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Perceptions of Oklahoma City

Oklahoma City most matches which of these in national presence, in your mind?

  • Little Rock

    Votes: 18 28.6%
  • Indianapolis

    Votes: 13 20.6%
  • Louisville

    Votes: 12 19.0%
  • Nashville

    Votes: 6 9.5%
  • Ft. Worth

    Votes: 14 22.2%

  • Total voters
    63
  • Poll closed .

oulevin

Cyburbian
Messages
178
Points
7
Which of these cities, in your minds, most matches Oklahoma City in terms of national presence?
 
Last edited:

Repo Man

Cyburbian
Messages
2,550
Points
25
I would say Little Rock. I have not been to either Little Rock or Oklahoma City, but I kind of have the same perception of both of them.
 

Dan

Dear Leader
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
17,794
Points
58
Nashville. Same population, one of two major sities in a relatively anonymous state.

OKC's presence seemed much larger in the early 1980s, during the oil boom.
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
Messages
10,080
Points
34
I kinda liked Nashville. I did some work there when I worked for the dark side. The people I was screwing were very nice.
 

Dan

Dear Leader
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
17,794
Points
58
Michael Stumpf said:
I kinda liked Nashville. I did some work there when I worked for the dark side. The people I was screwing were very nice.
[ot]Like ... a certain girl pictured on a billboard?[/ot]
 

oulevin

Cyburbian
Messages
178
Points
7
perceptions of OKC

Well, after about a week, this native Oklahoma Citian doesn't know whether to cheer or not. I simply see its status as a capital city of a plain jane state as the predominant impression. Going in, I actually thought Louisville and Ft. Worth would be the top vote-getters, split between its heartland and western characters, but apparently that's not the case. I've noticed the references to Omaha; in fact, I debated between placing that and Louisville in the poll.

Now let me ask all of those who responded to the poll: have you actually been to OKC? Being there and seeing it portrayed in the mainstream media (I croaked at some network correspondents' questions during the bombing coverage) can be two different things.
 

Lee Nellis

Cyburbian
Messages
1,371
Points
29
Grew up not too far away and my perception is that OKC is more on the order of Wichita or Omaha or Lubbock than any of the places you listed (although I don't know Ft. Worth well enough to say)._Not to start a fight, as I have no real stake in it, but my perception is that Tulsa is Oklahoma's more interesting city.
 

oulevin

Cyburbian
Messages
178
Points
7
OKC/Tulsa

Lee, you little...no, j/k. Yes, I've acknowleged the fact that Tulsa is indeed more cosmopolitan than OKC. When OK was a oil center, the companies would locate their HQs in Tulsa (for its scenic beauty) and operations in OKC, where the oil actually was. Tulsa benefitted from the oil barons' philanthropy much more than OKC did. As a result, OKC is much more working class than Tulsa, whereas Tulsans are accustomed to the good life, with a very respectable arts scene.

I will throw this in, however. That good life on the great plains has caused Tulsans to get complacent. We in OKC, however, passed a capital improvement program in the hundreds of millions of dollars in order to resurrect our downtown, and are planning another round of projects. We would not have approached central city development with such vigor if things were comfortable.
 

sal95

Cyburbian
Messages
65
Points
4
Well, I've been to Oklahoma City and each of the cities listed in the poll, and I don't agree with any of the choices. I would say Wichita, KS or Amarillo, TX are more similar to OKC. I place these in the collective category of sure there are a few things to do, a couple of good municipal projects that have occurred, but still just blah. Just my 2 cents.
 

peter lowitt

Member
Messages
42
Points
3
OK OKC

My folks live in Norman. OKC reminds me more to Texas communities than the midwest/south. I've been in the big O (Omaha to the uninitiated) and they are more different than similar in my perspective.
 

Floridays

Cyburbian
Messages
769
Points
21
I'm from Norman (go OU!) and, until recently, have lived there for most of my life. Unfortunately, most people's perception of OKC is related to the bombing incident. However, I would agree with some of the other Cyburia-ites and think it most closely resembles a city such as Wichita, KS or perhaps somewhere in the State of Texas.
 

el Guapo

Capitalist
Messages
5,984
Points
29
Got me a ticket once in on I35 in OKC for driving with out-of-state plates 10 mph slower than the Okies passing me. I plan to return once it is annexed by Texas and properly subjigated. :)
 

Chet

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
10,624
Points
34
Cardinal said:
I am currently denying any paternity claims.
Good Choice. Angy-Mr. Clean-Man looks like he'd grunt. Then kill.
 

