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place names

Tom R

Cyburbian
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2,274
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Pa. has a LOT of strange place names. Of course there's Intercourse (just before you get to Paradise), but there's Mars, Slate Lick, Transylvania and Tidiute along with a multitude of other Native American names that are almost impossible to pronounce let alone spell. Care to add to the list?
 

Tranplanner

maudit anglais
Messages
7,903
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34
*Mod hat on*
I figured we were getting far enough off-track from the Washington DC thread to start a new one
*Mod hat off*

Here are two off the top of my head

Dildo, Newfoundland
Climax, Saskatchewan (Sign on way out of town says "Come again soon)
 

Jeff

Cyburbian
Messages
4,161
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27
Don't you dare forget Blue Ball, PA

Or ... Bird in Hand, PA
 
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NHPlanner

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How 'bout these (from http://www.strangecosmos.com/read.asp?JokeID=2010):

Actual Town Names from

Shafter (California, USA)

Beaver (Oklahoma, USA)

Shitlingthorpe (Yorkshire, UK)

Bastard (Norway)

Twatt (Orkney, UK)

Muff (Northern Ireland)

Wankie (Zimbabwe)

Climax (Colorado, USA)

Nobber (Donegal, Ireland)

Lickey End (West Midlands, UK)

Fukum (Yemen)

Lord Berkeley's Knob (Sutherland, Scotland)

Dildo (Newfoundland, Canada)

Turdo (Romania)

Dongo (Congo, Democratic Republic)

Seymen (Turkey)

Dong Rack (Thailand-Cambodia border)

Intercourse (Pennsylvania, USA)

Brown Willy (Cornwall,UK)

Wanks River (Nicaragua)

Wankendorf (Schleswig-Holstein, Germany)

Fuku (Shensi, China)

Beaver Head (Idaho, USA)

Fukui (Honshu, Japan)

Shag Island (Indian Ocean)

Fukue (Honshu, Japan)

Middle Intercourse Island (Australia)

Wankie Colliery (Zimbabwe)

Chinaman's Knob (Australia)

Wet Beaver Creek (Australia)

Tittybong (Australia)

Pis Pis River (Nicaragua)

Dikshit (India)

Wankener (India)

Sexmoan (Luzon, Philippines)

Beaver Lick, Knob Lick, Red Bush, Gays Creek, Fisty, Dykes, Breeding (Kentucky, USA)
Submitted by J.C. Anderson

Belchertown (Massachusetts, USA)
Submitted by Jenn

Tit-Ary (Siberia)
Submitted by J.C. Anderson

Bra (Italy)
Submitted by J.C. Anderson

Assen and Dikanas (Sweden)
Submitted by J.C. Anderson

Beaver City and Floyd's Knobs (Indiana, USA)
Submitted by J.C. Anderson

Frazier's Bottom (West Virginia, USA)
Submitted by J.C. Anderson

Alison's Gap, Bumpass and Ballsville (Virginia, USA)
Submitted by J.C. Anderson

Knockemstiff and Round Bottom (Ohio, USA)
Submitted by J.C. Anderson

Colon and Cumnock (North Carolina, USA)
Submitted by J.C. Anderson

Kickapoo, Red Dick and Pink Staff (Illinois, USA)
Submitted by J.C. Anderson

Butts (Georgia, USA)
Submitted by J.C. Anderson

Nutbush, Love Lady and Big Lick (Tennessee, USA)

Gay (Oklahoma, USA)
Submitted by J.C. Anderson

Tightwad (Missouri, USA)
Submitted by J.C. Anderson

Blue Ball, Hooker and Bald Knob (Arkansas, USA)
Submitted by J.C. Anderson

Phuket (Thailand)
Submitted by J.C. Anderson

Condom (France)
Submitted by J.C. Anderson

Buttsville (New Jersey, USA)
Submitted by Gretchen D.

Spread Eagle (Newfoundland)
Submitted by Garry C.

Intercourse (Pennsylvania, USA)
Submitted by Catherine J.

Puseyville (Pennsylvania, USA)
Submitted by Catherine J.

Blue Ball (Pennsylvania, USA)
Submitted by Jim P.

Big Beaver (Saskatchewan, Canada)
Submitted by Brian K.

Athol (Idaho, USA)
Submitted by Shannon F.

Wankers Corner (Oregon, USA)
Submitted by Jamie K.

Mianus (Connecticut, USA)
Submitted by Jamie K.

Fucu (Mozambique)
Submitted by Jamie K.

