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Part 4

BKM

Cyburbian
Messages
6,464
Points
29
Reading is living in 1957. A plastic belting factory is precisely the kind of factory that will quickly move its operations to Mexico within five years.
 

SW MI Planner

Cyburbian
Messages
3,195
Points
26
Afterward, Forbes said he moved his wife and children from KVP's former location in Sacramento, Calif., and bought a house in Sinking Spring based on the understanding the new factory would be approved.

“I'm not sure the planning commission understands how many lives they are messing with,” he said.
Cry me a river..... Maybe they shouldn't have jumped the gun and moved before even having approval.
 

michaelskis

Cyburbian
Messages
19,853
Points
47
The sad part about all of this is that we in the office have had a lot of e-mails and phone calls voicing support for everything, but no one voiced anything positive at the council meeting last night. I just hope that some one at least will show up for the final meeting, before they vote to increase the members to 9, so they would have the votes they need.

Has this type of thing happened to any one else? When council has completely rearranged a board to get their way???
 

donk

Cyburbian
Messages
6,970
Points
30
If it really is that bad of an idea, I'd suggest that the board had better look at the ideas of "natural justice" and decision making .

Technically, they should start the process over so that the new members can hear the presentations, read the reports and make an informed decision. If not they might be open to appeal. (That is how it works here)
 

biscuit

Cyburbian
Messages
3,904
Points
25
I'm curious as to why they need that particular site? If, as you said, there are other more suitable places for the plant in the city, why are the mayor and the company owner so hung up on those specific nine acres?
 

michaelskis

Cyburbian
Messages
19,853
Points
47
We are not sure about why they want this site. There is location that is larger, at a site that we just took down an old chain factory. It has great access, and walk to work possibilities. We are looking at turning it into a light industrial park, and this would be a terrific anchor for that site. They have site surveyors, and there was some concern on safety. But the company plans on putting up a large fence with barb wire.
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
Messages
10,081
Points
34
The more I learn of it, the more this deal takes on a bad odor. This souds like a very good example of the worst kind of economic development. I'll bet nobody did any economic impact analysis - even a "back-of-a-napkin" one - or more people would be up in arms over it. Forget the issue of the location. This still stinks, and here's why:

- This has all the earmarks of a "footloose" firm. It could pick up its operations and move them across the country. It can operate in a temporary location. It would would carry out all of these activities without formal approvals and contracts with the city. Don't count on it to stay once the incentives are used up.

- The business is incentive-chasing, and the city is falling for it. What is being offered? free land, no property taxes, and an enterprise zone that probably offers a whole series of additional employment, sales and income taxes. Are there brownfield or other grants being thrown in? That is a hell of a big incentive package.

- How many jobs are being created, and better yet, what pay and benefits do they offer? My guess is that most of the jobs filled by locals are going to be low-skilled positions, with low pay. These jobs appear to be the only benefit the city gets, as it has given up everything else. Is the cost worth it?

Your economic development people screwed up badly. They should have never made any promises to the company without first securing the approvals they needed, and then they should have worked closely with city staff to ensure that the project would not hit any snags. That would have begun by selecting the appropriate location. Above and beyond that, they need to reconsider whether this project really creates any benefit for the city. I have seen nothing to suggest that this was done. It really appears to me that they are incompetent.
 

NHPlanner

A shadow of my former self
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
9,914
Points
40
I'll echo Stumpf's comments.....bad ED.

One of the good things about working in NH, we have no such incentives to use, and usually end up with decent companies that are here for the long haul.
 

michaelskis

Cyburbian
Messages
19,853
Points
47
NHPlanner said:
I'll echo Stumpf's comments.....bad ED.
YES!!!! You are completely right. Also, I completely agree with your comments. ALL OF THEM. There are no brown field grants being used, but there is a good chuck of CDBG to cover the 108 loans, which no one in this city every pays back, and the CD office foots the payments.

This whole thing is so messed up with this whole thing that the entire planning staff is now looking for another job. (Because we are sick of the BS)
 
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