella said:
I'm working on a brownfields project that involves the redevelopment of the site into a park and recreational facility. Does anyone know of any good websites and/or references that may give me some direction in terms of dimensions for soccer fields, tennis courts, baseball diamonds (particularly the clover leaf design), etc. and recommended parking spaces for those uses? Thanks.

This should help

http://www.epa.gov/superfund/programs/recycle/tools/r_apx.pdf
 

martini

Cyburbian
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679
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19
I did a project that used athleic feild measurements last year. Let me go dig it up at school tomorrw and I'll get them up here for you.
 

boilerplater

Cyburbian
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21
Let's let the kids play in the arsenic and heavy metal sandbox!

Surely you've looked in "Timesaver Stasndards for Landscape Architecture"? It has field dimensions for any sport from archery to yachting. Well, at least typical dimensions for yachts.

Are you considering any phytoremediation techniques for the soil?
 
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Bunabayashi said:
How are you remediating the impacted areas? Just curious,

Dave
The site has already been capped but the DEQ is suggesting another 2 foot cap on top of that. Right now, the redevelopment plans are just conceptual but they still have to reflect reuses that don't penetrate the caps.
 
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Planderella said:
The site has already been capped but the DEQ is suggesting another 2 foot cap on top of that. Right now, the redevelopment plans are just conceptual but they still have to reflect reuses that don't penetrate the caps.
I am curious -- if you know, can you tell me what the contamination of the site is? (Environmental Resource Management major here.)
 
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Michele Zone said:
I am curious -- if you know, can you tell me what the contamination of the site is? (Environmental Resource Management major here.)
I haven't read the entire Phase I and II reports, but from my understanding, there was very little contamination (maybe some asbestos) at the site - it was a former landfill.
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
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10,080
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34
Planderella said:
I haven't read the entire Phase I and II reports, but from my understanding, there was very little contamination (maybe some asbestos) at the site - it was a former landfill.
Landfills are often a problem, if not for contaminants, then for methane and settling. Wisconsin has a statewide set of rules for construction on closed landfills. Do you have anything comparable?
 

Bunabayashi

Cyburbian
Messages
27
Points
2
Planderella said:
The site has already been capped but the DEQ is suggesting another 2 foot cap on top of that. Right now, the redevelopment plans are just conceptual but they still have to reflect reuses that don't penetrate the caps.
Awwww, say it isn't so! :-\

Capping sucks. Phytoremediation is the way to go!
 
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Thanks for all the info. :) Another one of my tasks with this project is to research and suggest alternatives for site cleanup. I will definitely look into Phytoremediation.
 

Trail Nazi

Cyburbian
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2,779
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24
What kind of fields are you wanting to develop? Are they for adult or children? Our parking calculations are based on the size of field. For a full-sized rectangular or diamond, we estimate approximately 50 parking spaces. For the smaller fields, we estimate 35. How large is the brownfield that you are developing? You will want to keep in mind that if you are doing primarily fields, the stacking time between events. If you park plans to have field lighting, your parking needs may need to be slightly adjusted higher.

The following link is from our Needs Assessment Survey, which provides some information about LOS. I am not sure if you need any of that info, but it has truly helped us for our park master planning projects. For Fairfax County, we found that we mostly need rectangular fields since that seems to be the highest demanding item for our park system. Your demographics may be a little different, but since there are so many field sports out there.
http://www.fairfaxcounty.gov/parks/needsassessment0803.htm

This following link will connect you to the Fairfax County Public Facilities Manual, which is what we use to develop the size of our fields, courts, etc when we have the developers dedicate these items to us. It also gives you information about the engineering of the items.
http://www.fairfaxcounty.gov/gov/DPWES/publications/pfm/plates/8.htm

If you need some additional information about parking calcs, I will be happy to email you the information if you let me know.
 

Rem

Cyburbian
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1,524
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23
Cardinal said:
Landfills are often a problem, if not for contaminants, then for methane and settling. Wisconsin has a statewide set of rules for construction on closed landfills. Do you have anything comparable?
Cardinal is right about methane. The Council I worked for in Sydney developed a Netball complex on a former landfill. One evening a meter box on a light pole exploded when the lights came on - apparently it had been filling with methane. Most large, modern landfills have methane capture and power generation systems designed into them in Australia.

Another real, very long term issue is the management of contaminated groundwater. We have a few disused landfills and the closest to a closed system we have is the re-irrigation of cleaned leachate and the treatment of the removed contaminants (we can dispose to sewer, within limits). It is quite difficult to get the water back to any sort of useable standard because of the unpredictable nature of the cocktail. I reckon it wouldn't be suitable for playing fields. Our irrigation water is applied to the revegetating cap.
 

Bunabayashi

Cyburbian
Messages
27
Points
2
Planderella said:
Thanks for all the info. :) Another one of my tasks with this project is to research and suggest alternatives for site cleanup. I will definitely look into Phytoremediation.
I can help, if you'd like to have a conversation about it please let me know.

Dave
 
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Landfills can be highly contaminated. The EPA estimates that 90% of hazardous waste is disposed of improperly and a lot of things that are hazardous fly under the radar of the rcra. For example, batteries are often simply thrown in the trash, which then goes to a landfill. They contain lead and other heavy metals. There are (at least) two victims of heavy metal poisoning in the homeschooling with chronic illness group that I belong to (a group with 37 members, last time I checked). Heavy metal poisoning is hard to diagnose, difficult to treat and very incapacitating.

And, as Rem noted, methane is explosive and there have been incidents of people being injured due to explosions on ball fields built over old landfills here in the US. Methane can also migrate laterally, representing a potential hazard to nearby structures that are not directly over the old landfill site. A lot of places here in the US capture the methane (as Rem described) for use as a fuel. Where there's methane, there is also inevitably settling. Methane is created by decomposition and when it leaves the ground, that means there is less physical material left behind. Whole trucks have been known to disappear into sink holes in former landfills.
 

donk

Cyburbian
Messages
6,970
Points
30
Planderella said:
Thanks for all the info. :) Another one of my tasks with this project is to research and suggest alternatives for site cleanup. I will definitely look into Phytoremediation.
You may also want to talk to the people in Windsor, Ontario. The have/are in the process of rehabbing an old dump into a park. I think they clay capped it first. It is the only hill of note in the entire city. (seriously)
 
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