Sac City (Iowa, USA)

Tingley (Iowa, USA)

Slut (Vasterbotten, Sweden)
Submitted by Jamie K.

Crappo (Maryland, USA)

Busti (New York, USA)

Gaysport (Ohio, USA)

Jugtown (Pennsylvania, USA)

Ass Rock (Newfoundland, Canada)

Study Butte (Texas, USA)

Humptulips (Washington, USA)

Dorking (Surrey, Great Britain)

Wank (Bavaria)

Ass Hill (Newfoundland, Canada)

Blow Me Down (Newfoundland, Canada)

Old Man's Head (Newfoundland, Canada)

Meat Cove (Nova Scotia, Canada)

Shitagoo Lake (Quebec, Canada)

Smuts (Saskatchewan, Canada)

Boob Creek (Alaska, USA)

Gayville and Fruitdale (South Dakota, USA)
Submitted by Bill M.

Tatitlik (Alaska, USA)
Submitted by Matthew C.

Bald Knob (Illinois, USA)
Submitted by Patrick M.

Fertile (Minnesota, USA)
Submitted by Brian M.

Horneytown (North Carolina, USA)
Submitted by Brian M.

Meat Camp (North Carolina, USA)
Submitted by Brian M.

French Lick (Indiana, USA)
Submitted by Scott M.

Reddick (Florida, USA)
Submitted by Piotr R.

Virginville (Pennsylvania, USA)
Submitted by Nicky W.

Conception Bay (Newfoundland)
Submitted by Jennifer

Yorky's Knob (Queensland, Australia)
Submitted by Patrick M.

Crested Butte (Colorado, USA)
Submitted by Lauren F.

Big Ugly (West Virginia, USA)
Submitted by Kent

Piddle-in-the-Hole (England)
Submitted by Tony P.

Blueball (Pennsylvania, USA)
Submitted by Rose

Shag Harbour (Nova Scotia)
Submitted by Patrick C.

Come by Chance (Newfoundland)
Submitted by Patrick C.

Dick Knob (Australia)
Submitted by Edi W.
 

donk

Cyburbian
Messages
6,970
Points
29
While not really a place name,

there is exit 69,big beaver road in detroit

now for ones around me

kouchibouguac

miramichi

rusagonis - pronounced rush a gornis

calais -pronounced callous

ste louis de ha ha (PQ)

Kennebecasis River

Otnabog - as in out in the bog

I am sure NS has some good ones too.
 

Tom R

Cyburbian
Messages
2,274
Points
24
Names

I want to find "Nowhere" just so I can be in the middle of it some day.
There's an office/restaurant in Akron named Canal Place. I always said they should drop the first C.
 

NHPlanner

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A couple more Canadian ones, ones I passed signs for on my honeymoon travels:

Quispamsis, NB

Crapaud, PEI

Uigg, PEI

Knutsford, PEI
 

Dan

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nerudite

Cyburbian
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6,544
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Just pull out a map of Manitoba, Saskatchewan, or Alberta and you'll find a bunch of bizarre names. Medicine hat, Moose Jaw, etc. etc.

There is a cliff/canyon in Alberta called "Head Smashed in Buffalo Jump." Guess what it was used for?
.


For cities, I always liked Truth or Consequences, N.M. myself

Tom R said:
Mourningwood?
Uhhhhh... like your morning kickstand.
 
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mike gurnee

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3,066
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30
Tom R, Ky has a Nonesuch.

The state is full of what would in other areas be mis-pronunciations:

Athens "A-thens"
Yosemite "Yo-sa-mite"
Versailles "Ver-Sales"
And then there is the largest city, Louisville: named after that great King of France, King "Loo-a" XIV
 

Tom R

Cyburbian
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2,274
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nerudite said:


Uhhhhh... like your morning kickstand.
I'm really getting slow in my old age.

There's allways the Grand Teton Mountains.
 
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masafer

Cyburbian
Messages
32
Points
2
While not quite as... uhhm... explicit as most of these others, there's always Yeehaw Junction, FL.
 

nerudite

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mike gurnee said:
Tom R, Ky has a Nonesuch.

The state is full of what would in other areas be mis-pronunciations:

Athens "A-thens"
Yosemite "Yo-sa-mite"
Versailles "Ver-Sales"
And then there is the largest city, Louisville: named after that great King of France, King "Loo-a" XIV
This happens a lot... it's always a little strange when you hear someone pronounce something correct for their region, but it's the opposite of what another town calls itself in another state. Like... Des Moines, WA... with no silent letters.