Dan

Dear Leader
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
17,794
Points
58
Chet said:
Good Choice. Angy-Mr. Clean-Man looks like he'd grunt. Then kill.
[ot]Og smash baby. Then Og smash Cardinal! Grrrrrrrr!

[/ot]
 

mgk920

Cyburbian
Messages
4,202
Points
26
I do note that OKC is one of the few larger cities in the USA that essentially completed its extensive 1950s/1960s era planned freeway network. I sense that OKC is a very spread out, low-density place, on a par with other similar 'Plains' cities like Wichita, KS, Wichita Falls, TX, Amarillo, TX, Omaha, NE, Lincoln, NE, etc, too.

Despite the state's incredibly generous-to-cities annexation law and the city's truly massive land area, am I also correct in my observation that the City of Oklahoma City is now completely, or almost completely, surrounded by incorporated suburbs?

MIke
 

narrator

Member
Messages
23
Points
2
mike gurnee said:
I believe they are all about the same in terms of national presence.
I think Indianapolis has slightly more presence then the others mentioned...it's the 12th largest city in the country and one of the largest state capitals (maybe the largest?) and hosts alot of national events....

none of the others seem to stand out any more then one another....
 

Plannerbabs

Cyburbian
Messages
1,038
Points
23
el Guapo said:
Wichita or Omaha in my mind's eye. Indy has that jazz OKC is missing.
[OT] Indy has jazz? Where?? ;) [/OT]
OKC always seems to blend in with Little Rock and Ft. Worth and other plains cities in my mind. Not huge, not that small. I haven't been to any of them (yet), but OKC for some reason seems a little more "cowboy" than some of the other cities on the list, like Louisville or Indy. Maybe just 'cause it's farther West.
 

Joe Iliff

Reformed City Planner
Messages
1,441
Points
29
Plannerbabs said:
[OT] Indy has jazz? Where?? ;) [/OT]
[OT]Slippery Noodle[/OT]

I'd say Louisville or Little Rock. Nashville is known worldwide, and Indianapolis has plenty of national and international events. Fort Worth would have some similarities, but being part of the DFW metroplex, it really doesn't compare to OKC much.

Like Little Rock, OKC is a capital and largest city in the state, and centrally located. Louisville isn't the state capital or centrally located, and is just down the road (or river) from Cincinnati. So, I'll say OKC is most like Little Rock. (Aren't they on the same river? The Arkansas? Or does that go through Tulsa?)
 

The One

Cyburbian
Messages
8,289
Points
29
I think.....

OKC might equate better with Tulsa.....at least in my mind.........he he he......I suspect these might be fightn' words in OK.....anyone know.....? :D ;) :-c
 

Trinity Moses

Member
Messages
229
Points
9
oulevin said:
Now let me ask all of those who responded to the poll: have you actually been to OKC? Being there and seeing it portrayed in the mainstream media (I croaked at some network correspondents' questions during the bombing coverage) can be two different things.
Yeah, I spent a week there on buisiness and as part of this drove all over town (which included suburbs like Edmond, Moore and Norman) meeting w. real estate folks, city govts, etc...and then did some driving around after work too...so I am somewhat familiar w. the area.

I think the place really sucks...though that edge city on the NW side was sort of interesting. I think OKC reminds me more of San Antonio than any of the other places you mentioned. I used to live in Louisville for many years and I can tell you OKC is nothing like Louisville...nor Indianapolis..Indy has a much better downtown.
 

jresta

Cyburbian
Messages
1,474
Points
23
Never been to OKC . . .

I tend to think of cities in terms of their signatures - their skylines. When i think about it i can't picture one for OKC or Little Rock.

Little Rock - I've never been but from what i hear and things i've seen it seems like a small city. Smaller than OKC would be. Actually the first thing that comes to mind is Bill Clinton


Indianapolis - I've only driven through it but it seems much bigger (and more urban) than OKC would be and much more important financially.


Louisville - I've been here, to a music festival, and while it might be similar in population i think of Louisville as being more urban - and since i know of it for its music scene the connection i make to it is a cultural one. As far as the physical aspects of this city, it reminds me most of Rochester, NY.


Nashville - I've also been here and when i think of a sister-city for Nashville i think Charlotte, NC. The topography is a bit different but they're similar in size, they have well developed financial sectors, reflected in robust skylines (for cities of their size) - and they both have the young NFL team thing happening.


