• We're a fun, friendly, and diverse group of planners, placemakers, students, and other folks who found their people here. Create your FREE Cyburbia ID, and join us today! Use your email address, or register through your Reddit, Facebook, Google, Twitter, or Microsoft account.

Parking Permit Parking Regulations

parkstreet

Member
Messages
1
Points
0
I am doing a project on permit parking in a university area. A problem seems to exist in that anyone who lives on the street can have a permit, therefore if a landlord takes a single family house and divides it into multiple apartments, all those residents can have a permit. This is causing a parking shortage.

Does anyone know of a city who restricts permit parking by the amount of frontage a house has, the number of people or in any other way?

Thanks.
 

donk

Cyburbian
Messages
6,970
Points
29
The easiest way would be to say that only 2 or 3 permits will be issued per civic address unless the property is zoned for multiple dwelling units.

The other way is to have an increasing fee for each additional permit. (ie 1 permit = $25, 2 permits = $50 each, 3 permits = $75 each and so on) I think Windsor, Ontario went this route with a maximum number of permits available per address.
 

Repo Man

Cyburbian
Messages
2,550
Points
24
The City of Milwaukee has a policy in "high impact parking areas" (or something like that) which allows 1 daytime parking pass for each dwelling unit. So if you make your home into a duplex, you get two passes. These restrictions are only in place near college campuses and maybe downtown.

For night parking, anyone can walk into the police station and get a night parking permit.
 

Jeff

Cyburbian
Messages
4,161
Points
27
Where I went to school, West Chester, PA, 2 parking permits were given out for every electric bill.

Meaning you needed your lease (or mortgage) and the electric bill with your name on it. And one little catch, your car had to be registered in PA. Out of state students got screwed on that one.
 
Messages
5
Points
0
The problem you have with a residential parking program that does not allow residents to obtain a permit is that such a decision would be arbitrary and capricious . I have worked in City Goverenment for the last 20 years and started in the New Orleans Residential Parking Program. There are a few Supreme Court Decisions as I recall that govern why the program has to be administered in a manner that is not arbitrary and capricious . I would suggest rather that you require any resident to have their car registered to that address before they are allowed to recieve a permit and have them bring in their car registration to prove it. In New Orleans this tended to restrict the number of residents participating in the program because either: 1) They did not want to reregister their vehicle because of monitery advantages of where the car was currently registered; or 2) they really did not reside at the address they were trying to recieve a permit for. In a university I imagine that the out of state students who reside in the area may not want to change their vehicle regitration, especially if they go back home after finishihing their schooling.
 
Top