Or uh... Goethe Park in Sacramento. Pronounced Gerta, the way I was tought? Nope... more like Geh-ty. The first time I heard that name, I had no idea where the person was talking about. It dawned on me two days later that we were both talking about the same park.
 

Dan

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SouthSideSlayer said:
check this map:


That's BAD. I really, really hope that was renamed. It's not like a place called "Indian Creek" or "Squak Peak" ... that is damn offensive. Still, though, I'm glad you posted it. It's scary that such names existed a while ago. Call me naive, but was it because such terms weren't thought of as offensive, or was it because people just didn't care?

and this link:
http://www.topozone.com/map.asp?z=12&n=3635276&e=361939&s=25
[/QUOTE]

Here's a picture. This thread is safely rated R now.

Did a bit of research.

Yup, the brook is renamed.

Nope ... it's not much better by today's standards, but the intent of the renaming was meant well. In 1963, there was a federal mandate ordering the elimination of the "N word" from all place names in the United States. The word was replaced with "negro," which at the time as considered an acceptable and dignified term.
 
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Messages
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Brief Hijack Alert

Dan - if you find those place names offensive, then check out the following article:



The Scientist 5[23]:0, Nov. 25, 1991




Opinion

Racist Relics: An Ugly Blight On Our Botanical Nomenclature
By Melvin Hunter

Date: November 25, 1991

Racism is a disease afflicting every level of society. The symptoms are as obvious as a cross burning or as subtle as a schoolteacher's subconsciously lowered expectations. Its presence casts an ugly shadow across society--unfortunately, even into our flower gardens and the language that scientists use to describe their inhabitants.

Sad to say, a number of racially offensive common plant names long ago slipped into the vernacular of gardening, and some have found their way into horticulture's most important reference books. Sadder still is the fact that several of these offensive names are still in common use. And most amazing has been the reluctance of the horticultural establishment to confront the issue and remedy it with appropriate revision of the offending nomenclature.

A prime example is the term ******head--painfully offensive, yet in use throughout the world as a common plant name. In Australia, Edward Rotherham informs us in his book Flowers and Plants of New South Wales and Southern Queensland (Wellington, A.H. and A.W. Reed, 1982), ******head is the common name for Enneapogon nigricans, a stiff, black-green grass of the shrublands of New South Wales. According to John Salmon, the author of New Zealand Flowers and Plants (Wellington, A.H. and A.W. Reed, 1963), ******head reportedly is used as the common name for Carex secta, a swamp grass that rises out of the water to form a mound. And Nicholas Polunim writes in Arctic to Eastern Siberia: Circumpolar Arctic Flora (London, Oxford University Press, 1959) that ******head is used in the Arctic to refer to Eriophorum vaginatur.

The names ******'s-hand cactus and ******finger cactus have been given by Margaret Martin and her coauthors in the popular Cacti and Their Cultivation (New York, Charles Scribner's Sons, 1971) for Opuntia clavarioides, a small cactus with bizarre, slender, cylindrical branches. Alfred Graf, author of the widely used botanical guidebook Exotica (East Rutherford, N.J., Roehrs Co. Inc., 1980), gives ******-wool as a common name for the New Zealand Wire Vine (Muehlenbeckia complexa), apparently in reference to the basket plant's twining, wire-like purplish brown stems.

Occasionally one can still hear Brazil nuts (Bertholletia excelsa) referred to as ******-toes. Meanwhile, horticulturist P.A. Munz's California Flora and California Desert Wildflowers (University of California Press, Berkeley, 1970) lists ******head cactus as the accepted common name for Echinocactus polycephalus, a small barrel cactus native to California's southern deserts.

Zambia floridana, a beautiful dwarf native American cycad, has been called a Coontie, a reference to the tree's long, slender, green leaves. And in Australia, grass trees (Xanthorrhoe minor) are sometimes referred to as Blackboys, apparently because their palm-like trunks, often burned black by grass fires, remind some of Australian aborigines.

A religious or an ethnic reference in a compound vernacular name is bound to connote or imply the existence of an inferior or socially unusual quality. Thus, common names such as Pope's Nose (Proboscides jussieui), Jew Bush (Pedilanthus tithymaloides), and Jew's Mallow (Kerria japonic) have derogatory religious and ethnic origins. Jew's Beard (Tacca chantrieri) is a reference to the tropical plant's whisker-like inflorescence, which to some botanists seems to bear a resemblance to the beards of Orthodox Jews. Other, more appropriate common names for this plant include the Bat-flower and Cat's whiskers (with all due respect, of course, to bats and cats).