Ft. Worth - Never been but Ft. Worth seems like the St. Paul to Minneapolis, the New Jersey to NYC. Probably great places but no one claims they're from there.


OKC -
 

Doohickie

Cyburbian
Messages
1,859
Points
27
Joe Iliff said:

I'd say Louisville or Little Rock. Nashville is known worldwide, and Indianapolis has plenty of national and international events. Fort Worth would have some similarities, but being part of the DFW metroplex, it really doesn't compare to OKC much.
As a Fort Worth resident, I used to think OKC was similar in terms of status. In talking to people who have lived both places, though, they said OKC is closer to Amarillo or Wichita Falls, which are significantly smaller and less, uh.... for lack of a better word, cosmopolitan. People tend to lump Fort Worth in with Dallas, but there really is a clear divide between the two cities, with Dallas being more Eastern or Midwestern in nature, and Fort Worth more Western. And even without Dallas or even Arlington, Fort Worth all by itself ranks 20th in the nation in population, larger than both Boston and Washington, D.C.

I almost got through the post without mentioning it, but what the heck: One person who compared OKC to Amarillo also made the comment: Fort Worth and Oklahoma City both started out as "Cowtowns". Fort Worth continues to use the moniker to aknowledge its roots and encourage tourism, but has moved on. He said that Oklahoma City still is a Cowtown though (I think he meant "podunk").
 

psylo

Cyburbian
Messages
186
Points
7
The one time I went to Little Rock, I thought it looks very similar to OKC. The town that really reminds me of OKC for some reason is Omaha. I have no idea why, but for some reason it does.
 

okc453

Member
Messages
8
Points
0
It's more similar than you think!

I hate to resurrect an old thread but I found this through a google image search and was introduced to the Cyburbia forums, so here goes...

Actually Oklahoma City is much more similar to the cities that were cited "larger" and "more important" in this discussion than it is to Little Rock and Wichita- two cities that are much smaller and less important (especially Wichita) than OKC. OKC is quite important in a historic sense since the 1995 terrorist attack that was at the time the largest ever on American soil, and in an urban planning sense since MAPS was passed in 1993, a program that has now sparked $2.5 billion in investment downtown, a number that is climbing exponentially, in addition to creating several one-of-a-kind cultural and entertainment attractions.

Indianapolis has a canal, and so does Oklahoma City. It is the capital and largest city, in the geographic center of the state. By the way, Oklahoma City also has a big history in jazz- one district downtown that is the spark to one of the most remarkable residential comebacks in the city lately is "Deep Deuce," an area where African Americans lived and several famous jazz artists have come from.

Louisville is undergoing a lot of urban change, including a riverfront development project, and so is Oklahoma City. Louisville deserves a pro sports team and wants one, so does OKC.

Fort Worth has a Stockyards area, and Oklahoma City has a similar area called Stockyard City that is basically the same thing. Fort Worth is underappreciated, and so is OKC.

Little Rock should definitely be comparable to OKC because it also has a very successful urban revitilization program, but it is really more like Tulsa, its sister city on the Arkansas River.

I will not say that Oklahoma City is not a cowtown- because it is, at heart. But these days Oklahoma City is a role model in urban reinvention and planning, a hotbed of bioscience and health/technology research, a diverse city with sizeable and distinct Asian, Hispanic, and African American communities, and a beautiful city with many parks and lakes that actually has a lot smarter growth than it COULD have had, with more than 500,000 people fitting comfortably into 1/3 of the city's land area.

I'm interested to know if perceptions have changed at all since Oklahoma City began hosting the Hornets NBA team- this has given the city a lot of global publicity, and I know the big-city-fun feeling that has given OKC the nickname "Loud City" has certainly surprised the NBA and the entire pro sports community. People simply have no idea or perception of what Oklahoma City is like, so it is lumped in with smaller cities that also seem to have no character to the mainstream public- but this is changing as more and more major events come to OKC. Lately with the Hornets there has been a burst of civic pride and outside attention that has already added even more momentum to the excellent changes occurring in urban Oklahoma City.

Finally, some pictures for anyone who doesn't want to read:

Bricktown


A great view of the city that can unfortunately only be had from a highrise (I think this is from Founders Tower)


From The Classen condos between Midtown and the Asia District.


CBD, Park Avenue
street3.jpg

Galleria Parking Garage, Under Construction
 
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