The name Coolie's Cap, which makes reference to the pill box-like hats worn by 19th-century Chinese immigrants, is still sometimes used as the common name for Holmskioldia sanguina.

In his book Common Names of South African Plants (Pretoria, Department of Agriculture Technical Services, 1966), Christo Smith points out the unfortunate frequency of use in compound vernacular names of the term Hottentot (as in Hottentot's Head for Strangeria eriopus). Smith writes: "Kaffir is not infrequently used in a derogatory sense to indicate some alleged inferiority..." He then goes on to list 75 common South African plant names that use the term.

In an article in the Cactus and Succulent Journal (51[5]:238-41, 1979), author Bruce Hargreaves wrote about Talinum caffrum, a succulent from Africa's Kalahari Desert, noting, "I apologize for using a racist term;~ `caffer,' or `kaffir,' a term derived from the Arabic for unbeliever, is the South African equivalent of `******'--but I didn't name this plant."

Hargreaves's dilemma stemmed from caffrum's being the scientific rather than popular botanical name; that is, in his scientific writings he had no choice other than to use it. However, we certainly do have a choice in our use of plant names.

How many subtropical gardeners in the United States realize the racially derogatory implications of referring to Kaffir-lilies (Clivia minata or Schizostylis coccinea), Kaffirboom Coral Trees (Erythina caffra), or Kaffir plums (Harpephyllum caffra)?

The origin of some derogatory or racist names that remain in the common botanical vernacular without malicious intent--or so one prefers to think--are so obscure that they are used by people who would never dream of using such obviously offensive common names like ******finger cactus or Coolie's Cap.

The widespread use of Digger pine for Pinus sabiniana is a good example. The tree grows on dry, rocky slopes, below 4,500 feet, on hills bordering California's Central Valley and interior coastal ranges. Sunset Books' widely used New Western Garden Book (Menlo Park, Calif., 1980) designates this tree as a "marker plant"--a plant delineating an important Western climatic gardening zone. (Sunset's Zone 7, "California's Digger Pine Belt," is a several-thousand-square-mile area with hot summers and mild, but pronounced winters.)

When the gold-seeking Forty-Niners poured into California during the last century, they had little respect for the native people they encountered. Secure in their belief of racial and religious superiority, they mockingly called the Native Americans of the area "diggers" when they saw them foraging for roots and bulbs. Pinus sabiniana's common name originated when the prospectors noted the tree's value to California Indians.

Understandably, many Native Americans find the term digger offensive. A spokesman, who requests anonymity, for the California State Native American Heritage Commission says, "The word `digger' is very derogatory and insulting to California Indian people." A historical interpreter, who also requests anonymity, for the California State Indian Museum in Sacramento agrees: "To call a California Indian a `digger' means you are either ignorant or you are purposely trying to insult him. It is a very derisive word." These observers concur in the opinion that the term digger is as offensive to California's Native Americans as the term ****** is to African Americans.

Of course, terms like ******head and Digger pine should have been purged from botanical literature long ago. However, botanical books and magazines containing these offensive common plant names are currently widely available.

Surprisingly, there is a great reticence among botanical scientists to challenge the existence of these racist relics in the garden. Before The Scientist agreed to publish this article, the idea had been rejected by a half-dozen regional and national horticultural and garden magazines. The editor of one scholarly West Coast journal, which represents a number of influential horticulture societies, rejected the idea by responding, "I feel it would stress the sociological implications at the expense of the botanical. Into an article [on plants] the origin and implication of the vernacular name might fit with a sentence or two." A prominent California horticultural society also shied away from a discussion of racially derogatory common plant names. The editor of the society's journal commented: "The subject is inappropriate and appears to create a quarrel where there isn't one at present . . . your charge of racism is a little dramatic, I feel."

On the bright side, some editors have taken an active role in eliminating racially offensive cololoquial names for plants. James C. Hickman, editor of The Jepson Manual--a botanical reference work soon to be published by the University of California Press--reports that, in the manual, "Echinocactus will be called `clustered barrel cactus,' a simply descriptive name. Pinus sabiniana will be called `gray pine' or `foothill pine.' " However, Hickman notes, "Because it is so widely and innocently known as `digger pine,' we included a note asking people not to use that name because of its pejorative origin. I think this is better than not mentioning the issue at all." Hickman adds, "The other name I know of that will not be used is `wandering Jew,' for Tradescantia fluminensis; it will be called spiderwort--which is possibly derogatory toward arachnids."

Additionally, Hickman notes, "The dilemma, of course, is that truly colloquial or truly common names cannot be controlled, but are a matter of usage. I believe our challenge as authors and editors is a long-term one of swaying usage toward less offense without leaving innocents high and dry."

Those who continue to use racially offensive plant names should be challenged. Elizabeth Knoll, sponsoring editor for science and the history of science at the University of California Press, says, "I will make it a point of telling the authors and the advisory board members--if they don't have the sense to realize it already--that racist and derogatory terms are unacceptable." However, she expresses her concern that "the very nomenclature of some sciences carry racial prejudices. My guess is that other scholars could point out more examples--a depressing and important undertaking."

The problem of purging racist common names from gardening's vernacular is relatively simple compared to the much more complex problem of expunging racially based scientific names, such as Erythina caffra, Harpephyllum caffra, and Talinum caffrum.

The issue of derogatory proper botanical names is more troublesome. If scientists persist in using them, and insist on their being published verbatim, writers and editors of botanical journals should, at a minimum, footnote their own objections when clarity or expedience dictates the use of a proper plant name that has been derived from a racially offensive term.

The use of a racial epithet as an accepted, published botanical common name perpetuates and legitimizes bigotry, even if it does so unintentionally. Botanical editors, botanists, and gardeners should know common names such as Kaffir-lily, Digger pine, and ******head cactus are racial slurs, and they must play a forceful role in eliminating their use. To do less would leave the appearance of condoning bigotry in botany.

The enlightened efforts of Knoll, Hickman, and others like them are laudable. Without their efforts, young African American or Native American scholars, perhaps just developing an interest in botany, will understandably be discouraged and disillusioned to find racist terms in botanical literature.

One can only imagine the damage that already has been done in this regard.

Melvin Hunter is an Atascadero, Calif.-based science writer specializing in botanical subjects.



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Scientist 5[23]:0, Nov. 25, 1991


© Copyright 1991, The Scientist, Inc. All rights reserved.
We welcome your opinion. If you would like to comment on this article, please write us at editorial@the-scientist.com
News | Opinions & Letters | Research | Hot Papers | LabConsumer | Profession
About The Scientist | Jobs | Classified | Web Registration | Print Subscriptions | Advertiser Information
 

Dan

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Planderella said:
Sad to say, a number of racially offensive common plant names long ago slipped into the vernacular of gardening, and some have found their way into horticulture's most important reference books. Sadder still is the fact that several of these offensive names are still in common use. And most amazing has been the reluctance of the horticultural establishment to confront the issue and remedy it with appropriate revision of the offending nomenclature.
One plant hanging from the ceiling of my Florida room, purchased at Lowe's, is a Wandering Jew. Yup ... that's what the professionally made label said. Not Spiderwort, but "Wandering Jew." It's a pretty, hardy plant, but I was shocked when I first saw the name.

The name does hanve a certain ring to it, you have to admit.

Surveyor with a dirty mind.

They finally named someplace after me.

Yup ... Betcha' didn't know my middle name was "Packtrail," did ya'?

Yeah, yeah ... "without a paddle." Yup, you're clever ...

Gotta' love drunk surveyors.

Named by a four year old Hawai'ian.

Planderella ... here's one in Louisiana.

Redundant.

(Gawd ... these are starting to soun like Maxim taglines.)

And now, a sermon by Reverend PlannerGirl ...

Finger digging good.

The small town where I want to retire.
 
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SouthSideSlayer

Cyburbian
Messages
86
Points
4
Condemnation of the word "squ*w"
The American Indian Movement Support Group of Ohio and Northern Kentucky






squaw (skwô)
n.

Offensive. A Native American woman, especially a wife.
Offensive Slang. A woman or wife.



[Massachusett squa, younger woman.]







Source: The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition
Copyright © 2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.






Condemnation of the S-word

The American Indian Movement Support Group of Ohio and Northern Kentucky condemns the use of the word "squaw" to refer to Native women outside of its proper tribal language contexts. As the American Indian Movement chapters of Arizona and Southern California have stated:

American Indian women and men all around the United States and Canada reject the use of the word squaw in reference to American Indian women. The word has been imposed on our culture by European Americans and appears on hundreds of geographic place names. Suzan Shown Harjo brought the issue to national attention on the Oparh Winfrey Show back in 1992. Since that time projects to eliminate the use of the word on geographic sites have formed in Minnesota (Dawn Litzau and Angelene Losh), in Arizona (Delena Waddle and Seipe Flood), in California (Stormy Ogden), and in Iowa (Fawn Stubben). Many other states are forming groups to eradicate the use of the word from geographic place names and women's sports teams.

When people argue that the word squaw appears in the dictionary, remind them that the word is also identified as derogatory. The Thesaurus of Slang lists the term squaw as a synonym for prostitute, harlot, hussy, and floozy.

When people argue that the word originates in American Indian language point out that:

In the Algonquin languages the word squaw means vagina.

In the Mohawk language the word otsikwaw means female genitalia. Mohawk women and men found that early European fur traders shortened the word to squaw because that represented what they wanted from Mohawk women.

Although scholarship traces the word to the Massachusset Indians back in the 1650s, the word has different meanings (or may not exist at all) in hundreds of other American Indian languages. This claim also assumes that a European correctly translated the Massachusset language to English--that he understood the nuances of Indian speech.

Attitudes of white supremacy account for the need of separate identifying terms such as squaw and buck. In order to justify the taking of the land, American Indian women and men had to be labeled with dehumanizing terms. Europeans and European Americans spread the use of the word as they moved westward across the continent.


When people say "it never used to bother Indian women to be called squaw, respond with the following questions and statement.

Were American Indian women or people ever asked? Have you ever asked an American Indian woman, man, or child how they feel about the word? (Do not say the word yourself, simply call it the "s" word) then state that it has always been used to insult American Indian women.


When people ask "why now?" explain that:

Through communication and education American Indian people have come to understand the derogatory meaning of the word. American Indian women claim the right to define ourselves as women and we reject the offensive term squaw.
Please see "SQUAW -Facts on the Eradication of the "S" Word" at http://home.earthlink.net/~rosebud9/#squaw or http://www.geocities.com/aim_arizona_chapter/S-Peak.html

As Tina Talkington of the Arizona chapter of the American Indian Movement has pointed out, Native women have always been offended by the word and known that the term was not used to flatter or honor Native women; it has never been meant as anything but a put-down, a way to keep Native women "in our place." Native women have always complained about it; only in recent years have people actually begun to listen to what Native people say instead of simply ignoring them or dismiss them as radicals trying to cause a problem or as victims of political correctness.

Geographic place names that use the offensive term "squaw" have been renamed in Oregon, Montana, Nebraska, Wisconsin, and Maine. Similar movements to replace the offensive term are underway in South Dakota, Idaho, Oklahoma, and others.

The American Indian Movement Support Group of Ohio and Northern Kentucky also strongly agrees with Vickie Whitewolf Marsh, Instructor of Native American Studies at the University of Cincinnati regarding the use of this word:

"The word Sq**w is not only politically incorrect it is down right offensive to all of us that share the biology and spirituality of being an American Indian. The word sq**w is just as offensive to American Indians as the "n" word is to African Americans. I do not appreciate a word which refers to my female anatomy in an offensive way. I am not black or white, I am red, and I am human. I and the culture I represent have the right to be referred to with dignity."

The American Indian Movement Support Group of Ohio and Northern Kentucky therefore requires that the S-word be understood to be offensive and an inappropriate way to refer to Native women. Use of the word is not politically incorrect; it is just incorrect. It is not only racist and derogatory; it is profanity in that it reduces Native women to genitalia, similar to another common profane word. Use of the word in any aspect of any institution—educational, corporate, or otherwise—allows for the normalization of institutionalized discrimination. The word is known to be racist and use of it in a federally-funded institution can lead to forfeiture of that funding. Use of the word in any aspect of non-institutional and institutional interactions indicates a serious lack of cultural sensitivity and respect for Native American cultures, peoples, and women.

http://aim_support.tripod.com/TheSword.htm
 

Tranplanner

maudit anglais
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7,903
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Boogertown?

Who the hell would name their town Boogertown?

Wonder if the local high school football team is called the "Nuggets"?
 

Journeymouse

Cyburbian
Messages
443
Points
13
My personal favourite is Wetwang - a place in the East Yorkshire Wolds. In fact, the 'Yorkshire' area is quite good for funny sounding names and names that are funny in translation due to the mix of briton/welsh, saxon and norse names...
 

PlannerGirl

Cyburbian Plus
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6,377
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28
ROTFL

thanks Dan I need a laugh to start my day in hell (read office)

now they need to name a town after my nick name "head bitch barbie" :) HBH for short

there is a Climax NC its near Apex
i live in Ballston a part of Arlington
There is Falls Church Va-wonder if they were Catholic?
 

Dan

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Planderella said:
Dan....you're sure you haven't doctored up those maps????? ;););)
No Photoshop whatsoever. Otherwise, there would be even more imaginative names.

BTW, I didn't bother posting maps of "Dead [animal] [feature]". There's literally hundreds of 'em in some Western states.
 

adaptor

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6
I have regretted not stopping in Monkey's Eyebrow, KY on my drive across the state a few years ago ...
 

Jeff

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When I was driving through Delaware last night I thought of this thread immediately when I saw the sign for Coochie ..... 5 miles. I can't remember the rest of the name though. Anyone else familiar with this little tucked away oasis in the great state of Delaware?
 

El Feo

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674
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19
rustbelt said:
I have regretted not stopping in Monkey's Eyebrow, KY on my drive across the state a few years ago ...
Ah, Monkey's Eyebrow - home of my sister-in-law's family! That's on the way to Maggie's Bottom...
 

el Guapo

Capitalist
Messages
5,985
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I went to EOD school in Indian Head, MD. Don't get going SSS! I didn't name the place.

Let's not forget Peculiar, Missouri. Got me a hunting dog there once.

And last but not least: Conception Junction, Missouri
 

BKM

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6,464
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29
Not a place name, but

A minor street in my hometown is named Harry Balls Drive
 

Tom R

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24
Coochie

Mike DeVuono said:
When I was driving through Delaware last night I thought of this thread immediately when I saw the sign for Coochie ..... 5 miles. I can't remember the rest of the name though. Anyone else familiar with this little tucked away oasis in the great state of Delaware?
There is a Cooch's Bridge near Newark, Dealware. The Cooches (the family is still there) are a very historic clan. General Cornwallis commandeered their house during the Revolutionary War sometime around the battle of Brandywine.
 

Jeff

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That could've been it then. It probably was in the area of Newark since I was coming from Dover.
 

Dan

Dear Leader
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In the "What in God's name were they thinking?" category, we have ... drumroll please ...

Ang again, in the "did we really win the war?" category ...
 
Last edited by a moderator:

pandersen

Cyburbian
Messages
243
Points
9
Place Names

Kanahar, Saskatchewan
Cow's Lick, Newfoundland
Carrot River, Saskatchewan
Puslinch Township, Ontario
Rockwood, Ontario
Mono Mills, Ontario
Bastard Township, Ontario
Sisterville, West Virgina (nuff said)
 

nerudite

Cyburbian
Messages
6,544
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29
Re: Place Names

pandersen said:

Bastard Township, Ontario
Sometimes I feel like I work for this jurisdiction. ;) But really... It would be more like "Municipality of Cranks". But close enough.
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
Messages
10,078
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33
Some Wisconsin places

Gays Mills, Embarass, Hustler, Bloomer, Blue Mounds, Brodhead, Dickeyville, Pigeon Falls, Pound, Woodman Woodboro, and Woodville, Beaver Dam, Prairie du Sac, Red Mound, Sugar Bush, Grand Chute (near Little Chute, not far from Butte des Morts), Pittsville, Wanderoos, Big Flats, and Winter.

There is also Colby, New Munster, New Holstien, or if you prefer, Brussells, Belgium, Luxemburg, Alaska, Rome, Athens, Troy, Hollandale, Germantown, Genoa, The Village of Genoa City, Ontario, Poland, Berlin, Montreal, New Amsterdam, and Scandanavia

Then there is the Bong Recreation Area, or maybe you prefer Pardeeville. There is Spread Eagle Lake, Bastard Lake, Coffee and Tea Lakes, and No Man's Lake. Two Creeks is a small hamlet outside of Two Rivers.

My first Wisconsin job was in Mazomanie (May-zoh-may-nee). It is a native American name that translates roughly to "Iron that Walks. The village was founded by the Milwaukee and Mississippi Railroad (i.e. "iron horse") in 1854. Mazomanie was a member of the Sac tribe whose only mention in history is that a Frenchman dared Mazomanie to shoot him, so he did. If only it was still so easy....
 

Tom R

Cyburbian
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2,274
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24
NAMES

I'd like to say one thing to all the "Homers" out there - "DOH."
 

dbpubs

Member
Messages
1
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0
a late addition...

Tom R, Ky has a Nonesuch.

The state is full of what would in other areas be mis-pronunciations:

Athens "A-thens"
Yosemite "Yo-sa-mite"
Versailles "Ver-Sales"
And then there is the largest city, Louisville: named after that great King of France, King "Loo-a" XIV
Having just adopted this site, I wanted to add to Kentucky place names my grandmother grew up around, such as Skullbuster, Clabber Bottom, Turkeyfoot, and Stamping Ground. And, it's LOO-vul. Get it right. :)
 

DecaturHawk

Cyburbian
Messages
880
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21
Here in Michigan, we have Hell (a hamlet south of Pinckney in Livingston County); in fact, they are my client!:-@ [here come the "sold your soul to the devil" jokes]

Last year on June 6, 2006 they had a big celebration. The owner of the Hell Country Store told the township that they expected 200 folks, but got over 5,000. The township gave him a ticket for holding a gathering of over 200 persons without a permit.
 

mgk920

Cyburbian
Messages
4,202
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26
Mourningwood?
About 10-15 years ago a subdivision plat with a street named 'MORNINGWOOD CT' was approved here in Appleton. A couple of years after it was built, the city council approved an ordinance changing its name to 'MORNINGVIEW CT'.

(City crews had grown tired of constantly replacing the sign)

:p

Mike
 

Bear Up North

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
9,329
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30
Here in Michigan, we have Hell (a hamlet south of Pinckney in Livingston County); in fact, they are my client!:-@ [here come the "sold your soul to the devil" jokes]
Katie and this Bear will be camped just a few miles from Hell, starting Wednesday, 7-25-07. We will be at the Bruin Lake Campground, although some of our precious vacation time will be at the bar in Hell, The Dam Site Inn. :)

If all goes well, we will dance naked around the campfire, chanting the anthems of devil worship.

;-);-);-);-)
_____

Michigan also has a Climax and a Paradise. Great area around Paradise.....waterfalls, Lake Superior, north woods, bear, moose, beautiful deserted-for-miles beaches. :)

Gay, MI, has a great bar, with locals speaking with such a Scandanavian accent that they are hard to understand. The bar is a favorite with travelers.....The Gay Bar. (Neat old building!)

This Bear lived in Liberty Center, OH. Not explicit but an appropriate place for a Libertarianish gent to dwell.

Northwest Ohio has Oregon (Toledo suburb), Kansas, Texas, and Florida. Other parts of Ohio include Idaho (scenic!) and Ontario.

Bear
 

ICT/316

Cyburbian
Messages
488
Points
14
I’ll have to say that Arkansas has some of the most unique and interesting names. They may not be as “risqué “ has the above list, but they are colorful! Just open up the old Rand McNally (yes, the paper version!) and start scanning. Here is a big list and surely not all:

Gassville, Green For, Three Brothers ( I swear there is a something “Sister“ to go along with this one), Pencil Bluff, Board Camp, Natural Dam, Witcherville, Pennys, Cash, Rich, Banks, Stamps, Welcome, Packers, Old Milo, Bigelow, Jerusalem, Palestine, Bee Branch, Cornerstone, Lodge Corner, Star City, Indian, Overcup, Marked Tree, Fifty-Six (that’s right, like 56 the number!), Birdeye, Birdsong, Strawberry, Smackover, Magazine, Big Fork, Y City, Umpire, King, DeQueen, Social Hill, Joy, Romance, Delight, Possum, Evening Shade, Twist, Back Gate, Ink, Floral, Rosie (Next to each other of course), Rose Bud, Blue Ball, Nail, Hunt, Lone, Deer, Old Jenny, Story, Wing, Snowball, Ben Hur, Light, Driver, Ratio, Pansy, Weiner, and Success.

I’m sure all of you from Arkansas are great, but man they had to have been drinking:b: some of the time to name those towns.;)

“Hey, Franks writing on a chalk board! Lets name the camp “Chalk Board”.:s::b::b:

Bill
 

illinoisplanner

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5,336
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While not necessary sexual or anything, I always found it interesting that they created "Romeo"ville as a counterpart to "Joliet" here in Illinois. I think they did it on purpose too, strangely enough (Romeo & Juliet).
 
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357
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12
not all rude, some just plain odd:

Cockermouth, Cumbria
Knock, Cumbria
Shelf, West Yorkshire
Nempnett Thrubwell, Somerset (could be a Dickens character)
Temple Cloud, Somerset
Chew Magna, Somerset
Looe, Cornwall
Bessy Beneath, Cornwall
Threemilestone, Cornwall
Sevenmilestone, Cornwall
Goonbell, Cornwall
Old Leake, Lincolnshire
 

Journeymouse

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443
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13
Speaking of Cumbria - how about Torpenhow? Sometimes called Torpenhow Hill, which makes it "Hill" four times over in four different languages. And it's actually pronounced Truh-pen-uh by the locals and us offcomers who fancy being able to get proper directions ;)
 

jmello

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2,583
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21
Some standouts in NC:

Valle Crucis
Cerro Gordo
Duck
Monkey Junction
Calypso
Chocowinity
Chiquapin
 
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